T Nation

Pharmaceutical-Grade...

is a word I hear so often when it comes to supplements. It’s used everywhere, like a marketing ploy to make something sound better. I mean, is there really a difference between pharmaceutical-grade eurycoma and just eurycoma? or Tribulus Terrestris? It’s even being used for fish oil!

Pharmaceutical grade items have been tested against stringent specifications and are free from impurities.

Is that a real term/standard, though? Who determines whether or not it gets the official “pharmaceutical grade” stamp? Is there a governing body of some sort? I know that that’s what they’re trying to get you to think, but is it just pure BS, or is there some level of purity (X percent, or something), that defines when something is pharmaceutical grade?

[quote]BIGRAGOO wrote:
Pharmaceutical grade items have been tested against stringent specifications and are free from impurities.[/quote]

I know pharmaceutical grade refers to high quality, but I just feel that a lot of supplement companies(not Biotest) take advantage of the wording and use it for everything.

Well, companies that put that on the label, should be able to give an assay of their product that lists the level in ppm or ppb of impurities. I know that many Creapure sellers send a certificate of analysis on the batch.

Pharmaceutical-Grade also means that the compund is listed for consumption. Non pharmaceutical grade items will be labled for lab/industrial use only. Pharm grade must pass tests for consumption

It defines a level of purity. It may also define maximal levels for certain types of impurities, such as heavy metals.

Basically, it means it is safe for human consumption, without risk of incorrect dosing due to impurities or risk of illness due to certain types of unhealthy impurities.

Other types of grades, perhaps for use within industrial processes, have differing levels of less stringent purity rules.

[I was Googling for some exact definition, but wasn’t able to come up with anything definitive]

[quote]vroom wrote:
It defines a level of purity. It may also define maximal levels for certain types of impurities, such as heavy metals.

Basically, it means it is safe for human consumption, without risk of incorrect dosing due to impurities or risk of illness due to certain types of unhealthy impurities.

Other types of grades, perhaps for use within industrial processes, have differing levels of less stringent purity rules.

[I was Googling for some exact definition, but wasn’t able to come up with anything definitive][/quote]

But you’re pretty sure that it’s a real thing that can actually be defined? It actually does mean something when it’s on a label?

[quote]Damici wrote:
But you’re pretty sure that it’s a real thing that can actually be defined? It actually does mean something when it’s on a label?[/quote]

At the least it means that the ingredients meet the minimum requirements for human comsuption.