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Overnight Weight Increase Prior to Increasing Mass

I’m not a bodybuilder, but I think bodybuilders are perhaps the best people to answer this.

Recently I’ve been doing a lot of very heavy (for me) whole body strength training - working towards some specific goals. I want relative strength so want to keep mass gains to a minimum. It’s not going to plan - fat is going down but weight is going up faster than I’d like! I’m at a stage in my training where I think this is going to start to escalate rather than slow down.

One thing that I’ve noticed is that prior to weight taking a little jump upwards (normally after a change in training approach) I put on about 2 - 3kg overnight. Fluid for repair I assume. That takes about 2 - 3 weeks to drop back down and it seems to settle at maybe half a kg above the old norm. I’m not 100% certain this pattern isn’t just cooincidence.

Has anyone else noticed this happen? I’m figuring if I can learn more about the immediate signs that something is making you build mass I might be able to better select training methods that’ll help me build strength whilst keeping mass to a minimum. At this point I’m not really sure what’s leading to the mass gains.

I’m not against the mass gain if relative strength keeps going up. But just want to better understand (and control) things.

A rise in interstitial fluid from damaged muscles should not be 2-3 kg for someone of your size, and should subside within 48 hours.

[quote]Ecchastang wrote:
A rise in interstitial fluid from damaged muscles should not be 2-3 kg for someone of your size, and should subside within 48 hours. [/quote]

care to elaborate? I don’t think I’m familiar with this phenomenon

You are becoming my favorite poster.

What is “relative” strength? Are there different kinds of strength out there? I have questions you have answers.

[quote]Yogi wrote:

[quote]Ecchastang wrote:
A rise in interstitial fluid from damaged muscles should not be 2-3 kg for someone of your size, and should subside within 48 hours. [/quote]

care to elaborate? I don’t think I’m familiar with this phenomenon[/quote]
Whenever you have muscle damage, especially DOMS, you have a small increase in fluid retention (swelling) of the muscle and interstitial fluids.

I’m confused regarding what your concern is:

The rapidity of the 2-3kg change, or
The magnitude of the change, or
The length of time it takes to lose the weight, or
The 1/2 kg that you’ve gained 3 weeks later?

I would guess it’s related to changes in appetite and hydration levels triggered by a new type of training.

[quote]Ecchastang wrote:
Whenever you have muscle damage, especially DOMS, you have a small increase in fluid retention (swelling) of the muscle and interstitial fluids.
[/quote]

True, but this is simply a movement of fluid from one part of the body to another. Barring a change in food/water intake, your weight would remain the same.

[quote]Ecchastang wrote:
A rise in interstitial fluid from damaged muscles should not be 2-3 kg for someone of your size, and should subside within 48 hours. [/quote]

That’s what I thought. Yet I’ve seen this pattern a few times now. 3kg is perhaps a bit of an exaggeration, but definitely 2kg.

I think it’s always after higher volume heavy strength training. And not just a one off - so reaching a new work capacity and sticking with it. Weight stays up until I get used to that level of training or else stop doing it.

Does that perhaps fit?

A few days ago I was a consistent 66kg. I changed my pullup training to something more intensive AND more volume (doing it every day too) and the past three days I’ve been 67.5kg. Today it’s jumped to 68kg. If past experiences are anything to go by it’ll drop back to 66.5kg in a couple of weeks.

[quote]Dr. Pangloss wrote:
True, but this is simply a movement of fluid from one part of the body to another. Barring a change in food/water intake, your weight would remain the same.
[/quote]
Generally it is still an increase in weight, due to increase thirst, and/or decrease of fluid excretion. But still, it is not a large amount of weight, maybe a pound for someone her size.

[quote]Ecchastang wrote:
Generally it is still an increase in weight, due to increase thirst, and/or decrease of fluid excretion. But still, it is not a large amount of weight, maybe a pound for someone her size. [/quote]

Agreed on all points.

[quote]Rockscar wrote:
What is “relative” strength? Are there different kinds of strength out there? I have questions you have answers. [/quote]

Relative strength is basically your ability to handle your own bodyweight.

Absolute strength is the maximum amount you can lift.

So for example,

Person A weighs 100kg and deadlifts 200kg.

Person B weights 60kg and deadlifts 140kg.

Person A has the greatest absolute strength; Person B has the greatest relative strength.

Relative strength is important for sports where you need to shift your body at speed. Very important for gymnastics, pullups etc. But also for running and so on.

[quote]Dr. Pangloss wrote:
I’m confused regarding what your concern is:

The rapidity of the 2-3kg change, or
The magnitude of the change, or
The length of time it takes to lose the weight, or
The 1/2 kg that you’ve gained 3 weeks later?

