T Nation

Opposite Stance Stuff Boxing

Hello this is my first post on this forum,I was with another website fight a while on the forums but felt like I needed a change so I came here.

A little on me I’m a ammy boxer southpaw with a good height/reach for my class.

I’m looking for more advanced or overlooked advice for a southpaw vs orthodox matchup.
(Been working outside foot position for a while,looking for other stuff)
Whatever it may be can help, positioning,concepts,feints,footwork,general tips,etc etc
Tips for landing more jabs? Tips for monitoring opponents rear hand? Tips for positioning upper and lower body? Your favorite thing to do against opposite stance fighter? Or anything yous think will up and I’m sure this could help a lot of people and not just myself

Thanks in advance!

Welcome to the forum. There are many knowledgeable boxers on this forum such as : Londerboxer, Irish, Ausso, Humble, Jim, etc…I am sure they will provide you with what you need. Again, Welcome.

Welcome to the forum. Unfortunately, general advanced tips that apply to all boxers are thin on the ground. The only real way to give constructive advice is to see footage of sparring, fights etc, or if you can describe a specific situation where you think you could have done better. The trouble with general tips like ‘how to land more jabs’ is that it varies from fighter to fighter, and advice might be as basic as ‘throw more jabs’, or more complicated, like adjusting your feet, correcting minor telegraphs you may be giving to your opponent, or the such like. It may also be that you are actually landing enough jabs, and it’s what you do afterwards that needs improvement.

If you have got the southpaw lead foot right, then you are probably getting to a decent level of experience. Something I found when I boxed southpaws is that refs can be more lenient or not notice minor infringements with footwork. I found that I could usually get away quite a few times with stepping on a southpaw’s lead foot as he was trying to step outside me and jab, and coming in with a shovel hook.

If you want to put some imaginary, detailed scenarios down that you might find yourself in, I’m sure we could all learn a lot by putting ideas out there for what we would do.

How about doubling up on the cross? I know pacquiao does it a lot but what is some advice to land this and any cons to doing this?

Also kind of on the same topic of the cross I have trouble landing mine in generally. I cant figure out why me and my coach have been working some stuff but I came here for any extra help on simply landing the 2 as a southpaw as its suppose to be the easiest punch. Funny because I land my jab and lead hook a lot.
Any advice on positioning or concept to land the cross more? Thanks in advance

Also I heard a trainer once say as a southpaw to jab to your opponents rear hand glove to cross him up then throw my 2…anyone hear of anything like this or what do you think of it?

[quote]shs101 wrote:
How about doubling up on the cross? I know pacquiao does it a lot but what is some advice to land this and any cons to doing this?

Also kind of on the same topic of the cross I have trouble landing mine in generally. I cant figure out why me and my coach have been working some stuff but I came here for any extra help on simply landing the 2 as a southpaw as its suppose to be the easiest punch. Funny because I land my jab and lead hook a lot.
Any advice on positioning or concept to land the cross more? Thanks in advance[/quote]

  1. I think in order to double up on the straight left hand at least one attack would be a ballistic punch (force generated from the arm) unless you could very quickly rotate and retract the “shooting” hip.

For me a straight lead involves a little preparation.

I would put a little additional weight onto your rear foot. I generally place my weight 60% on the rear foot, 40% to the fore; in preparation for a rear lead I would shift 70% to the rear.

Pivot the rear foot quickly and allow the rotation of the hip/shoulder to be the momentum driving the punch.
Weight will obviously be traveling forward with the punch, so at full extension the front foot’s heel should strike the floor and become flat; preventing your body from overextending and compromising your balance.

Obviously the generic rules apply; rotate the shoulder, elbow and fist as always…

Regarding foot position; I think in the chess match between a Southpaw and orthodox boxer the boxer taking the initiative to secure his lead foot outside that of his opponent’s has a 100% greater chance of landing a straight lead.

[quote]donnydarkoirl wrote:

Regarding foot position; I think in the chess match between a Southpaw and orthodox boxer the boxer taking the initiative to secure his lead foot outside that of his opponent’s has a 100% greater chance of landing a straight lead.

[/quote]

Golden advice. This is really all it comes down to. I really don’t think there are special rules for Southpaws. Control the fight with superior foot work/placement, and the rest will take care of itself.

