T Nation

Organic Peanut Butter?

I thought I remembered reading something in a recent Poliquin article about organic peanut butter actually being really bad for you - something to do with fungus I think??? I can’t remember the specifics and couldn’t find anything when I searched.

I might be totally wrong, I don’t know. Can anyone help? Thanks in advance!

A fungus among us in our peanut butter??? Say it aint so! Eck

He may be referring to aflatoxin. That’s why I get organic valencia peanut butter as the valencia peanuts are less likely to have as much aflatoxin, or so I’ve heard.

I’ve heard that a few times - peanuts tend to harbor mold/fungi more than other nuts. That and peanut allergies and hypersensitivities are pretty common.

Sad but true.

The worst was when I bit into a Detour bar about 2 years ago and the whole inside around the peanut layer was filled with fungus!!! They apparently recalled a bunch of boxes and sent me a new box. To this day I’m still hesitant to eat their bars.

I thought it said that organic peanut butter was actually worse for you than non-organic. But like I said, I can’t remember for sure and I can’t find it in a search.

I might just be totally wrong, though! Does anyone know for sure?

[quote]Derock wrote:
He may be referring to aflatoxin. That’s why I get organic valencia peanut butter as the valencia peanuts are less likely to have as much aflatoxin, or so I’ve heard. [/quote]

Exactly right!

http://www.deanesmay.com/archives/007598.html

I usually eat a lot of natural or organic peanut butter. I am not going to change.

I buy the Smart Balance Omega peanut butter - doesn’t have the hydrogenated fats or sugars of the brand names, plus has added omega 3 fats from flax seeds. I buy it at the local Kroger grocery store, often with a coupon.

It also says it doesn’t need refrigeration, but based on the link that icecold posted above, I just put it in the frig.

I added fungus to my salad all the time, its great.

It was my understanding that the natural oil in peanuts will change to trans fat under the catalyst of heat. It will also go rancid, just like butter left out during the summer time.

As for “organic,” please note that the term organic implies strict hydrogen-carbon bonds, commonly described for petroleum based products. In foods, please refer to them as “natural” or “grown without chemicals” such as pesticides, herbicides or fertilizers. Organic chemistry is a discipline, having nothing to do with the way hippies grow stuff in their back yards.

[quote]kroby wrote:
In foods, please refer to them as “natural” or “grown without chemicals” such as pesticides, herbicides or fertilizers. [/quote]

No. “Organic” means the same damn thing. Learn to accept it!

[quote]boonville410 wrote:
kroby wrote:
In foods, please refer to them as “natural” or “grown without chemicals” such as pesticides, herbicides or fertilizers.

No. “Organic” means the same damn thing. Learn to accept it![/quote]

Hippie

[quote]kroby wrote:
It was my understanding that the natural oil in peanuts will change to trans fat under the catalyst of heat. It will also go rancid, just like butter left out during the summer time.

As for “organic,” please note that the term organic implies strict hydrogen-carbon bonds, commonly described for petroleum based products. In foods, please refer to them as “natural” or “grown without chemicals” such as pesticides, herbicides or fertilizers. Organic chemistry is a discipline, having nothing to do with the way hippies grow stuff in their back yards.[/quote]

The government has defined organic, so guess what, its one of those words that has 2 meanings-pseudonyms or something.

Actually, organic is defined differently by chemists. Some require only that C and H be present (methane) others require a carbon carbon bond Ethene, and others require 2 SP3 hybridized carbons bonded together.

And for what it’s worth, “organic” fertilizers are actually organic compounds as opposed to non-organic fertilizers which are not, so the name was actually applied for the right reasons-but overgeneralized.

[quote]Derock wrote:
He may be referring to aflatoxin. That’s why I get organic valencia peanut butter as the valencia peanuts are less likely to have as much aflatoxin, or so I’ve heard. [/quote]

Is this possibly present in Coffee mold as well?

Sometimes you just have to stop worrying.

http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/pr/2001/010612.htm

[quote]SeanT wrote:
I added fungus to my salad all the time, its great.[/quote]

We’re not talking blue cheese or mushrooms here.

Here this is what he said:

Do not eat Peanut Butter, even the natural kind; it contains a mould that has phyto-estrogens in it.

[quote]YoungGunner wrote:
Here this is what he said:

Do not eat Peanut Butter, even the natural kind; it contains a mould that has phyto-estrogens in it. [/quote]

Whatever, some is going to be fine. Don’t go nuts (or beans - as in Soybeans)…

Nobody around here is GORGING phyto-estrogens anyway. And if you are, you probably have bitch tits. That’s one way to know.

[quote]YoungGunner wrote:
Here this is what he said:

Do not eat Peanut Butter, even the natural kind; it contains a mould that has phyto-estrogens in it. [/quote]

It contains phyto-estrogens? And where is the research being done on this? I eat tons of organic peanut butter mixed with sea salt and I’ve never had this problem. Especially if the peanuts are dry roasted or soaked over night.

I really don’t think peanuts contain that much phyto-estrogens, if any. I think there is an old saying that “nuts are good for you nuts”.