T Nation

Partial Deads

so the rack at my gym is designed so that id be able to slide a bar through the bottom, maybe be 5 inches higher than normal and it has a top which would prevent me from locking out all the way

im kind of thinking about using this to do something like reverse rackpulls where instead of focusing on the lock out id be focusing on the liftoff, kinda like a 2/3rds ROM

do you guys think this would help me out in the starting position or would the increased height make this ineffective? i suppose i could stand on something to balance it out if it were that big an issue

but i figured id check in with yall b4 i went and tried it out.

Some of the Sheiko programs call for Deadlifts done just to the knee. Those days always follow up with Deadlifts from below the knee to lockout. I think it’s just a way to increase volume without cooking your CNS.

You could try deads from a deficit if you’re looking to get stronger at the bottom of the lift. stand on a platform that’s 2" or so high

[quote]matsm21 wrote:
You could try deads from a deficit if you’re looking to get stronger at the bottom of the lift. stand on a platform that’s 2" or so high[/quote]

dont have a platform

might be able to find something to stand on though so i guess it’ll suffice

Stand on plates.

Thib discusses these in his books as part of functional isometrics- basically pull into the pins as hard as you can for several seconds.

No personal experience but it seems like it’s worth a shot.

The Oly program that I am on calls for liftoffs which are pulls to the knee. I can’t really say how much these will help you and in what areas and such, but since it is in this program provided to me by a former Olympian, I can say that they helped me out.
Just my 2 pennies.

[quote]OrangeBroccoli wrote:
The Oly program that I am on calls for liftoffs which are pulls to the knee. I can’t really say how much these will help you and in what areas and such, but since it is in this program provided to me by a former Olympian, I can say that they helped me out.
Just my 2 pennies.[/quote]

it helped you with your pull from the floor?

Read some of Thibodeaus programs and check out some of the static work. With that rack you could do something like load up 225 or so, pull it to the top bar and hold for 8-10 seconds like your trying to pull through the pins. Then superset that movement with an easy full range fast explosive movement like power cleans (from the floor).
just an idea

[quote]OrangeBroccoli wrote:
The Oly program that I am on calls for liftoffs which are pulls to the knee. I can’t really say how much these will help you and in what areas and such, but since it is in this program provided to me by a former Olympian, I can say that they helped me out.
Just my 2 pennies.[/quote]

…Everything will raise one’s deadlift as long as he doesn’t create any negative motor habits such as hitching, etc…

As long as your posterior chain, upper back, and grip are getting stronger, you can be rest assured that your DL will go up… assuming that you don’t develop any detrimental motor habits.

[quote]TYPE2B wrote:
…Everything will raise one’s deadlift as long as he doesn’t create any negative motor habits such as hitching, etc…

As long as your posterior chain, upper back, and grip are getting stronger, you can be rest assured that your DL will go up… assuming that you don’t develop any detrimental motor habits.[/quote]

Rubbish.

No, not everything will help out, though addressing weaknesses is a good place to start.

Why would hitching not help your deadlift? Obviously it wouldn’t pass for a competition, but why wouldn’t hitching in training be ok? Assuming the OP has no intention of ever competing, why wouldn’t hitching be ok all the time?

[quote]LiveFromThe781 wrote:
so the rack at my gym is designed so that id be able to slide a bar through the bottom, maybe be 5 inches higher than normal and it has a top which would prevent me from locking out all the way

im kind of thinking about using this to do something like reverse rackpulls where instead of focusing on the lock out id be focusing on the liftoff, kinda like a 2/3rds ROM

do you guys think this would help me out in the starting position or would the increased height make this ineffective? i suppose i could stand on something to balance it out if it were that big an issue

but i figured id check in with yall b4 i went and tried it out.[/quote]

I’m not sure pulling off the bottom of your rack will help your pull off the floor. Especailly since you would be starting 5 inches off the ground. But as IronAbrams mentioned utilizing functional isometrics(pulling bar off floor to pins) can help. I did those a while back, pulling about 70-80% of my 1RM only 3-4 inches off the ground into pins as hard as possible. That might work with your rack. Just be careful. After a couple weeks of these I was pulling the rack off the floor and the gym GM started getting on my case.

This wouldnt help your pull from the floor but if you loaded up the bar heavier than normal it would be like doing partials. Would definitely help your grip strength if nothing else.

i’ve never been fond of pulling in a rack. the bar slides around and it’s a very good way to bend a bar. i find that if you want to pull from an elevation, stack shit up under the plates. i’ve used aerobic steps, wooden blocks and rolled up aerobic mats.

in my experience, if you are looking to be able to crack the weight off the floor, deficit pulls are a great way to go. my personal favorite is to use 35lb plates and then also stand on 25lb plates. to really make it brutal i like to pull against minibands as well.

[quote]LiveFromThe781 wrote:
it helped you with your pull from the floor?[/quote]

Yes it did.

i dont get it, if youre putting the weights on top of a weight it makes the bar higher…which’d make it more like a rackpull

[quote]IronAbrams wrote:
Thib discusses these in his books as part of functional isometrics- basically pull into the pins as hard as you can for several seconds.

No personal experience but it seems like it’s worth a shot.[/quote]

Ive tried them, and liked them.
I basically did them for my oly lifts because I was having problems pulling from the floor, and to help my body get use to pulling heavier weights(which I belive is one of Thib’s main reasons for doing them)

[quote]LiveFromThe781 wrote:
i dont get it, if youre putting the weights on top of a weight it makes the bar higher…which’d make it more like a rackpull[/quote]

Meat is saying he doesn’t like to pull out of a rack,
the bar moves allot , which it does,
he is pulling allot more then you or me, so for him it 's better

I do what he does,cause most places I train dont have a rack

I build up aerobic platforms and put the weights on those.
or you can stack 45’s up and put the plates on those too.

do the reverse for deficits stand on a 100lb or a couple of 45’s.

kmc

[quote]LiveFromThe781 wrote:
i dont get it, if youre putting the weights on top of a weight it makes the bar higher…which’d make it more like a rackpull[/quote]

that was the point i was trying to make.

i don’t like rack pulls for the reasons mentioned before but i do like to pull from an elevation. therefore, stacking shit up under the bar is the way i go.

Yeah stack some plates underneath. Pulling from the pins is a pain in the ass.

Bar slides around to much, my feet would always get shifty, etc.

Plus, the clanking on the pins while doing reps got irritating to me.