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Parents! Protein Supplementation & Children

Does anybody have any opinions/advice on supplementing a childs diet with protein powder? Examples of choice would be whey, milk or hemp protein.

The reason I ask this is my 15 month old son has gone off his food (teething and/or just being fussy). He will just about eat breakfast, which usually consists of oats & fruit or quinoa and fruit. Other than that it’s a bloody nightmare getting anything else into him. He went from three big meals a day (all home cooked) plus 500-600mls of milk n nibbles down to just breakfast and some nibbles that I manage to get into him throughout the day. It’s wrecking my head! His mood is great and his energy levels are flying.

I am aware that kids go through these phases but I want to make sure he’s getting a good blast of aminos with his breaki in the morning to sustain him throughout the day.

Any opinions or advice much appreciated!

Not a parent, but I see no reason (apart from possibly digestion issues) for not giving a child some whey or casein. In your post you stated that your child had milk before, so I would hazard a guess that he could tolerate some protein (maybe a blend of different types?).

And even at 15 months, you can’t resist Metabolic Drive :slight_smile:

[quote]silverhydra wrote:
Not a parent, but I see no reason (apart from possibly digestion issues) for not giving a child some whey or casein. In your post you stated that your child had milk before, so I would hazard a guess that he could tolerate some protein (maybe a blend of different types?).

And even at 15 months, you can’t resist Metabolic Drive :slight_smile:
[/quote]

Personally I dont see a problem with it’ but as he is so young and of course ‘my child’ I am hyper sensitive to anything to do with his health. Actually he probably would tolerate milk based proteins better than anybody here I guess, being so young and all.

He used to devour veggies and beef but not anymore’ so there is currently a big hole in his diet. I am just concerned about the dosage of protein I suppose?

Would creatine help?

Only messin!

I think he would stop drinking the shakes when he has had enough, it’s not like he has a traditional bulking mentality of getting more calories :slight_smile:

[quote]silverhydra wrote:
I think he would stop drinking the shakes when he has had enough, it’s not like he has a traditional bulking mentality of getting more calories :)[/quote]

Progress pic’s…

Stop messin now…

Anymore experience/knowledge/opinions in regards to what I asked?

I suppose I’ll let this one brew for now becasue I got an early start tomorrow, trying to come up with way’s to make my little man eat his grub…

you are thinking about giving your 15 month old child supplements?

if he isn’t eating go to a doctor, they’ll know what to do

and maybe you should seek one too for even considering such a idiocy

[quote]Esum wrote:
you are thinking about giving your 15 month old child supplements?

if he isn’t eating go to a doctor, they’ll know what to do

and maybe you should seek one too for even considering such a idiocy[/quote]

Whey protein is food. So is creatine (even though he was kidding). Probably better for the kid than nasty baby formula.

If your kid is not eating solid food, I think you have a bigger problem than just deciding whether to feed him whey or not. I’d take him to a doctor.

If he’s teething, it’s just a matter of it being too painful to eat hard food(ie beef). Find something softer?

[quote]grettiron wrote:

[quote]Esum wrote:
you are thinking about giving your 15 month old child supplements?

if he isn’t eating go to a doctor, they’ll know what to do

and maybe you should seek one too for even considering such a idiocy[/quote]

Whey protein is food. So is creatine (even though he was kidding). Probably better for the kid than nasty baby formula.

[/quote]

well that baby formulas pretty much are designed for babies. Unless you aren’t talking about some cheap ass crap baby food I’m pretty sure those are better suited for a baby than a whey supplement

squats & milk

greek yogurt?

raw eggs

[quote]Esum wrote:

[quote]grettiron wrote:

[quote]Esum wrote:
you are thinking about giving your 15 month old child supplements?

if he isn’t eating go to a doctor, they’ll know what to do

and maybe you should seek one too for even considering such a idiocy[/quote]

Whey protein is food. So is creatine (even though he was kidding). Probably better for the kid than nasty baby formula.

[/quote]

well that baby formulas pretty much are designed for babies. Unless you aren’t talking about some cheap ass crap baby food I’m pretty sure those are better suited for a baby than a whey supplement[/quote]

Designed for babies? really? How bout designed to make money. Better go scope some ingredients in baby formula their champ. How bout a shit ton of soy protein, free-glutimates, and until very recently lots of sweet as trans fats. check out the health profiles of populations recently introduced to formula [ie. africa] before you spit that obvious science. High quality protein vs. consistently low-quality formula.

Please tell me how baby formula is any more a “food” and not a “supplement” than protein powder.

Also the kid is not a baby, dude is 15 MONTHS OLD.

