T Nation

Opinions on these Numbers? 16 Y/O 181lbs


#1

I just recently tested my maxes and was wondering if I'd be considered a beginner or an intermediate. I am 16 y/0 weighing 181lbs.
Squat- 475 below parallel
Bench- 300 paused
Deadlift- 530


#2

Looks a lot stronger than beginner to me. But don’t worry too much about those labels because they don’t mean much. People that make it to the highest levels don’t care what people group them in, they just want to get better. Just compete and continue to get better than you were before.


#3

You are definitely strong for your age and size, there is no question about that. How long have you been training? What does your program look like?


#4

Those are almost elite numbers. Damn fine work.

But, uh, vids or it didn’t happen.


#5

As far as I know, no federations utilize a “beginner” or “intermediate” classification. Check the fed you want to compete in and you’ll see how those stack up. Might be a class I or master lifter.


#6

[quote]lift206 wrote:
Looks a lot stronger than beginner to me. But don’t worry too much about those labels because they don’t mean much. People that make it to the highest levels don’t care what people group them in, they just want to get better. Just compete and continue to get better than you were before.[/quote]
The only reason I want to know is because I want to see what kind of program to get on since I am pretty new to strength training.


#7

[quote]JayPierce wrote:
Those are almost elite numbers. Damn fine work.

But, uh, vids or it didn’t happen. [/quote]
The only camera I had on me was my phone which was playing music, but I will be testing my maxes again in 3 weeks after this training cycle so I will definately get videos then!


#8

I’ve been lifting weights for about 2 years now, but just started strength training for powerlifting a couple months ago. I’ve been utilizing the 5/3/1 system of training, but it is very low in volume and frequency so I’ve been looking for a new program to run.


#9

What are your weak points? If you’re serious about PLing and you’re looking to switch up your training program, it would make sense to focus on bringing those up.


#10

[quote]andy7411 wrote:
I’ve been lifting weights for about 2 years now, but just started strength training for powerlifting a couple months ago. I’ve been utilizing the 5/3/1 system of training, but it is very low in volume and frequency so I’ve been looking for a new program to run.[/quote]

Is 5/3/1 no longer working for you?


#11

[quote]andy7411 wrote:

[quote]lift206 wrote:
Looks a lot stronger than beginner to me. But don’t worry too much about those labels because they don’t mean much. People that make it to the highest levels don’t care what people group them in, they just want to get better. Just compete and continue to get better than you were before.[/quote]
The only reason I want to know is because I want to see what kind of program to get on since I am pretty new to strength training.[/quote]

Why not continue doing what you did to get to your current strength level and add a bit of volume as needed or add work to bring up a weakness? Being at some level of strength does not mean you should be doing a specific program. Some people use higher volume and some use lower volume but they do what works for them regardless of the label they’re given. How you perform the lift, how efficient you are in recruiting muscles, consistency in technique, time under tension, etc. all play a role in how much work is being done by the individual muscle fibers. This isn’t accounted for when looking only at the set/rep/weight scheme.

If 5/3/1 has worked, you can make small tweaks to it and it’ll be easier to learn how you respond if you make only one or two changes at a time. An example can be to add 1-2 back off sets. There really isn’t such a thing as a powerlifting program. Just train heavy with reps mostly around the 70-90% range and you should be good. Learn to taper off volume and peak intensity and you’ll be ready to display that strength on the platform.


#12

[quote]andy7411 wrote:
I’ve been lifting weights for about 2 years now, but just started strength training for powerlifting a couple months ago. I’ve been utilizing the 5/3/1 system of training, but it is very low in volume and frequency so I’ve been looking for a new program to run.[/quote]
You are definitely not a beginner with those numbers, more like intermediate-advanced. There is a 4 day program on Sheiko’s site which would probably be appropriate for you and all you have to do is put your numbers in. RTS is good too, but I have some issues with certain aspects and it might not be appropriate for everyone. There is a new book on JTS, “Scientific principles of strength training”, if you want to design your own program I can’t recommend that one enough. I was having some problems with my own training and after reading that I know just what I need to be doing, but for a young guy like you it might be a bit complicated. The biggest thing I got from it is phase potentiation - switch between strength and hypertrophy phases, doing both at the same time is inefficient and you will stall after a few months of one or the other.


