T Nation

One-Arm Dumbbell Snatch?

I’ve never done them. Anywhere I can find a tutorial on how to do it? I’ve seen some videos, but I’m sure there are some things I can’t learn from watching a shitty you-tube video.

Now, I’ve never done any oly lifting, so should I get some training in those lifts first or can just jump into the single-limb work?

Find a USAW coach in your area if you are really interested in oly lifting.

It will be time and money well spent.

[quote]Chewie wrote:
Find a USAW coach in your area if you are really interested in oly lifting.

It will be time and money well spent.
[/quote]

How do I go about finding a coach I want to get serious in Olympic lifting. I looked up certified gyms but like there all northern california I’m in southern California and wondering if I can just find a coach to train me.

[quote]shizen wrote:
Chewie wrote:
Find a USAW coach in your area if you are really interested in oly lifting.

It will be time and money well spent.

How do I go about finding a coach I want to get serious in Olympic lifting. I looked up certified gyms but like there all northern california I’m in southern California and wondering if I can just find a coach to train me. [/quote]

Try this site:

http://www.msbn.tv/usavision/displayPage.aspx?id=730

A one-arm dumbbell snatch is really not that difficult. You don’t need a coach to teach you the lift.

There are some videos of the movement in several recent articles on T-Nation. I suggest checking them out.

As for performing the lift, it’s as simple as driving force from the legs/hips and exploding upward into the air. You can use a dumbbell, kbell or sandbag.

You’re better off doing traditional snatches since they require you to go into a full squat if you want to be good at them, they’re harder, and they’re safer for your shoulder (the catch portion is just asking for trouble).

Doing one arm snatches can be misleading because while you might think that if you can snatch a 70 pound dumbbell you can surely snatch a bar loaded with 135 pounds. Then you’ll try and you’ll fail.

Since you’re still using two legs for a one armed snatch you’re getting all the assistance from the legs that you’d get from a two armed snatch. So if your legs are responsible for moving 50 of those 70 pounds in the 1 armed snatch, they’re not going to suddenly move 100 of the 135 pounds in the two arm snatch.

And in my opinion trying to catch a heavy kettle bell is a great way to fuck up your wrist. If you do 1 armed snatches for some reason, just use a dumbbell.

[quote]Nate Dogg wrote:
A one-arm dumbbell snatch is really not that difficult. You don’t need a coach to teach you the lift.

There are some videos of the movement in several recent articles on T-Nation. I suggest checking them out.

As for performing the lift, it’s as simple as driving force from the legs/hips and exploding upward into the air. You can use a dumbbell, kbell or sandbag.[/quote]

Nice pics. This one of my favorite exercises to do, and it is relatively easy to learn. Use light weight at first, just to get used to the movement pattern, then increase the weight once you feel you have the form down.

[quote]FightingScott wrote:
And in my opinion trying to catch a heavy kettle bell is a great way to fuck up your wrist. If you do 1 armed snatches for some reason, just use a dumbbell. [/quote]

Only if you don’t know what you’re doing…

[quote]FightingScott wrote:
You’re better off doing traditional snatches since they require you to go into a full squat if you want to be good at them, they’re harder, and they’re safer for your shoulder (the catch portion is just asking for trouble).

Doing one arm snatches can be misleading because while you might think that if you can snatch a 70 pound dumbbell you can surely snatch a bar loaded with 135 pounds. Then you’ll try and you’ll fail.

Since you’re still using two legs for a one armed snatch you’re getting all the assistance from the legs that you’d get from a two armed snatch. So if your legs are responsible for moving 50 of those 70 pounds in the 1 armed snatch, they’re not going to suddenly move 100 of the 135 pounds in the two arm snatch.

And in my opinion trying to catch a heavy kettle bell is a great way to fuck up your wrist. If you do 1 armed snatches for some reason, just use a dumbbell. [/quote]

I like 1 arm dumbbell jerks and snatches

They help with shoulder stability IMO and are sometimes an event in strongman. Great movement

The 1 arm snatch is easy to learn IMO I had never done them and did it with 75lb DB just messing around one day.

What kind cardiovascular benefits can this lift have?

Would it be a good idea to add these say to a conditioning day along with kettlebell swings?

[quote]FightingScott wrote:
You’re better off doing traditional snatches since they require you to go into a full squat if you want to be good at them, they’re harder, and they’re safer for your shoulder (the catch portion is just asking for trouble). [/quote]

I disagree. Unless you are competing in Olympic lifting, there is no reason to learn how to perform a full snatch or clean and jerk.

Learning how to perform the one-arm movements will be easiest and quickest. Performing the “power” versions of each with a barbell from the hang position would be the next best thing and would suffice for most people wanting to use some variation of the Olympic lifts without needing a coach or having to spend too much time learning the proper technique.

Ive just searched on youtube for a good visual guide but to be honest - its rife with newly certified PT’s showing piss poor form.

Best example is here: - pinnaclestrengthandfitness.com/videogallery.html

and click on 1 arm dumbbell snatch with 150lb.

The pics above show receiving the sandbag in a full squat - you really want to be power snatching rather than full squat snatching to begin with.

[quote]Boris B wrote:
FightingScott wrote:
And in my opinion trying to catch a heavy kettle bell is a great way to fuck up your wrist. If you do 1 armed snatches for some reason, just use a dumbbell.

Only if you don’t know what you’re doing…
[/quote]

Agree.

[quote]Der Candy wrote:
What kind cardiovascular benefits can this lift have?

Would it be a good idea to add these say to a conditioning day along with kettlebell swings?[/quote]

Yes, they can be used as a conditioning workout. You can use them as circuits with other exercises or for sets of higher reps.

For example, Ross Enamait has a workout called “The Magic 50.” It’s short, intense, effective and tough.

  1. Dumbbell or Kbell snatches 5 per arm
  2. Dumbbell or Kbell swings 5 per arm
  3. Burpees x 10

Perform all exercises with no rest in between. Finish the circuit and rest 60 seconds. Perform a total of 5 sets.

If you are using a heavy dumbbell or kbell, this workout will be very tough.

[quote]Der Candy wrote:
What kind cardiovascular benefits can this lift have?

Would it be a good idea to add these say to a conditioning day along with kettlebell swings?[/quote]

I do them tabata style for conditioning. 8 x 20 second rounds of snatches with 10 seconds rest, alternating arms, roughly 4 x 9 each arm. I’ve worked up to 70 lbs.

Try this site also for tutorial of many lifts: www.bluecollarathlete.com/

I agree that they wouldn’t be that hard to learn. But even easier to learn would be one-arm dumbell muscle snatches. That version basically doesn’t include the overhead squat, if you can imagine that. I love those.

I can’t find a vid, but this one does contain a traditional two-arm muscle snatch. You’ll get the idea.

Oh and this remind me of the “dropping the weights” thread going on, because when I do these I drop the dumbells afterward. I wouldn’t really risk fucking my shoulder up trying to bring it down slow.

If you have never done olympic lifting before then dont do any isolation at first. Get the basic movements down with the bar then advanced to dumbbell. Snatches are terrible for your shoulders, why do you want to learn anyway?

I think Dan John’s From the Ground Up covers snatches.