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Parkour Anyone?

Anyone here do/like parkour? I started off maybe 6ish years ago, but took a break in college (my worst years for physical fitness).

Love it. Stopped practicing it regularly, but whenever my little brother comes to visit we still go and run the city every now and then.

I primarily do the climbing parts of it, that is what I like the best/the best at.

I like it. I do it when my work schedule permits, and have gone a few times a month for about 9 months.

I dont like it.

If you like your knees and ankles, then you should not like it either.

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It is awesome.

Id say definitely way more potential for injury than lifting weights. I stay in the padded, controlled environment of the parkour gym.

Then again, I am experienced with weights and suck at parkour, so maybe I am doing it wrong…

I did it for a few years, no significant injuries, I did most of my training outdoors, however I would say most people especially beginners should train in gyms most of the time and just do the outdoors stuff for fun, looking back I would say there was a lot of injury potential in outdoor training.

Back when I started there weren’t any parkour gyms, the only thing close would be open days at the gymnastics gyms but even then you were still pretty limited.

Spider-Man may be the greatest practitioner of this sport.

They don’t call him Peter Parkour for nothin’!

[quote]Nards wrote:
Spider-Man may be the greatest practitioner of this sport.

They don’t call him Peter Parkour for nothin’![/quote]

You hit the nail on the head there, MacGyver.
All this jumping and climbing around is all fictional.
The human body is not really made to handle the forces involved with jumping from building to building. Unless you get bitten by a radioactive spider.

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You obviously have a chip on your shoulder about it, bird, but it is a pretty big oversimplification to call pk “jumping from building to building.” The main thing I have been taught at pk is how to lessen the impact when landing on things. After that it became more plyometrics and ballistics.

I also dont think pk, which, to make another oversimplification, is basically gymnastics but with less spandex involved, is something people’s joints cannot handle, especially when scaling up dificulty as one progresses. Though its not a perfect argument, pk seems remarkably similar to the way other primates move through their environment.

But, if someone unskilled just starts jumping off buildings then yeah, its gonna hurt.

[quote]theBird wrote:

[quote]Nards wrote:
Spider-Man may be the greatest practitioner of this sport.

They don’t call him Peter Parkour for nothin’![/quote]

You hit the nail on the head there, MacGyver.
All this jumping and climbing around is all fictional.
The human body is not really made to handle the forces involved with jumping from building to building. Unless you get bitten by a radioactive spider.

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The human body is not made to bench and squat a 1000 lbs too. But there are people who do that. They are not born on Krypton, they just train to get to that level.

Parkour is no different.
I practiced it under a Traceur who had me do only drop jumps from a height of 2 feet. Only 2 feet- over and over again for 3 months or so. He wanted me to learn to absorb the force properly without stressing my knees. My training for 3 months consisted of only drop jumps, tuck jumps and rolls. Again in both the jumps the focus was on landing as silently as possible- not the height.

Body building plays a huge role in Parkour. They call it armour building- Muscles strong enough to absorb all the forces caused by jumping around. The community is heavily hooked on to Mark Rippetoes’s Starting Strength. A 2X bodyweight squat and deadlift were the standards to shoot for in the gym I trained.

Most of the injuries you see in Parkour are cause of people just watching a youtube video and being all ‘jackass’ about it. Practicing it properly takes time…which is why I quit :stuck_out_tongue: