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Overtraining: How Much is Too Much?

I’m still trying to figure out if the OP is serious

sadly…i think he is. I’ve met these kinda guys before who’ve asked me questions about lifting…you can go to war with words with them…but they always “win”.

fuck lifting weights, just post on the internet wooooooooo

regarding limits…it’s like walking through a room in the dark, eventually you’ll crack your face into a wall and go, damn it there is a wall there.

once you’ve found the wall you utilize all the tools you’ve acquired through reading and proper planning to bust through the fucking wall. The joy of this “experience” is busting your head against that mother fucker because you know what, once in a while you push back hard and the fucking wall moves for you!

Never mind, although based on your stats and lifts the “absolute limit” is 284lbs, you’ll marry, have two lovely children, and then after a moderately long life, you will die. Those are the variables so now that you know you will be better equipped to know about the knowing.

as others have mentioned one brick at a time, if I know my PR i’m not going to go way over it to fail or even worse risk injury, i’m going to keep adding little by little by correctly training in various manners to increase my strength if that’s my goal.

OP, just work hard and see where it gets you. When you start feeling like your bones are limiting the weight you can move instead of your muscles, you’ll have your answer. If you’re afraid you won’t know how much is too much before you get there - don’t be.

[quote]Alpo85 wrote:
Well, I do bust my ass in the gym every day, and my eating discipline is rock solid. I ask because my 1RM bench has skyrocketed up towards 275-285 and my deadlift is pushing 330. That’s about a gain of 50-60 pounds on the bench and 100 pounds on the deadlift in about 4 months. A dude that’s 5’11" and 183 has to have his limits.

Correct me if I’m wrong, but you don’t get that by being “just average” in the gym or in the kitchen.

As for my sources - I just got to thinking: there have to be limits the human body. After all, no one in this forum can squat 2,000 pounds - sorry meatheads. Where is the limit? Are there any rules that I can employ in my training routine (i.e. stick with 1.5xBW for bench, 2xBW for Deadlift and you’ll stay safe)?

The consensus in this message board seems to be if your body can do it…why not? I’m simply asking if there are repercussions - if so, how do I mitigate them?[/quote]

If your body can do it, then there’s not going to be any repercussions is there… BECAUSE IT CAN DO IT.

Moron.

Boy OP…I bet you had no idea it was going to turn out this way, huh?

I mean…I hear you…and I understand the question, but I honestly have no idea what the answer is or where to find it. And I’ve never even really thought about that before.

But I can tell you this, the BB forum on T-Nation is definitely not going to be the place to find the answer to your question.

Sorry I don’t have more to contribute…maybe WebMD…I have no idea.

Yeah, that’s the ticket… WebMD!

[quote]Professor X wrote:

Don’t worry, you are at ZERO risk of EVER being able to bench a bone breaking 400lbs. My ass literally fell off when I did it. It took 35 stitches to sew that son of a bitch back on so I’ve got dibs on the pink weights.[/quote]

I know you’re a doctor and everything, but come on. There is no way that isn’t bullshit.

35 stitches? It had to be more. Unless we’re talking about one cheek here.

[quote]countingbeans wrote:
Professor X wrote:

Don’t worry, you are at ZERO risk of EVER being able to bench a bone breaking 400lbs. My ass literally fell off when I did it. It took 35 stitches to sew that son of a bitch back on so I’ve got dibs on the pink weights.

I know you’re a doctor and everything, but come on. There is no way that isn’t bullshit.

35 stitches? It had to be more. Unless we’re talking about one cheek here. [/quote]

New technique. Twice the ass coverage with every thread. This apparently happens quite a bit…confirming that the OP should be very afraid of any weight higher than what he is lifting right now.

OP, If you are worried about injury, then you need to know that most injuries occur (my experience) during a submaximal lift. Pace yourself and use a BALANCED routine with a steady ( sometimes painfully slow) progression in your weight selection. You will be fine as long as you use proper body mechanics during your lifts.

[quote]Bill Roberts wrote:
For safety, stick to the pink dumbbells.[/quote]

QFT

Its all relative… 500lbs and you’d obviously hurt yourself, but a stronger guy might be using that as a warm-up… There was probably a time in which 135lbs would have been dangerous for you. So as far as safety goes, dont think in terms of absolutes, but what you are lifting relative to YOUR strength.

Im in the same boat as you sorta. Im still relatively young, but dont want to risk future problems where it isn’t necessary. You can still train very hard and progress though without unnecessary risks.

As for overtraining. Assuming you’ve learned the lifts correctly and pay attention to form, your biggest fear with overtraining with heavy weights will be CNS overtraining and losses in strength (Most people will agree that you cant train hard above 90% of 1rm for much longer than 3 weeks)

The other type of overtraining you’ll need to look out for is too much volume. This could be anything from performing too many sets to failure, too many forced reps, too many exercises, too much frequency or cardio. Cardio is the big one for me. If I try to do HIIT on a bike or elliptycal, I figure my volume is in the 500-1000+ range. If the intensity is somewhat high this causes way more microtrauma and fatigue for me.

So here is some random advice to help you out.

*Be realistic with how much you can lift (pay attention to form and control)
*Deload, and periodize your workouts to develop and recover different strength qualities
*Periodize your exercises (You dont have to give up BB benching or anything, but switch things up from time to time.
*Pay attention to the difference between accute stresses and chronic microtrauma and act accordingly (Changes in technique, exercise selection, foam rolling, stretching, icing, etc.)

Hope this helps.