Doubling up on the cross always seemed unimaginative and inefficient to me. When you throw the rear hand cross, your whole body is primed to hook, or use your lead hand as a cross, with much greater potential for power and surprise. I honestly don’t think I’ve ever been hit with a double cross, just because it is so inefficient that I’ve always seen the second of the two coming.

+1 to what london said, other than the sometimes awkward angles they come in at, southpaws aren’t naturally possessing of an advantage, its just the paradox is most orthodox fighters dont have a lot of experience against southpaws, while most southpaw fighters have almost exclusively experience against orthodox fighters.

To be fair, there are tactical considerations for which I feel a southpaw stance is superior, but being able to switch hit/fight efficiently out of both stances is something probably best left for when you’ve got a lot of experience.

Also on the pacquiao double cross, pacman whiffs the second punch. Keeping in mind, pacquiao is not a brilliant technician, even roach says this, it took roach a lot of work to be able to get pacman be more than just a brawler with fast hands, and he still does some things that are just out of habit. In fact thats true of a lot of fighters I think, there are some things you should probably not try to emulate because they are just habits they have developed because of their physiology or just their “pet” techniques so to speak.

IMO, doubling up on the straight is awkward as london pointed out, unless you’ve seriously hurt a fighter with the first shot, the time you’re taking to rechamber it for effect is leaving you open or giving him a chance to move. Even if he was hurt I’d probably rather step over on him and rake a hook across his head/body then go back to the straight. There’s plenty of examples of really great fighters doubling up on the cross, but if you watch closely they arent trying to land power shots, they arent turning the hip over… For example, Mayweather does it but he seems to be using it to search for a left hook or uppercut.

I have to agree with the others, I don’t see much benefit in doubling up the straight right, especially considering the other punches it sets you up for. Maybe early on as a feint, to get him looking high and right instead of low and left, but that’s about it. Even then, I think just mixing high and low hooks can keep him guessing, and do real damage too.

I like stepping into a lead hand uppercut after I had established the straight right - left hook rhythm. It didn’t always work (and it worked best on mma guys who seem to keep their hands wider), but when you do manage to split them right down the middle and land that uppercut on the chin it’s a beautiful thing.

I wanted to revisit this, because it’s something i’ve been looking at consciously since you bought it up in my own sparring. I’ve also unconsciously been encouraging several of my fighters to do something similar.

I want to qualify what I wrote about it being a fairly useless technique. It’s hard to tell from your post how basic you were talking on doubling up. As many of us believe, simply coming in straight with a double right is pretty ineffective, unless you are as gifted as a Mayweather or Pacquiao. That said, I think I actually double up on the right hand a decent amount in certain situations, with good success. However, the scenario I am talking about is where the second right hand is thrown as a counter, or after a step off to the side.

Scenario 1: I’m boxing on the outside, I throw a crisp 1-2 without much weight behind it, step off to the right and catch my opponent over the top of his lead shoulder as he is coming after my initial combo. This is more of a point scoring punch, but it puts you in a good position to catch your opponent off balance and either dig to his ribs, or maneuver him around the ring with your bodyweight.

Scenario 2: On the outside I throw a crisp 1-2, and then pat down my opponents jab with my right hand, throwing the right hand simultaneously. Mayweather does this very effectively. Learned it off him, and again, it’s a good point scorer and something they don’t usually see coming.

Scenario 3: I’m coming in from the outside, aggressively, trying to push you back and open you up for some short punches in close. An active jab on the outside, pumping it out, doubling, tripling etc, then stepping in hard behind a 1-2, blocking my opponent’s counter right with my lead forearm, stepping in again behind the block to crowd you out, then firing a short straight right in return, trying to catch you offbalance going backwards in response to my aggressive body movement.

Scenario 4: Again, looking to get on the inside, although more subtly. stepping in behind the 1-2, and taking half a step back and shoulder rolling the straight right (behind a high lead hand), before firing my right hand down the middle from a very good range.

I am able to use this particular technique very effectively, as it suits my style. I am not as good at pressure fighting, personally, and try to avoid it unless I am being outboxed.

Anyway, not quite the orthadox 1-2-2 we all thought you were talking about, but maybe stuff to put into practise, if you aren’t doing it already