T Nation

Overconcerned About Overtraining?


#1

Watching the Olympics like many of you folks...make me think about this question, cause most of these fellows train 7 days a week for long periods (of course with proper sleep and nutrition), and some of them have impressive physiques...not just ripped but with good amount of muscle mass, specially rowers, gymnasts, sprinters....my question is, we have read, talked, learned lately that "less is more", we are concerned about overtraining, not getting enough recovery, etc. but how much of this is true?, in the past years i read about bodybuilders working out 7 days a week even 2 shifts, A.M and P.M, nowdays i read and talked with guys that some of them workout only 1 time or 2 times a week to avoid overtraining....so are we overconcerned about overtraining?


#2

I only fear under eating and under sleeping.... my .02


#3

I think a lot of it has to do with the intensity of the workouts. A lot of the olympic athletes, if not all, are following some sort of periodization program with scheduled workouts at scheduled intensities.


#4

I was beginning to think we were due for this week's forum about "overtraining."


#5

^ It's funny that you only expect 1 post about overtraing this week.
(LOL BEACH VOLLEYBALLERS DON'T TRAIN 5 DAYS PER WEEK??????!?!?!?!?)


#6

Don't forget that Olympic athletes have been training for years and have built up to training multiple times per day every day per week. They are also genetic anomalies and not everybody could train like they do.


#7

Who are these guys who work out 1 or 2 times a week?


#8

I was going to post a thread about overtraining, but I was afraid T-Nation had already hit enough threads about it, and if I went ahead and posted another, it might overtrain T-Nation, and the site would just shut down.


#9

LOL well played, ID.


#10

thankyou for being so thoughtful!


#11

If you trained like Arnold did in the 1960s (7-10x a week + 30 minutes of cardio 4-5x a week according to his own books), would you look like him? Probably not.

If you trained like Klokov (squat, bench, deadlift in the morning, oly lifts in the afternoon) would you be as strong as him? Probably not.

Genetics and drugs monitored by a doctor are two advtanges you probably don't have.

Stop worrying about overtraining and find YOUR limit. I personally think more 4x a week for the typical, average dude without drugs who has other responsibilities in life is plenty, but that's ME. Not YOU.

It's useless to worry what someone else's limit is, it has ZERO bearing on your own. It may be useful to know you can train more than 2x a week without dying, but now that you know that, stop worrying about it and lift. When your lifts regress or you feel burned out, back off. That's your limit. Now hit 90% of it for awhile and re-test in a few months/years.

Also, keep in mind that you can make gains while not training at full intensity or full frequency. So a 2/week program can work for you, as can a 4x/week program. Just saying.

Overthinking, stop it.


#12

I find that my best results come from a cycle, which as it pertains to training frequency, is as follows:

About 3-4 weeks going hard 6 days a week, 3 days of which are two-a-days
followed by about 2 weeks of going hard 3 days a week, one day of which is a two-a-day
All the while I keep a strict amount of MMA on my plate.
Again, this work fantastic for me, but everyone is so different, i recommend experimenting with my version and then tweaking it to suit yourself.


#13

[quote]big_guy wrote:
Watching the Olympics like many of you folks…make me think about this question, cause most of these fellows train 7 days a week for long periods (of course with proper sleep and nutrition), and some of them have impressive physiques…not just ripped but with good amount of muscle mass, specially rowers, gymnasts, sprinters…my question is, we have read, talked, learned lately that “less is more”, we are concerned about overtraining, not getting enough recovery, etc. but how much of this is true?, in the past years i read about bodybuilders working out 7 days a week even 2 shifts, A.M and P.M, nowdays i read and talked with guys that some of them workout only 1 time or 2 times a week to avoid overtraining…so are we overconcerned about overtraining?[/quote]

Who is only training 1 or 2 times a week and looks like a bodybuilder?


#14

[quote]big_guy wrote:
Watching the Olympics like many of you folks…make me think about this question, cause most of these fellows train 7 days a week for long periods (of course with proper sleep and nutrition), and some of them have impressive physiques…not just ripped but with good amount of muscle mass, specially rowers, gymnasts, sprinters…my question is, we have read, talked, learned lately that “less is more”, we are concerned about overtraining, not getting enough recovery, etc. but how much of this is true?, in the past years i read about bodybuilders working out 7 days a week even 2 shifts, A.M and P.M, nowdays i read and talked with guys that some of them workout only 1 time or 2 times a week to avoid overtraining…so are we overconcerned about overtraining?[/quote]

NO


#15

I train 6 days a week. COME AT ME OVERTRAINED BROS.


#16

[quote]DixiesFinest wrote:
I train 6 days a week. COME AT ME OVERTRAINED BROS.[/quote]

Oh you wait til this BCAA IV is done…

Just you wait right there

Imma gonna messa yous uppa


#17

I train seven days a week of some kind, (four days a week squatting and olympic lifting/ it’s variations and three days intense sprinting/endurance running) and I have no issue with over training. So unless I am a freak of nature the vast majority of people worried about over training are pussies.


#19

I’m surprised this hasn’t been mentioned.

Correct me if I’m wrong, but Olympic athletes don’t have typical jobs. They wake up, train. Eat. Train. Generally, their jobs seem to be flexible, not stressful, etc. from the (small amount of) research I have done. Bodybuilders, I would think more-so (because they are sponsored) are in the same boat.

I don’t say this to negate the work they do. Both Olympians and bodybuilders work extremely hard. But not having added life stressors helps out significantly.

I’m a college student and usually have no problem training 2 times a day 7 days a week during the school year. I work full time during the summer, and there isn’t a chance I could keep up that training schedule.

Not to mention most Olympians are cream of the crop genetics, but that has been mentioned before.