T Nation

Pause vs No Pause: How Much Difference?


#21

how about box squating? i mean this seemed pretty obvious to me, let me know if im just talking crazy talk, but if your trying to emphasize a pause in the hole wouldnt you just set up a box at the depth your trying to reach and stay focused on staying tight and driving out of the hole?


#22

[quote]weightHERO wrote:
how about box squating? i mean this seemed pretty obvious to me, let me know if im just talking crazy talk, but if your trying to emphasize a pause in the hole wouldnt you just set up a box at the depth your trying to reach and stay focused on staying tight and driving out of the hole?[/quote]

“…or how about you box squat at your ‘hole’ height.” - forevernade 02/04/09 03:45 PM


#23

[quote]TYPE2B wrote:
Dave284 wrote:
I have no idea why you would ever pause anything other than a bench but the difference is pretty small for me. Maybe 0-5lbs.

It’s mainly for variation purposes.[/quote]

I wasnt asking, I was insinuating that it would pointless. Its like focusing on tempo during a squat, why not just man up and lift more weight rather than fagging about with pointless crap.


#24

[quote]Dave284 wrote:
TYPE2B wrote:
Dave284 wrote:
I have no idea why you would ever pause anything other than a bench but the difference is pretty small for me. Maybe 0-5lbs.

It’s mainly for variation purposes.

I wasnt asking, I was insinuating that it would pointless. Its like focusing on tempo during a squat, why not just man up and lift more weight rather than fagging about with pointless crap.[/quote]

I think that advice is good advice for you 2B. Take it or eat it, either way it will probably come out your rear end in another post a few months down the track.


#25

[quote]TYPE2B wrote:

271 divided by 300 = .903333

So if I base this approximation with your bench press, that means on average, a person’s paused bench press is 90% of what he can bench press touch and go.

Thanks alot! And you’re a very strong teen deadlifter! A football coach would be proud to have you.[/quote]

Its actually 92.75%.


#26

[quote]malonetd wrote:
TYPE2B wrote:
271 divided by 300 = .903333

So if I base this approximation with your bench press, that means [u]on average[/u], a person’s paused bench press is 90% of what he can bench press touch and go.

How do calculate average with only one known value?[/quote]

.90333 + 0 = .90333

.90333 / 1 = .90333

That means the average of .90333 is equal to .90333


#27

[quote]Dave284 wrote:
TYPE2B wrote:
Dave284 wrote:
I have no idea why you would ever pause anything other than a bench but the difference is pretty small for me. Maybe 0-5lbs.

It’s mainly for variation purposes.

I wasnt asking, I was insinuating that it would pointless. Its like focusing on tempo during a squat, why not just man up and lift more weight rather than fagging about with pointless crap.[/quote]

IT’S FOR VARIATION PURPOSES!!!


#28

The slightest change in an exercise can make huge differences. Charles Poliquin has once instructed one of his athletes to switch shoes every session. For him, that slight change in the elevation of the heels is enough to provide a different stimulus. Why do you think westsiders have TONS of good morning variations? The slightest inch-by-inch shifting of the range of motion can already change an exercise. Glute activation with an ATG squat is more compared to a parallel squat, which makes them “different” from each other even though they are both “squats”.


#29

[quote]TYPE2B wrote:
malonetd wrote:
TYPE2B wrote:
271 divided by 300 = .903333

So if I base this approximation with your bench press, that means [u]on average[/u], a person’s paused bench press is 90% of what he can bench press touch and go.

How do calculate average with only one known value?

.90333 + 0 = .90333

.90333 / 1 = .90333

That means the average of .90333 is equal to .90333[/quote]

Yeah, I understand mathematically how to do it, but I don’t understand why you would even work with it.

You know what, I don’t care to even have this conversation. Go have fun over-analyzing the ridiculously minute things.


#30

[quote]TYPE2B wrote:
The slightest change in an exercise can make huge differences. Charles Poliquin has once instructed one of his athletes to switch shoes every session. For him, that slight change in the elevation of the heels is enough to provide a different stimulus. Why do you think westsiders have TONS of good morning variations? The slightest inch-by-inch shifting of the range of motion can already change an exercise. Glute activation with an ATG squat is more compared to a parallel squat, which makes them “different” from each other even though they are both “squats”.[/quote]

Serious question here: Do you lift weights?


#31

[quote]TYPE2B wrote:
The slightest change in an exercise can make huge differences. Charles Poliquin has once instructed one of his athletes to switch shoes every session. For him, that slight change in the elevation of the heels is enough to provide a different stimulus. Why do you think westsiders have TONS of good morning variations? The slightest inch-by-inch shifting of the range of motion can already change an exercise. Glute activation with an ATG squat is more compared to a parallel squat, which makes them “different” from each other even though they are both “squats”.[/quote]

You are honestly one of the most retarded people ive ever spoken too. All of what your talking about are tiny, minute issues that make virtually no difference in the grand scheme of things.


#32

[quote]Dave284 wrote:
TYPE2B wrote:
Dave284 wrote:
I have no idea why you would ever pause anything other than a bench but the difference is pretty small for me. Maybe 0-5lbs.

It’s mainly for variation purposes.

I wasnt asking, I was insinuating that it would pointless. Its like focusing on tempo during a squat, why not just man up and lift more weight rather than fagging about with pointless crap.[/quote]

I may be wrong, and believe me, I FREQUENTLY AM. And if I am wrong this time, please correct me…

It’s not pointless to pause at the bottom when doing an ATG squat. It minimizes (not necessarily eliminates) the stretch reflex, which can be good or bad DEPENDING ON YOUR PURPOSE.


