T Nation

Palatinose and Fructose?

Hi Coach,
Found the following on Wikipedia under search ‘palatinose’:

**Isomaltulose (chemical name: 6-0-�?�±-D-glucopyranosyl-D-fructose), also known by the trade names Palatinose and NRGylose or Xtend Isomaltulose, is a disaccharide that is commercially manufactured enzymatically from sucrose via bacterial fermentation. It is a natural constituent of honey and sugar cane and has a very natural sweet taste. It has been used as a sugar substitute in Japan since 1985. It is particularly suitable as a non-cariogenic sucrose replacement. [1]

Isomaltulose is fully absorbed in the small intestine as glucose and fructose. Like sucrose, it is fully digested and provides the same caloric value of approximately 4 kcal/g.

Isomaltulose is not suitable for people with disorders in fructose metabolism, such as hereditary fructose intolerance. As isomaltulose is broken down into fructose and glucose in the digestive tract, people with this condition are likely to experience severe adverse effects if they consume isomaltulose. Consumers with fructose malabsorption may also be affected. In addition , people who lack, or are deficient in, the enzyme sucrase-isomaltase and cannot digest sucrose, are unable to digest isomaltulose.**

Is this for real Thibs? The bit where its absorbed as glucose and FRUCTOSE bothers me, as I am using lots of SWF and now Finibars as part of ‘The Protocol’. I was trying to exclude fructose intake peri workout, and only have it in the morning to replenish liver glycogen.
Maybe only a small percentage gets converted to fructose? I dunno…
If you could shed some light on this it would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks,
Pete

ref:[1] ^ Lina B, Jonker D, Kozianowski G (2002). “Isomaltulose (Palatinose): a review of biological and toxicological studies”. Food Chem. Toxicol. 40 (10): 1375â??81. doi:10.1016/S0278-6915(02)00105-9

[quote]PKS wrote:

Maybe only a small percentage gets converted to fructose?
[/quote]

This would be my guess, but I’d like to know for sure too.

Palanitose breaking down into glucose and fructose is expected in the same way that sucrose breaks down into fructose and glucose. They are both very similar molecules.

[quote]Josh Rider wrote:
Palanitose breaking down into glucose and fructose is expected in the same way that sucrose breaks down into fructose and glucose. They are both very similar molecules.[/quote]

What % of it is fructose approximately?

edit: just found it. 50% fructose according to one source.