#13

[quote]chris_ottawa wrote:

[quote]andy7411 wrote:
I’ve been lifting weights for about 2 years now, but just started strength training for powerlifting a couple months ago. I’ve been utilizing the 5/3/1 system of training, but it is very low in volume and frequency so I’ve been looking for a new program to run.[/quote]
You are definitely not a beginner with those numbers, more like intermediate-advanced. There is a 4 day program on Sheiko’s site which would probably be appropriate for you and all you have to do is put your numbers in. RTS is good too, but I have some issues with certain aspects and it might not be appropriate for everyone. There is a new book on JTS, “Scientific principles of strength training”, if you want to design your own program I can’t recommend that one enough. I was having some problems with my own training and after reading that I know just what I need to be doing, but for a young guy like you it might be a bit complicated. The biggest thing I got from it is phase potentiation - switch between strength and hypertrophy phases, doing both at the same time is inefficient and you will stall after a few months of one or the other.[/quote]
I was thinking about qualifying and competing in IPF Worlds next year in the subjunior division because I watched this year and the subjuniors numbers weren’t far off from mine. Do you think I would actually have a chance in placing? It’s not until June 2016.


#14

[quote]andy7411 wrote:

[quote]chris_ottawa wrote:

[quote]andy7411 wrote:
I’ve been lifting weights for about 2 years now, but just started strength training for powerlifting a couple months ago. I’ve been utilizing the 5/3/1 system of training, but it is very low in volume and frequency so I’ve been looking for a new program to run.[/quote]
You are definitely not a beginner with those numbers, more like intermediate-advanced. There is a 4 day program on Sheiko’s site which would probably be appropriate for you and all you have to do is put your numbers in. RTS is good too, but I have some issues with certain aspects and it might not be appropriate for everyone. There is a new book on JTS, “Scientific principles of strength training”, if you want to design your own program I can’t recommend that one enough. I was having some problems with my own training and after reading that I know just what I need to be doing, but for a young guy like you it might be a bit complicated. The biggest thing I got from it is phase potentiation - switch between strength and hypertrophy phases, doing both at the same time is inefficient and you will stall after a few months of one or the other.[/quote]
I was thinking about qualifying and competing in IPF Worlds next year in the subjunior division because I watched this year and the subjuniors numbers weren’t far off from mine. Do you think I would actually have a chance in placing? It’s not until June 2016.[/quote]

If you can qualify for worlds and can afford the flight and hotel then go for it! Even if you don’t get first place, just being there is an accomplishment. It depends on what country you are in, but basically you need
to qualify for nationals and if you have the highest total in your class you can go to IPF worlds, if there are other people ahead of you they get the first choice of whether or not to go to worlds. In the next year you can make a lot of progress, especially at your age.


#15

[quote]andy7411 wrote:
I was thinking about qualifying and competing in IPF Worlds next year in the subjunior division because I watched this year and the subjuniors numbers weren’t far off from mine. Do you think I would actually have a chance in placing? It’s not until June 2016.[/quote]

I’m sure you wouldn’t regret going regardless if you place or not. Many people dream of going there just to compete. I think it depends more on your financial situation. If that isn’t a problem then keep training hard for it.


#16

[quote]andy7411 wrote:

[quote]chris_ottawa wrote:

[quote]andy7411 wrote:
I’ve been lifting weights for about 2 years now, but just started strength training for powerlifting a couple months ago. I’ve been utilizing the 5/3/1 system of training, but it is very low in volume and frequency so I’ve been looking for a new program to run.[/quote]
You are definitely not a beginner with those numbers, more like intermediate-advanced. There is a 4 day program on Sheiko’s site which would probably be appropriate for you and all you have to do is put your numbers in. RTS is good too, but I have some issues with certain aspects and it might not be appropriate for everyone. There is a new book on JTS, “Scientific principles of strength training”, if you want to design your own program I can’t recommend that one enough. I was having some problems with my own training and after reading that I know just what I need to be doing, but for a young guy like you it might be a bit complicated. The biggest thing I got from it is phase potentiation - switch between strength and hypertrophy phases, doing both at the same time is inefficient and you will stall after a few months of one or the other.[/quote]
I was thinking about qualifying and competing in IPF Worlds next year in the subjunior division because I watched this year and the subjuniors numbers weren’t far off from mine. Do you think I would actually have a chance in placing? It’s not until June 2016.[/quote]

