T Nation

Overcoming Asymmetry?

I’ve been lifting for about 8 months and started getting taped to record progress. I’m right handed, and I noted my right arm is consistently 1/2" bigger than my left, both at the peak of the bicep and at the “meaty” part of the forearm.

I’ve done quite a bit of one armed exercises and done equal reps with both sides trying to overcome this, but it seems to stay a pretty constant 1/2"

What’s the best way to work on getting more symetrical?

[quote]DocWagon wrote:
I’ve been lifting for about 8 months and started getting taped to record progress. I’m right handed, and I noted my right arm is consistently 1/2" bigger than my left, both at the peak of the bicep and at the “meaty” part of the forearm.

I’ve done quite a bit of one armed exercises and done equal reps with both sides trying to overcome this, but it seems to stay a pretty constant 1/2"

What’s the best way to work on getting more symetrical?[/quote]

The answer: Train more than 8 months

Seriously, that is largely a beginner issue because many aren’t used to using both sides of their body for larger tasks. One side always dominates. You overcome that by continuing to train, continuing to build size until there isn’t much of a discrepancy. In your everyday life, you stop carrying your book bag on only one arm, carrying all of the groceries with one hand or using the dominant to scratch your nuts.

My guess is, you need to work on size and realize that if your arms really haven’t grown much, how much change do you expect without any significant increase in muscle mass?

I agree with Prof X. Give it some more time. Probably 98% of people initially have one dominant side which is noticeably stronger, bigger, or both. Stay consistent with your training, be sure to include a fair amount of dumbbell work, and it’ll straighten itself out.

Well, that was a lot easier than I figured. Thanks for the advise.

[quote]Minotaur wrote:
Give it some more time. Probably 98% of people initially [/quote]

98? For some reason that struck me as funny (even though I agree with the point of the post).

Did you know that 64% of all statistics are just made up on the spot?

loading the plates may be a big part of it. I noticed a while back I always loaded the plates on with my right hand, and my right arm and anterior delt were bigger than the left. I made sure to use switch which hand I load plates with, and subbed in more db work, and things are balancing out. It’s not always obvious, but loading plates can be a very high volume of arm and shoulder work, with high training frequency.