T Nation

Osgood Schlatter Disease

I’ve been diagnosed with it since the age of 14 however I’ve never actually combated it in anyway.

I’m 23 now and the condition is still there it a bump below the kneecap.

Just looking for some advice on what I can do?

I’ve started some mobility exercises and foam rolling.

Look forward to hearing your response.

does it still hurt? most people have the pain go away once they stop growing, but the bump will never go away without surgery.

and surgery is only done in extreme circumstances

Yup it still hurts at various times.

So the bump will never go? thats annoying. I just hate the look of it, so unnatural looking.

Have u experienced it?

[quote]OsgoodOuch wrote:
Yup it still hurts at various times.

So the bump will never go? thats annoying. I just hate the look of it, so unnatural looking.

Have u experienced it?

[/quote]

yes, i had it in my left knee. The bump is still there, solid as a rock (its really calcification which is basically bone). I know it looks kinda funny, but surgery can actually make it worse apparently.

im 22 now and mine stopped hurting at all once i stopped growing. although my left knee in general is not as solid as my right.

Do you do any specific work in order to combat it?

Are you limited in mobility? for exam sitting and bending for period of time?

I’m just curious as I’ve never paid any attention until now. I don’t want it to haunt me as I get older.

[quote]OsgoodOuch wrote:
Do you do any specific work in order to combat it?

Are you limited in mobility? for exam sitting and bending for period of time?

I’m just curious as I’ve never paid any attention until now. I don’t want it to haunt me as I get older.[/quote]

i have zero pain in the bump any more. at the time foam rolling helped i think, but ya sitting for a long time was painful (still is because of a partially torn patella tendon. My mobility and flexibility are actually excellent with out too much effort.

and i dont think my torn patella tendon is from the osgood-schlaters since my tendon near the tibia is fine, but the tears are right at the patella.

are u still growing?

I have the same symptoms as someone who has Osgood, without actually having the disease. What I have is basically Jumper’s knee but instead of my patellar tendon/knee hurting, it’s the tibial tuberosity (I do have a general ‘knee tendinitis’ though in my left knee but that doesn’t bother me much). I even got an MRI but it just showed inflammation on the patellar tendon/ligament and tib tuberosity. I’ve been dealing with this for over a year and it made me stop competing in Olympic weightlifting… and I’ve had only a handful of squat/deadlift workouts in the past year because of the pain.

Anyways, this is what a PT I saw told me:

  • Strengthen the pes anserine area as mine are weak (gracilis, sartorius, semitendinosus), strengthen the VMO as well. Strengthen the calves as well (single-leg standing calf raise)

  • Free up the lateral quad by lots of foam rolling, stuff like that. Stretch quad as well.

that’s basically it. Can’t say it’s been helping much. At this point I have a constant ‘tenderness’ on my bone, even when I’m at rest for weeks… and I know if I have that tenderness, I will have pain when I squat or deadlift, regardless of how much rehab I’m doing.

PB Andy,

the reason this was ineffective was because your PT has not provided you with one research based recommendation…

despite having a partially torn patella tendon in the same knee as i used to have osgood-schlatters in, i was able to do some nice looking pistol squats with both legs today for the first time.

although i must say the leg with the tear was a bit harder for sure.

[quote]olifter1 wrote:
PB Andy,

the reason this was ineffective was because your PT has not provided you with one research based recommendation…[/quote]
I’m all ears… lol.

I have stopped growing. I’ve just got to get use to the fact there will be a bump.

Im doing foam rolling exercises and trying to add exercises that will be good for my knee i.e. hip exercises, lower back and ankle.

I’m thinking of purchasing Mike Robertson bulletproof knee or eric cresseys functional movement?

you guys come across it?

I’ve also taking a rest for the next three weeks.

never bought any of those books. good luck keep us up-dated

and if anyone cares, here is the MRI I got on my knee earlier this year (the stuff that matters)

“There is grade 2 chondral thinning of the posterior lateral tibial
plateau with underlying T2 hyperintense bone marrow change. The
remaining articular cartilage in all three compartments is intact
without evidence of focal chondral defect. The patella is well seated
within the trochlea.”

so basically some cartilage thinning, which my ortho doc said is normal for a heavy weightlifter like myself (and the NFL football linemen he sees from the Chicago Bears) and nothing to be worried about. But there is bone swelling/edema on the tibial tuberosity itself, which makes sense since that is where my pain is at.

This website says it could take 8-12 weeks of full rest to get rid of the bone edema.

In my practice (foot and ankle care), I?ve tended to find that when we discover bone edema on an MRI, the injury may take as long if not longer than most fractures to heal. For instance, a common foot problem that we?ll see is a metatarsal stress fracture. If the stress fracture doesn?t show on plain x-ray, we?ll send our patient for an MRI. And if that MRI comes back with a diagnosis of bone edema within the metatarsal, we then have an idea about overall time that it?ll take for bone healing. What?s the typical duration of time for a metatarsal stress fracture? I?d tell most folks 8-12 weeks. But with bone edema in the metatarsal, it may take as long if not longer than a traditional fracture.

[quote]OsgoodOuch wrote:
I’m thinking of purchasing Mike Robertson bulletproof knee or eric cresseys functional movement?

you guys come across it?[/quote]

I bought Bulletproof Knees and wasn’t particularly impressed. A lot of it seems like compiled exerts of various physiology books, and can make difficult reading. It certainly didn’t give any insightful ideas into knee problems that I hadn’t already gleaned from the internet for free.

either way I scheduled another appt with my ortho doc Dr. Bennett before I email this prolotherapy doc (Dr. Hauser).

I’ve also been diagnosed with Osgood when I was 14.
I never had trouble with it until I started getting heavier since focusing on weight lifting and then only during ballistic stuff and only when I’m somewhat over 242 lbs.

What helps me is getting my hammies stronger.

Check out if anyone in your area performs the Graston Technique (http://www.grastontechnique.com/)

It breaks down the calcium that builds up.

My chiropractor performed it for a few months and it mad a world of difference with both training and sports while in season.

Also I have found that when I switched to training in Vibram Five Fingers, my patellar tendonitis improved significantly and is almost completely pain free

[quote]ChristianC wrote:
Check out if anyone in your area performs the Graston Technique (http://www.grastontechnique.com/)

It breaks down the calcium that builds up.

My chiropractor performed it for a few months and it mad a world of difference with both training and sports while in season.

Also I have found that when I switched to training in Vibram Five Fingers, my patellar tendonitis improved significantly and is almost completely pain free[/quote]

hmm interesting… there is definite calcification as my left tibial tuberosity is much larger than my right (which is pain-free). I thought they’d do Graston on a muscle like the quads, not an area like the tibial tuberosity?

I was diagnosed with Osgood-Schollter’s when I was 18 and in the military. Other than the bump sticking out somewhat, its never limited my ROM or any type of exercise. Have never had any pain, either. I’m 65 now and no change. Maybe I’m lucky?

Cheers!
Bob