I’m confused. First you asked if you’re a ‘beginner or immediate’. Then you asked if your numbers are world class. What’s going on here? You have to understand that sounds pretty weird. You clearly already had an idea of how your numbers stand against world-class competition in your age range, and yet you would actually ask if your lifts are ‘beginner’ numbers?

Personally, I have no desire to comment further until you provide video evidence. Don’t take it personally, but when someone shows up claiming world class numbers, and offers no proof… skepticism is warranted.


#17

[quote]flipcollar wrote:

[quote]andy7411 wrote:

[quote]chris_ottawa wrote:

[quote]andy7411 wrote:
I’ve been lifting weights for about 2 years now, but just started strength training for powerlifting a couple months ago. I’ve been utilizing the 5/3/1 system of training, but it is very low in volume and frequency so I’ve been looking for a new program to run.[/quote]
You are definitely not a beginner with those numbers, more like intermediate-advanced. There is a 4 day program on Sheiko’s site which would probably be appropriate for you and all you have to do is put your numbers in. RTS is good too, but I have some issues with certain aspects and it might not be appropriate for everyone. There is a new book on JTS, “Scientific principles of strength training”, if you want to design your own program I can’t recommend that one enough. I was having some problems with my own training and after reading that I know just what I need to be doing, but for a young guy like you it might be a bit complicated. The biggest thing I got from it is phase potentiation - switch between strength and hypertrophy phases, doing both at the same time is inefficient and you will stall after a few months of one or the other.[/quote]
I was thinking about qualifying and competing in IPF Worlds next year in the subjunior division because I watched this year and the subjuniors numbers weren’t far off from mine. Do you think I would actually have a chance in placing? It’s not until June 2016.[/quote]

I’m confused. First you asked if you’re a ‘beginner or immediate’. Then you asked if your numbers are world class. What’s going on here? You have to understand that sounds pretty weird. You clearly already had an idea of how your numbers stand against world-class competition in your age range, and yet you would actually ask if your lifts are ‘beginner’ numbers?

Personally, I have no desire to comment further until you provide video evidence. Don’t take it personally, but when someone shows up claiming world class numbers, and offers no proof… skepticism is warranted.[/quote]

This. I’m not saying I don’t believe you, but I know myself how damn heavy that bench is simply because I doubt I could even unrack it - not to mention the squat and DL which are numbers at or just above the top end of my current range and I’m 14 years older than you are and about 20 lbs heavier, so my first reaction would be that if you’re hitting those numbers you don’t need to be asking the question in the first place.


#18

[quote]MarkKO wrote:

[quote]flipcollar wrote:

[quote]andy7411 wrote:

[quote]chris_ottawa wrote:

[quote]andy7411 wrote:
I’ve been lifting weights for about 2 years now, but just started strength training for powerlifting a couple months ago. I’ve been utilizing the 5/3/1 system of training, but it is very low in volume and frequency so I’ve been looking for a new program to run.[/quote]
You are definitely not a beginner with those numbers, more like intermediate-advanced. There is a 4 day program on Sheiko’s site which would probably be appropriate for you and all you have to do is put your numbers in. RTS is good too, but I have some issues with certain aspects and it might not be appropriate for everyone. There is a new book on JTS, “Scientific principles of strength training”, if you want to design your own program I can’t recommend that one enough. I was having some problems with my own training and after reading that I know just what I need to be doing, but for a young guy like you it might be a bit complicated. The biggest thing I got from it is phase potentiation - switch between strength and hypertrophy phases, doing both at the same time is inefficient and you will stall after a few months of one or the other.[/quote]
I was thinking about qualifying and competing in IPF Worlds next year in the subjunior division because I watched this year and the subjuniors numbers weren’t far off from mine. Do you think I would actually have a chance in placing? It’s not until June 2016.[/quote]

I’m confused. First you asked if you’re a ‘beginner or immediate’. Then you asked if your numbers are world class. What’s going on here? You have to understand that sounds pretty weird. You clearly already had an idea of how your numbers stand against world-class competition in your age range, and yet you would actually ask if your lifts are ‘beginner’ numbers?

