T Nation

Periodization/DUP

As far as I can tell, from what I have read, DUP is the best form of periodization for Strength Training.

As I think about periodizing my own training - I have to consider more than just strength training, I have to consider other aspects of my fitness, as I am a cyclist/runner/triathlete (undecided…)

Typical and popular knowledge tells me to build a base of mileage or volume and then to build onto that with increasing intensity and lowering the volume up until the peak race (Linear Periodization).

I do have a little bit of trouble with DUP though, as it really reminds me of the way Greg Lemond trained as outlined in his cycling book (can’t remember the title) which included every type of training every week.

This overall training in lifting very closely resembles the “Greg Lemond” type training. Where you train everything in a week.

But now how to apply this?

DUP and Overall training seem very similar in a lot of ways.

Maybe overall training is good for beginners and only once you have started to stagnate should you begin to periodize in a real sense?

Today things started to come together a little more for me, I read the Specialization article, it talked about keeping everything on maintence except for one muscle group once your overall training has slowed or stopped.

If I decide to look at the specialization method as my answer, what would i subsititue as “muscles” for focus if i was considering running or cycling seperately? (let’s not confuse things right now with the possibility of 3 different sports…)

It seems that after all this it brings me right back to where I started - the popular knowledge, that I should open up a period for working only one energy system at a time while maintaining the rest.

So this is what I have in conclusion so far, and am looking for others to chim in and help me put the puzzle together completely.

I as an athlete returning from injury, should do a sort of DUP/overall training plan until I reach that point where gains slow, after which I should switch to periodizing in the popular sense, where I build up to my goal races rather than just train everything a little bit.

I should obviously keep with me, even while i train everything a little, my goals.

My goals being to do cycling races of 50 miles competitively, and to run 5k-10k races competetively, and maybe do a triathlon or two just to see if i like it, means:

I should work on:

-Cycling Endurance up to 50-75 miles
-Running Endurance up to ~10 miles
-Running and cycling Threshold work
-Running and cycling anaerobic work (but very little)
-Running and cycling form work/speed work
-Swimming - enough to have decent form and be in ok shape for a triathlon.
-Strength through hills/high gears/fast and short work/and lifting weights.

And only until my newbie/getting back into it gains start slowing a lot should i begin to do something like Weekly focus training (similar to DUP) then maybe after a while go to monthly - and finally to Linear leading right up to a specific race.

In other words DUP works best for begginers? Weekly works best for intermediate people, monthly for advanced, and linear for Elites looking to win specific races.

Let me just put my questions in a seperate post - i need feedback so here it goes…

am I correct in assuming what I did in the last paragraph of the last post?

How would any of you guys apply what you know about strength training and Periodization - DUP, Linear, Specialization, to Running or Cycling?

Is it a bad idea to try to just train generally, rather than specifically as a beginner or as an athlete returning from injury. In other words rather than racking up the miles or lifting 3 times a week or doing speed sessions, do them all, 3 workouts a week with 4 easy days each week. Possibly brining the injured athlete back up to par quicker and the newbie to an intermediate level quicker than Linear or specialization training/periodization?

For those of you not familiar with Greg Lemonds training this is what a week might look like for Greg.

Monday - off

Tuesday - Short sprints

Wednesday - long tempo ride

Thursday - short easy ride

Friday - Short sprints or tempo ride

Saturday - Race or long

Sunday - Race or Race simulation

I might have it a little off - but that is basically what he did, or at least said he did in his book.

Hi,

You didn’t specify what type of injury you have so that might change a person’s training regimen. Also, why don’t you give let Eric Cressey take a look at this since he’s one of Tri’s (training for Ironman) strength and conditioning coach.

Do you own any endurance training books? Anyways, hope you find your answers.

[quote]gold’s wrote:
Hi,

You didn’t specify what type of injury you have so that might change a person’s training regimen. Also, why don’t you give let Eric Cressey take a look at this since he’s one of Tri’s (training for Ironman) strength and conditioning coach.

Do you own any endurance training books? Anyways, hope you find your answers.

[/quote]

I wasn’t looking for so much a personal answer as a general one.

I own:

The Complete book of Running
THe Naked Warrior
Bicycling Magazines "complete book of Raod Cycling skills
Lactate Threshold Training
Training tips for Cyclists and Tiralthlets
Lore of Running
The Lance Armstrong Performance Program
The Ultimate Ride
Core Performance

I have read about 20 more books - and I own more i just can’t think of them right off hand :confused:

None of these books really go into good detail - I would say I have learned more specifics from here and Owen Andersons stuff.

I also printed off the CTS training guide thing that is in the members section, when i used to be a member.

I have the knowledge - or at least a lot of it - i just want to put it together better.

Thanks for the reply - i was worried no one would reply to that mess :smiley: ( I will have to work on my Conciseness…)