T Nation

Over-Analysis of Form


#1

I wanted to get your guys' opinions on something...at what point do you accept that your form is solid enough to lift/have fun/keep pushing without continuing to over-analyze and fix things? I assume that there's ALWAYS something to be improved upon form-wise but does it get to the point where it's just not necessary for recreational/semi-competitive lifters?


#2

[quote]95whtgst wrote:
I wanted to get your guys’ opinions on something…at what point do you accept that your form is solid enough to lift/have fun/keep pushing without continuing to over-analyze and fix things? I assume that there’s ALWAYS something to be improved upon form-wise but does it get to the point where it’s just not necessary for recreational/semi-competitive lifters?

[/quote]

Always strive for the better. Always try to be better technically. But, technique is a pretty individual thing. If you feel comfortable, don’t have injuries, and you continue to improve, I would not change much.


#3

Appreciate the input man


#4

Agreed if it or you are not broken because of it don’t fix it.


#5

[quote]95whtgst wrote:
I wanted to get your guys’ opinions on something…at what point do you accept that your form is solid enough to lift/have fun/keep pushing without continuing to over-analyze and fix things? I assume that there’s ALWAYS something to be improved upon form-wise but does it get to the point where it’s just not necessary for recreational/semi-competitive lifters?

[/quote]

Just recently I saw a video of Brandon Lilly explaining the deadlift, where he mentioned that just now he discovered the stancewidth he feels most comfortable with.
The point is, that during the months/years of training you will vary on form. Furthermore, form is really up to the individual. As the other members said, as long as you feel comfortable and strongest without hurting yourself, that’s the way to go.


#6

You can definitely over analyze your technique. It’s good to post videos for reviews so people can point out large flaws, but it’s possibly not so good to critique every little thing about your own lifts. Next time you come to lift you’ll be thinking too much and probably mess up.

Once you’ve established decent technique and a strength base, just do it. Over time in training you’ll accidentally (or even on purpose) do things that feel different, better or worse, and you try them out for a while. Over the years your technique will evolve into what works best for you. As the poster above said, Brandon Lilly only just recently found the stance he prefers to deadlift with! (Source?)

Jim Wendler recently wrote a very good T-Nation article on it, which I recommend you read: http://www.T-Nation.com/readArticle.do?id=5683539


#7

If you’re just starting to lift I would look at the major mistakes many beginners make and make sure you are avoiding bad form. By bad form, I mean moving the weight in a way that could potentially injure you or just isn’t productive anymore (for example doing a good morning on the way up on your squat). Avoid the bad form and lift and get stronger.

Once you’re over that curve then it’s time to seriously start considering your form. For a semi-competitive guy? Why not?

However, don’t pull the “analysis to paralysis” bullshit.

Experiment for awhile, take into consideration your preferences and leverages, and develop an idea of the form you want to try. Make a plan to improve your game so that you can get strong in that form and do your training weight with the best form you can, but don’t just drop your programming or do a huge deload because you got some butt wink.


#8

[quote]Brandon Lilly only just recently found the stance he prefers to deadlift with! (Source?)
[/quote]

Here you go

I think it was in this video. Check it out, if not I have to find the source.