Personally, I have no desire to comment further until you provide video evidence. Don’t take it personally, but when someone shows up claiming world class numbers, and offers no proof… skepticism is warranted.[/quote]

This. I’m not saying I don’t believe you, but I know myself how damn heavy that bench is simply because I doubt I could even unrack it - not to mention the squat and DL which are numbers at or just above the top end of my current range and I’m 14 years older than you are and about 20 lbs heavier, so my first reaction would be that if you’re hitting those numbers you don’t need to be asking the question in the first place. [/quote]
I just started doing more research into the actual sport of lifting. Thats why I found out how much other kids my age compare. I will be going for a rep PR on deadlift tonight and I’ll make sure to upload it!


#19

[quote]MarkKO wrote:

[quote]flipcollar wrote:

[quote]andy7411 wrote:

[quote]chris_ottawa wrote:

[quote]andy7411 wrote:
I’ve been lifting weights for about 2 years now, but just started strength training for powerlifting a couple months ago. I’ve been utilizing the 5/3/1 system of training, but it is very low in volume and frequency so I’ve been looking for a new program to run.[/quote]
You are definitely not a beginner with those numbers, more like intermediate-advanced. There is a 4 day program on Sheiko’s site which would probably be appropriate for you and all you have to do is put your numbers in. RTS is good too, but I have some issues with certain aspects and it might not be appropriate for everyone. There is a new book on JTS, “Scientific principles of strength training”, if you want to design your own program I can’t recommend that one enough. I was having some problems with my own training and after reading that I know just what I need to be doing, but for a young guy like you it might be a bit complicated. The biggest thing I got from it is phase potentiation - switch between strength and hypertrophy phases, doing both at the same time is inefficient and you will stall after a few months of one or the other.[/quote]
I was thinking about qualifying and competing in IPF Worlds next year in the subjunior division because I watched this year and the subjuniors numbers weren’t far off from mine. Do you think I would actually have a chance in placing? It’s not until June 2016.[/quote]

I’m confused. First you asked if you’re a ‘beginner or immediate’. Then you asked if your numbers are world class. What’s going on here? You have to understand that sounds pretty weird. You clearly already had an idea of how your numbers stand against world-class competition in your age range, and yet you would actually ask if your lifts are ‘beginner’ numbers?

Personally, I have no desire to comment further until you provide video evidence. Don’t take it personally, but when someone shows up claiming world class numbers, and offers no proof… skepticism is warranted.[/quote]

This. I’m not saying I don’t believe you, but I know myself how damn heavy that bench is simply because I doubt I could even unrack it - not to mention the squat and DL which are numbers at or just above the top end of my current range and I’m 14 years older than you are and about 20 lbs heavier, so my first reaction would be that if you’re hitting those numbers you don’t need to be asking the question in the first place. [/quote]
Here’s my rep PR from tonight. The first bumper plate is 25kg. This was done after my regular 5/3/1 set from the 3 rep week. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=stEAKXVIGiI


#20

Your technique looks pretty solid and only minor adjustments are needed. Other than that, the 5/3/1 program you have followed has worked in the past two years so I see no point in changing it if you haven’t stalled. It seems like you have a good handle on things so it would be better to come back when you really hit a plateau.

The programming doesn’t matter too much as long as you figure out adjustments to continue progressing. If the volume is low, add a back off set and make adjustments from there - nothing too drastic.

You’ve gotten strong doing what you’re doing and there isn’t a program you NEED to do when jumping into powerlifting. Just do at least a couple meets to learn what it’s like and how to prep for it.

You’re strong for your age and weight but that doesn’t mean it’s your limit so keep getting stronger to see how far you can push yourself. Don’t worry about the labels - those are distractions. Keep going at your own pace for gaining strength.