Physical Manifestations of Overtraining

We know about how training too much can leave us feeling tired/drained/de-motivated, and even affect our strength and CNS adversely, but I wondered if it can actually cause more physical changes? For example, can overdoing it actually cause you to gain bodyfat and lose (brace yourself) definition/tone?

[quote]ShutUpAndSquat wrote:
We all know about how training too much can leave us feeling tired/drained/de-motivated, and even affect our strength and CNS adversely, but I wondered if it can actually cause more physical changes? For example, can overdoing it actually cause you to gain bodyfat and lose (brace yourself) definition/tone?[/quote]

I’d say definitely.

You’d have to not listen to your body (i.e - have no common sense) and keep on training to that extent for a while before you saw a noticable negative impact on your body though.

Not idea about bodyfat, but I wouldn’t see why.

More like lose muscle, getting easily irritated/emotive, having trouble to eat/sleep.

[quote]AlexD wrote:
Not idea about bodyfat, but I wouldn’t see why.[/quote] Cortisol

[quote]More like lose muscle, getting easily irritated/emotive, having trouble to eat/sleep.
[/quote]

I think chronic overuse injuries are probably about the worst part of over training. Tendinitis, sprains, chronic knee or back pain, est. My joints start to let me know if Iâ??m pushing to hard.

[quote]BONEZ217 wrote:
AlexD wrote:
Not idea about bodyfat, but I wouldn’t see why. Cortisol

More like lose muscle, getting easily irritated/emotive, having trouble to eat/sleep.

[/quote]

Cortisol stores fat does it? The cortisol i produce actually does the opposite. Unlucky you…

[quote]BONEZ217 wrote:
AlexD wrote:
Not idea about bodyfat, but I wouldn’t see why. Cortisol

More like lose muscle, getting easily irritated/emotive, having trouble to eat/sleep.

[/quote]

Thanks for the heads up, I would have thought of cortisol as well in a stressful (not only training wise) context but not here when losing weight is likely.

But it actually increases lipolysis… it wont make you fat.

However inactivity with high cortisol levels leads to fat gain as you burn muscle (and some fat too) so have a massively high blood sugar level which will eventually be stored as we dont get stressed in the same way we were designed.

(well most of us dont…)

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I’ve been training as much as 6 days on / 1 day off, using the SealFit weekly protocol. The workouts can be pretty intense, but I try to limit them to 1 hour. There’s at least one ‘active recovery’ day each week though, which helps a lot.

For reference, www.sealfit.com. The workouts form a mixture of strength, endurance, work capacity training through bodyweight stuff, weights, cardio and oly lifts.

[quote]J-J wrote:
But it actually increases lipolysis… it wont make you fat.

However inactivity with high cortisol levels leads to fat gain as you burn muscle (and some fat too) so have a massively high blood sugar level which will eventually be stored as we dont get stressed in the same way we were designed.

(well most of us dont…)[/quote]

Fine

But as a person who stays at a fairly low level of bodyfat year round and when I’m under stress, for days upon days, I seen an impact on my body composition. Maybe I’ve confused the muscle catabolism for fat gain.

Well, losing muscle would increase your BF% of course.

The slightest variance in composition becomes very noticeable after a while don’t you think?

i notice 1-2lb fluctuations in composition - whether fat (or sc water) or more muscular (or IM water)

[quote]ShutUpAndSquat wrote:
I’ve been training as much as 6 days on / 1 day off, using the SealFit weekly protocol. The workouts can be pretty intense, but I try to limit them to 1 hour. There’s at least one ‘active recovery’ day each week though, which helps a lot.

For reference, www.sealfit.com. The workouts form a mixture of strength, endurance, work capacity training through bodyweight stuff, weights, cardio and oly lifts.[/quote]

Sounds like a plug to me.

FWIW i am training 6 days a week too… about 1.5 - 2 hours.

Unassisted too (for the critics).

But i have the recovery and built upto that of course.

Some buddies and I have been doing sealfit/military athlete for about 8 months solid now. I would say that with all the work we do sometimes we’ve built in a recovery week. But we’ve only had to do that a few times. We’ve also (which you’re allowed to do according to sealfit) is break the workout up, so we might do the warmup/work capacity in the morning and the strength/durability in the evening.

Try working out with a buddy for motivation - even when the body is dragging.