T Nation

Permanent Benefits of Steroids

Stumbled upon this study describing possible permanent benefits from steroid use (in terms of muscle growth/performance). The study is quite old as well (2008 I think). Did a search on here but didn’t find anything on it.

Donâ??t know much about juice and wondered what some of you more knowledgeable folk have to say on the matter. Personal experience is also welcome of course. If there is substance behind this I can’t help but feel like it’s just another reason to do a cycle, even if it’s only once.

PS Not interested in a debate concerning banning steroids in sports or the morality of steroid use.

Thanks guys

Interesting. I like the idea that AAS can alter your musculature in a such a way that future training might benefit. It suggests that it might be worthwhile to cycle well before you hit your “genetic limit” if you’re willing to accept the consequences.

I wonder if the new muscle cells ever die back off? If not, that’s an advantage I’ll always have over people who have never used, and I’ll never feel right lifting in a tested federation…

[quote]hockeysledder wrote:
Interesting. I like the idea that AAS can alter your musculature in a such a way that future training might benefit. It suggests that it might be worthwhile to cycle well before you hit your “genetic limit” if you’re willing to accept the consequences.

I wonder if the new muscle cells ever die back off? If not, that’s an advantage I’ll always have over people who have never used, and I’ll never feel right lifting in a tested federation…[/quote]

I always thought it was GH/IGF-1 that had the ability to recruit myosatellite cells to differentiate to create new muscle fibres?
I thought AAS only increased the size of existing muscle fibres but didnt have the ability of satellite cell differentiation. I may have been wrong.

SB

Singhbuilder, Its difficult to make conclusions from the limited information given about the study. It doesnt specify what “anabolic steroids” were used so its possible GH/IGF-1 was included as well.

Also I thought it may just be that the differences in musculature were due to performing at a high level regardless of whether AAS was used to get there or not.

To quote the findings section of the article: ‘The researchers found that several years after anabolic steroid withdrawal, and with no or low current strength-training, the muscle fiber area intensity, the number of nuclei per fiber in the quadriceps was still comparable to that of athletes that were currently performing high intensity strength-training.’

Doesn’t this just mean that the old users were comparable to current tranees who don’t use? Its possible that the permanent changes are a result of the actual training and not the AAS.

Again: ‘They also discovered that the shoulder-neck fiber areas were comparable to high-intensity trained athletes and the number of nuclei per fiber was even higher than found in the current steroid-using group.’

The last part interests me because the old users had higher nuclei per fibre than current users. Possibly because the current users, while using AAS, have not yet reached a level equal to the old users in terms of performance/muscle maturity.

Just throwing ideas around.

Wow that was very a very interesting article, I would like to know even more about that study it is strange how as the article states ‘They also discovered that the shoulder-neck fiber areas were comparable to high-intensity trained athletes and the number of nuclei per fiber was even higher than found in the current steroid-using group.’ in my research I would have believed that the current steroid using group would be slightly higher if not on the same level.

I may remember this wrong or be mixing it with other studies but I have read that before but I thought it was just AAS used and always assumed they would know the difference between steroids (lipid soluble) and the peptides that are water soluble and not referred to as a steroid.

Also, I see nothing about cell differentiation. Muscle cells have multiple nuclei per cell (fiber) and an increase in the nuclei=increase in potential protein synthesis.