T Nation

Only Training One Muscle Group Hard?


#1

I want to get my hamstrings to grow faster because they are lagging behind other muscles. I have been thinking that will my hamstrings grow faster if I train them multiple times per week (eg. monday, wednesday, friday) and only do so called maintenance workout for other muscle groups where all of them are trained only once a week and at the same day.

Maintaining existing muscles doesn't need so much effort. This way I can put all my effort and recovery capacity to my hamstrings. Would this be a bad idea?


#2

How about trying something like this:


#3

Or this: https://www.T-Nation.com/workouts/build-your-backside-destroy-the-competition


#4

Get on a good program.

Be consistent.

Don’t sweat the small stuff


#5

Hams are a small muscle group. No need to put everything else on maintenance.


#6

you can absolutely train lagging muscles this way, and put everything else on a once-a-week maintenance workout. Nothing wrong with what you’re doing.


#7

[quote]Yogi wrote:
you can absolutely train lagging muscles this way, and put everything else on a once-a-week maintenance workout. Nothing wrong with what you’re doing.[/quote]

Dan John would disagree, but that is just one concept and philosophy.


#8

[quote]T-Force wrote:
Would this be a bad idea?

[/quote]

Likely an inefficient idea.


#9

[quote]BrickHead wrote:

[quote]T-Force wrote:
Would this be a bad idea?

[/quote]

Likely an inefficient idea. [/quote]

Well I’ve used something like this with many bodybuilders, including some who have competed on the Olympia stage and others who had national podiums.

I didn’t just train ONE muscle hard though.

For 4-6 weeks the emphasis was on 2 muscle groups which where trained 3x a week and the rest of the body was trained over 2 days. The volume was lower for these muscles but they were still trained hard, just with not as much volume.

I actually built entire bodies like this, switching focus points every 4 weeks. Worked great. But I only used this during dieting periods where there was a caloric restriction and thus the body couldn’t tolerate as much overall volume, calories were higher on the spec days.

This always allowed my competitors to gain muscle and strength while getting ready for a show.

However when in a state of caloric surplus it might not be the best approach, I would simply keep up with the same overall program and add bonus work for the hamstrings 2-3 times a week.


#10

[quote]JFG wrote:

[quote]Yogi wrote:
you can absolutely train lagging muscles this way, and put everything else on a once-a-week maintenance workout. Nothing wrong with what you’re doing.[/quote]

Dan John would disagree, but that is just one concept and philosophy. [/quote]

Dan only uses programs based on overall strength on big movements. WHICH IS WHAT I USE MYSELF TOO … most of the time. But it isn’t the best way to train for every purpose/goal.


#11

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]JFG wrote:

[quote]Yogi wrote:
you can absolutely train lagging muscles this way, and put everything else on a once-a-week maintenance workout. Nothing wrong with what you’re doing.[/quote]

Dan John would disagree, but that is just one concept and philosophy. [/quote]

Dan only uses programs based on overall strength on big movements. WHICH IS WHAT I USE MYSELF TOO … most of the time. But it isn’t the best way to train for every purpose/goal.[/quote]

Maybe, but unless he wants to train for a competition, it is absolutely useless. Your recent program (which I am in week 7) is proof of that.


#12

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

Well I’ve used something like this with many bodybuilders, including some who have competed on the Olympia stage and others who had national podiums.

I didn’t just train ONE muscle hard though.

For 4-6 weeks the emphasis was on 2 muscle groups which where trained 3x a week and the rest of the body was trained over 2 days. The volume was lower for these muscles but they were still trained hard, just with not as much volume.

I actually built entire bodies like this, switching focus points every 4 weeks. Worked great. But I only used this during dieting periods where there was a caloric restriction and thus the body couldn’t tolerate as much overall volume, calories were higher on the spec days.

This always allowed my competitors to gain muscle and strength while getting ready for a show.

However when in a state of caloric surplus it might not be the best approach, I would simply keep up with the same overall program and add bonus work for the hamstrings 2-3 times a week.[/quote]

Good post! Thanks for chiming in CT.

Of course people have brought up muscle groups like this. But from what I’ve seen, nearly all those who post these sorts of inquires on message boards are nowhere near the development of someone who needs such specialization for simple appearance or competition. And in many cases, the poster has such weaknesses simply because their programming is off and the muscle is not being trained with the right exercise for their structure, not being given priority by placing it in the middle or end of a workout, or with too little volume or frequency. Granted, early on, a discernible person can within months or the first year of training, see which muscles are going to be stubborn and which are going to grow and become stronger with ease, but I think someone should really put in some time before specialization.

You have far more knowledge and experience and development than I do, and ever will, but the way I see it is this. The formula for genetically ordinary people goes something like this, and I’ve posted it so many times. One can take notice that all the popular upper-lower splits like PHAT, Candito’s Hypertrophy, PHUL, even most of the 5/3/1 program, and Lyle McDonald’s GBR programs all follow this to a T or close to it.

Frequency: 2 x per week for each muscle, or a split that allows every 4 to 5 days
Number of exercises: 1 or 2 for each muscle, use nearly all compounds, except for arms, calves, and stubborn larger muscle groups
Sets: 2 to 4
Reps: mostly 6 to 8, 8 to 10, higher for arms and legs sometimes (total of 25 to 50 reps per muscle per workout)
Split: upper-lower, push-pull-legs, or whatever allows you to use the proper frequency

Add weight and reps over time and there is no way an ORDINARY frustrated bodybuilder is not going to grow, rather than mess around with advanced specialization and programming. I say this, because I am ordinary (maybe a tad bit better genetics than ordinary… maybe) and most of my life have been around mostly genetically ordinary men.


#13

[quote]T-Force wrote:
I want to get my hamstrings to grow faster because they are lagging behind other muscles. I have been thinking that will my hamstrings grow faster if I train them multiple times per week (eg. monday, wednesday, friday) and only do so called maintenance workout for other muscle groups where all of them are trained only once a week and at the same day.

Maintaining existing muscles doesn’t need so much effort. This way I can put all my effort and recovery capacity to my hamstrings. Would this be a bad idea?

[/quote]

Can you please post your current routine and a side shot of your thighs to see if you really need such specialization. What kind of weight are you handling on stiff legged deadlifts and squat variations? And at what height, weight, and degree of leanness?