T Nation

Oxygen Masks for Conditioning

Hi everyone, Here’s a wing-nut question. are there any gadgets out there that let you re-create the thin oxygen effect you get when training at high elevations. It seems like a respirator could be set up… any ideas?

THanks
Peter

http://www.go2altitude.com/

Looks fuckin unreal,cannot afford it though haha

Mate of mine trains in a gas mask to prepare for MMA - limited not quite the same as thin oxygen though, lol

There’s a video knocking around of Wanderlei Silva doing some conditioning with a mask and snorkel on. He looks like a bit of knob doing it but it must make your lungs work pretty hard.

To be fair, oxygen debt is oxygen debt, regardless of the partial pressure of oxygen in your environment. Hard conditioning at low altitude will carryover to high altitudes. You are depriving the muscles of oxygen regardless, so as long as you train hard, it doesn’t really matter.

I know some guy that got fucked over at the Tour De France made his own barometric chamber, and they fucked him over and said he cheated, but he slept in the thing.

[quote]Jamie_SL wrote:
There’s a video knocking around of Wanderlei Silva doing some conditioning with a mask and snorkel on. He looks like a bit of knob doing it but it must make your lungs work pretty hard.

To be fair, oxygen debt is oxygen debt, regardless of the partial pressure of oxygen in your environment. Hard conditioning at low altitude will carryover to high altitudes. You are depriving the muscles of oxygen regardless, so as long as you train hard, it doesn’t really matter.[/quote]

Ever since he’s been doing this shit his cardio has sucked balls. He’s training for a fight with his mouth open? I think the elevation thing is a myth it only works if your competition is at elevation.

[quote]drewh wrote:

[quote]Jamie_SL wrote:
There’s a video knocking around of Wanderlei Silva doing some conditioning with a mask and snorkel on. He looks like a bit of knob doing it but it must make your lungs work pretty hard.

To be fair, oxygen debt is oxygen debt, regardless of the partial pressure of oxygen in your environment. Hard conditioning at low altitude will carryover to high altitudes. You are depriving the muscles of oxygen regardless, so as long as you train hard, it doesn’t really matter.[/quote]
Ever since he’s been doing this shit his cardio has sucked balls. He’s training for a fight with his mouth open? I think the elevation thing is a myth it only works if your competition is at elevation.[/quote]

Yes, I believe most research has shown that to get benefit from high-altitude training, you have to be in a lower-oxygen environment from 8+ hours per day. Hence the “live high/train low” theory or why people sleep (not train) in barometric chambers.

Putting a snorkel in your mouth will just make it harder to breathe. I guess that could benefit in that it could get you mentally used to not being able to catch your breath and not freaking out. But it’s not similar to altitude training at all.

[quote]jtrinsey wrote:

Yes, I believe most research has shown that to get benefit from high-altitude training, you have to be in a lower-oxygen environment from 8+ hours per day. Hence the “live high/train low” theory or why people sleep (not train) in barometric chambers.

Putting a snorkel in your mouth will just make it harder to breathe. I guess that could benefit in that it could get you mentally used to not being able to catch your breath and not freaking out. But it’s not similar to altitude training at all.
[/quote]

Yeah, runners who live high-train high begin to get slower, as they can’t run as fast at altitude, and training under race pace for too long just sees them slow down even when they get lower again.
My old boss at one point worked for a company that did the whole simulated altitude training. Think you put on a mask and breathed a low oxygen mix for about half an hour per session for a few days in a row, then got a top up every few weeks. Think it increases your hematocrit (red blood cell count).

It’s also supposed to help speed up healing times for certain injuries.