#33

[quote]malonetd wrote:
TYPE2B wrote:
The slightest change in an exercise can make huge differences. Charles Poliquin has once instructed one of his athletes to switch shoes every session. For him, that slight change in the elevation of the heels is enough to provide a different stimulus. Why do you think westsiders have TONS of good morning variations? The slightest inch-by-inch shifting of the range of motion can already change an exercise. Glute activation with an ATG squat is more compared to a parallel squat, which makes them “different” from each other even though they are both “squats”.

Serious question here: Do you lift weights?[/quote]

Yeah.


#34

[quote]Dave284 wrote:
TYPE2B wrote:
The slightest change in an exercise can make huge differences. Charles Poliquin has once instructed one of his athletes to switch shoes every session. For him, that slight change in the elevation of the heels is enough to provide a different stimulus. Why do you think westsiders have TONS of good morning variations? The slightest inch-by-inch shifting of the range of motion can already change an exercise. Glute activation with an ATG squat is more compared to a parallel squat, which makes them “different” from each other even though they are both “squats”.

You are honestly one of the most retarded people ive ever spoken too. All of what your talking about are tiny, minute issues that make virtually no difference in the grand scheme of things.

[/quote]

I may be wrong, and believe me, I FREQUENTLY AM. And if I am wrong this time, please correct me…

PAUSING MAKES A HUGE DIFFERENCE!!!


#35

[quote]TYPE2B wrote:
malonetd wrote:
TYPE2B wrote:
The slightest change in an exercise can make huge differences. Charles Poliquin has once instructed one of his athletes to switch shoes every session. For him, that slight change in the elevation of the heels is enough to provide a different stimulus. Why do you think westsiders have TONS of good morning variations? The slightest inch-by-inch shifting of the range of motion can already change an exercise. Glute activation with an ATG squat is more compared to a parallel squat, which makes them “different” from each other even though they are both “squats”.

Serious question here: Do you lift weights?

Yeah.[/quote]

What is the purpose of your training? Do you train for a sport? For bodybuilding? To just get stronger?


#36

[quote]TYPE2B wrote:
Dave284 wrote:
TYPE2B wrote:
The slightest change in an exercise can make huge differences. Charles Poliquin has once instructed one of his athletes to switch shoes every session. For him, that slight change in the elevation of the heels is enough to provide a different stimulus. Why do you think westsiders have TONS of good morning variations? The slightest inch-by-inch shifting of the range of motion can already change an exercise. Glute activation with an ATG squat is more compared to a parallel squat, which makes them “different” from each other even though they are both “squats”.

You are honestly one of the most retarded people ive ever spoken too. All of what your talking about are tiny, minute issues that make virtually no difference in the grand scheme of things.

I may be wrong, and believe me, I FREQUENTLY AM. And if I am wrong this time, please correct me…

PAUSING MAKES A HUGE DIFFERENCE!!![/quote]

Im not going to explain why you look so stupid if you cant figure it out yourself.


#37

It’s a reasonable question - but it’s basically intellectual masterbation. In the general population these things do not matter and they make a difference for only a very small number of people - higher level athletes.

When you have worked with enough clients you will know the answer and hopefully write about it.


#38

[quote]malonetd wrote:
TYPE2B wrote:
malonetd wrote:
TYPE2B wrote:
The slightest change in an exercise can make huge differences. Charles Poliquin has once instructed one of his athletes to switch shoes every session. For him, that slight change in the elevation of the heels is enough to provide a different stimulus. Why do you think westsiders have TONS of good morning variations? The slightest inch-by-inch shifting of the range of motion can already change an exercise. Glute activation with an ATG squat is more compared to a parallel squat, which makes them “different” from each other even though they are both “squats”.

Serious question here: Do you lift weights?

Yeah.

What is the purpose of your training? Do you train for a sport? For bodybuilding? To just get stronger?[/quote]

Olympic lifting stuff. Having a big rock bottom squat, clean, etc. I have a journal in here, and if you look at it, please don’t mock me. I already know I’m weak.


#39

[quote]PatMac wrote:
It’s a reasonable question - but it’s basically intellectual masterbation. In the general population these things do not matter and they make a difference for only a very small number of people - higher level athletes.

When you have worked with enough clients you will know the answer and hopefully write about it.[/quote]

Intellectual masturbation, yeah, that’s what “Sensei” from wannabebigforums.com told me.


#40

[quote]TYPE2B wrote:
malonetd wrote:
TYPE2B wrote:
malonetd wrote:
TYPE2B wrote:
The slightest change in an exercise can make huge differences. Charles Poliquin has once instructed one of his athletes to switch shoes every session. For him, that slight change in the elevation of the heels is enough to provide a different stimulus. Why do you think westsiders have TONS of good morning variations? The slightest inch-by-inch shifting of the range of motion can already change an exercise. Glute activation with an ATG squat is more compared to a parallel squat, which makes them “different” from each other even though they are both “squats”.

Serious question here: Do you lift weights?

Yeah.

What is the purpose of your training? Do you train for a sport? For bodybuilding? To just get stronger?

Olympic lifting stuff. Having a big rock bottom squat, clean, etc. I have a journal in here, and if you look at it, please don’t mock me. I already know I’m weak.
[/quote]

I’m not going to mock anyone for their lifts. But I will mock someone for their endless and mindless questioning. And, without looking at your log, I will guess that you haven’t been lifting very long. That’s fine. We all start somewhere.

The thing is, you’re really getting wrapped up in things that make very little difference in the grand scheme of things. You can sit and worry about pauses and heel elevation and keep changing movements. Or you can keep doing the same rock-bottom squats that you want to be strong in and improve those. I mean, if your squat goes up significantly, chances are every movement related to it went up, too.

Once you’ve been lifting for many years – and I’m talking at least 5-6, but probably closer to 10 years – and one your lifts and progress start stalling, then you can start worrying about the more minute things. That’s when the smaller things matter more.