Whatever your concern, I would guess it’s related to changes in appetite and hydration levels triggered by a new type of training.[/quote]

It’s not down to eating more simply because it happens so quickly. I can come home from the gym 2kg heavier than when I arrived there! I don’t even drink more than normal - I guess I just hold onto the fluid.

Because it happens immediately after a workout and ultimately leads to a permanent increase in muscle mass I figured it might help me to pin down the workouts that cause me to put on mass…and avoid them!!! LOL Just not sure yet if I’m seeing the pattern I think I’m seeing. It could be increased glycogen stores I suppose? The permanent weight gain that occurs when the temporary increase goes away might just be coincidence.

You were at 63kg in March and 68kg now, but say you have lowered your fat percentage to 20%. How are you measuring that to know you are gaining LBM?

[quote]susani wrote:

[quote]Dr. Pangloss wrote:
I’m confused regarding what your concern is:

The rapidity of the 2-3kg change, or
The magnitude of the change, or
The length of time it takes to lose the weight, or
The 1/2 kg that you’ve gained 3 weeks later?

Whatever your concern, I would guess it’s related to changes in appetite and hydration levels triggered by a new type of training.[/quote]

It’s not down to eating more simply because it happens so quickly. I can come home from the gym 2kg heavier than when I arrived there! I don’t even drink more than normal - I guess I just hold onto the fluid.
[/quote]

Take your car keys out of your pocket the next time you weigh yourself.

Re-read what you’re saying: That you go to the gym, workout, and return home 2kg heavier than you left with no commensurate increase in food or water.

Where would the additional weight be coming from? What is the mechanism by which one can weigh 2kg more simply because they completed a workout?

This is silly.

Fluid retention. It has to be.

I can get big variations in weight just from normal hormonal fluctuations throughout the month. All down to fluid retention. But this is over and above that.

Something similar happens when I do an extra-ordinary amount of running. That’s down to increased glycogen stores though - and when it drops back to normal it really is back to normal - so not this permanent slight increase that I’m seeing.

Ecchestang - I’m judging fat levels by a combination of visual appearance and just monitoring levels with calipers. I have no idea how accurate my estimate of 20% is - that’s just a guess. But I am certain fat levels are reducing. Other people comment on it too.

I take it then that this isn’t something that bodybuilders are familiar with !

The more you post the more I think you are just fucking with everyone.

[quote]susani wrote:
Fluid retention. It has to be.

I can get big variations in weight just from normal hormonal fluctuations throughout the month. All down to fluid retention. But this is over and above that.

Something similar happens when I do an extra-ordinary amount of running. That’s down to increased glycogen stores though - and when it drops back to normal it really is back to normal - so not this permanent slight increase that I’m seeing.[/quote]

Where is the fluid coming from that your retaining? The air? Two kg is 2L of water.

[quote]I take it then that this isn’t something that bodybuilders are familiar with !
[/quote]

It’s true, we’re not. However, we are familiar with the principle of mass conservation.

:wink:

[quote]Dr. Pangloss wrote:

[quote]susani wrote:

[quote]Dr. Pangloss wrote:
I’m confused regarding what your concern is:

The rapidity of the 2-3kg change, or
The magnitude of the change, or
The length of time it takes to lose the weight, or
The 1/2 kg that you’ve gained 3 weeks later?

Whatever your concern, I would guess it’s related to changes in appetite and hydration levels triggered by a new type of training.[/quote]

It’s not down to eating more simply because it happens so quickly. I can come home from the gym 2kg heavier than when I arrived there! I don’t even drink more than normal - I guess I just hold onto the fluid.
[/quote]

Take your car keys out of your pocket the next time you weigh yourself.

Re-read what you’re saying: That you go to the gym, workout, and return home 2kg heavier than you left with no commensurate increase in food or water.

Where would the additional weight be coming from? What is the mechanism by which one can weigh 2kg more simply because they completed a workout?

This is silly.
[/quote]

lol… That or remove the sweat drenched clothing and let go of the water bottle.

According to this it’s a normal reaction to an increase in exercise that can be down to two things:

  • increased glycogen stores (3 grams of water for every gram of glycogen stored)
  • water retention due to muscle damage - DOMS (3-4lb weight gain)

And it subsides within 2 - 3 weeks.

I guess the type of training I do could result in a bit of both which is why I get such a dramatic increase.

That, and the fact that you guys haven’t experienced it suggests maybe it’s a red herring. That it doesn’t necessarily lead to a slight permanent increase in muscle mass. Back to the drawing board then! LOL