I vote Metabolic Drive cookies will go down like a shot. Formula has done a great job of making a generation of label-believing soy boys, take a swing in the other direction.

-chris

[quote]Avocado wrote:

[quote]Esum wrote:

[quote]grettiron wrote:

[quote]Esum wrote:
you are thinking about giving your 15 month old child supplements?

if he isn’t eating go to a doctor, they’ll know what to do

and maybe you should seek one too for even considering such a idiocy[/quote]

Whey protein is food. So is creatine (even though he was kidding). Probably better for the kid than nasty baby formula.

[/quote]

well that baby formulas pretty much are designed for babies. Unless you aren’t talking about some cheap ass crap baby food I’m pretty sure those are better suited for a baby than a whey supplement[/quote]

Designed for babies? really? How bout designed to make money. Better go scope some ingredients in baby formula their champ. How bout a shit ton of soy protein, free-glutimates, and until very recently lots of sweet as trans fats. check out the health profiles of populations recently introduced to formula [ie. africa] before you spit that obvious science. High quality protein vs. consistently low-quality formula.

Please tell me how baby formula is any more a “food” and not a “supplement” than protein powder.

Also the kid is not a baby, dude is 15 MONTHS OLD.

I vote Metabolic Drive cookies will go down like a shot. Formula has done a great job of making a generation of label-believing soy boys, take a swing in the other direction.

-chris[/quote]

A-FUCKIN-MEN!!!

I couldn’t agree any more…kids are being fed total garbage these days, and I highly doubt many doctors out there have been, or care to, follow up on research in nutrition trends and their effects on kids, besides the obvious stuff of course. Yes, it could just be an issue of the kid having trouble because of the teething, but I don’t see how whey protein could be even imaginably bad for him.

I had a hard time watching my nephew, who’s about the same age, down bottle after bottle of that soy-loaded crap…but he is still a cool dude :slight_smile:

[quote]Esum wrote:
you are thinking about giving your 15 month old child supplements?

if he isn’t eating go to a doctor, they’ll know what to do

and maybe you should seek one too for even considering such a idiocy[/quote]

I think you totally missed my point. My son has gone off his food, but when he does want to eat, I want him to get the most out of his meal time.

I DO NOT INTEND ON GIVING HIM SUPPLEMENTS! Anyway’ you shouldn’t make blanket statements about supplementing a childs diet without first knowing whats actually in baby formula. You will be suprised to see the similarities they have with your own bodybuilding supplements.

My son was breast fed and predominantly eats organic veg, meat, yogurt, oats, fruit etc… so at the moment I am concerned about the sudden drop in calories’ especially protein needed for growth. So’ if adding a ‘small’ serving of whey to his oats, to bolster his protein consumption (until he gets back on track) isn’t going to harm him then I would like to know?

Doctors know f’all about nutrition and more than likely I’ll be met with “it’s just a phaes”.

[quote]tw0scoops2 wrote:
If your kid is not eating solid food, I think you have a bigger problem than just deciding whether to feed him whey or not. I’d take him to a doctor.

If he’s teething, it’s just a matter of it being too painful to eat hard food(ie beef). Find something softer?[/quote]

Thanks for the advice but it’s not as serious as it may seem to you. He does eat his breakfast but after that it impossible to get him to eat. He’ll maybe knock back a yogurt n some toast midday but he is missing his lunch n main meal. The beef is blended by the way!

I am just interested in bolstering his diet with protein until he gets back on track and whether this would be ok or not?

EXAMPLE OF GOOD FORMULA INGREDIENTS:

Partially skimmed milk, lactose, vegetable oil, demineralised whey powder, natural flavour, vitamin mix (vitamin C, vitamin A, vitamin D, vitamin E, thiamin (vitamin B1), riboflavin (vitamin B2), vitamin B6, vitamin B12, folic acid, pantothenic acid, vitamin K, biotin, niacin), mineral mix (potassium hydroxide, sodium citrate, iron sulphate, magnesium sulphate, zinc sulphate, potassium iodide, sodium selenite, copper sulphate, manganese sulphate), emulsifier (lecithin).

Protein supplement anyone?

I’m a dietitian and I’ve done some work with pediatrics and have a lot of experience with formulas considering that account executives are always dealing with us every month in clinical dietetics.

There’s nothing wrong with whey protein and I was about to point out that most enteral formulas for kids and tube feedings contain whey protein. After all, it’s the most easily digested and cheapest of proteins.

If you’re very concerned, you can just pick up a book on medical nutrition therapy or go to a pediatric RD.