Omega-3s: Lose fat, Get Abs, Gain Muscle

[quote]InGoditrst wrote:
Citing sources is important, particularly regarding information that is not well established as fact by the scientific and public communities. However, citations are not required and are elementary when accompanying common knowledge in the scientific and public communities unless adding new information to or disputing well-established facts.

However, I noticed one unkind response is based on the fact this information has little or no value to the fitness community because this information is so widely known. Hence, citations are of little value or consequence to the average reader because these facts are well established in the community (really?).

On the other hand, several other unkind responses to this article imply this information is of little value because it is not supported by reference to scientific studies. Which is it? Common knowledge or little known facts that need scientific support to lend credibility to the writer?s conclusions. Pick one argument because it cannot be both.

However, first let me say that this article is of great value. In fact, it’s as valuable as the thousands of articles that repeat over and over how much protein/carbs/fats fitness enthusiast require and more valuable than the “countless articles on this website stating all of the above” for two simple reasons. One, it’s valuable to TNation because it captured at least one seeking reader to this cite: me. The other articles did not because I did not encounter them on my journey to and through this cite. And two, because although I’ve read a book on Omega-3, this information reminded me that Omega 3 helps gain muscle and loose fat. Probably because the most salient benefit of omega 3 is reducing inflammation. So this information was of value to me, a TNation reader. And three, this article prompted further conversation and points to think about.

Second, while it is true that this writer does need to cite sources because these facts are not common knowledge (yes, he should know that being educated with at least an undergrad degree), However, all members (particularly administration) of this cite should be driven to help others including newbies, those experienced and the contributors, not to alienate them. That said, I am truly surprised at the personally destructive nature of the rudeness above.

In conclusion, shouldn’t the goal be to add value to the TNation community? Doesn’t that include helping to educate, lift, and engage contributors? Wouldn’t kind advice do a better job of building a community that others want to be a part of? Attacking others is so… uncivilized. Or is it, childish, uneducated, and unprofessional. I can tell you one thing; it likely is effectively alienating readers because no one wants to be attacked or see others attacked by high and mighty contributors. Most of us are attracted to online communities that lift others.

Thanks Andrew![/quote]

Part of adding value to the T Nation community is being honest with the posters who comprise it. Regardless of how well-intentioned (or supposedly well-intentioned) a poster may be, it is nothing but a disservice to that poster to support him/her unconditionally even he/she is doing things that are counterproductive to his/her personal development or the development of others.

It’s not like the OP just threw out an off-hand recommendation that said “hey, you might want to give X supplement or Y training technique a try because it worked for me and it might help you too.” He presented facts or what he declares to be such in the form of an article, and part of doing that is justifying fact.

If the ‘article’ was purely comprised of widely acknowledged information that was unquestionable, the OP should ask himself if it was worth writing in the first place (since it wasn’t really adding anything new to the nutrition discourse). If he was in fact adding new information to the discourse on nutrition, then the onus is on him to justify that information with real data. And if the OP intended to simply compile a collection of previously acknowledged nutrition-related facts in a novel way to act as a summary, he still needs to cite sources because he didn’t create that information (scholarly integrity 101).

Supporting those who are doing the right things regardless of where they may be in their training or personal development is one thing. Overlooking their mistakes in the name of ‘maintaining a positive community’ or something is another. Presenting unjustified information as fact doesn’t help anyone. It encourages poor authorship by allowing authors to make recommendations without being damn sure they are good ones, and encourages poor readership by teaching readers to blindly accept recommendations without trying to understand what kind of science underlies them.

Sometimes supporting someone in their efforts to do something (such as help other with fitness goals) requires informing that person of his/her flaws.

[quote]flipcollar wrote:

[quote]MattyG35 wrote:
chillain, I think Andrew made another account. Quite the coincidence that a white knight happened to be galloping by to rescue him from all the T-dragons and T-ogres.
[/quote]

Yep. Always beware first-time posters with brand-new accounts.[/quote]

Yep I figured as much.

(Also figured that Andrew might could use a little coddling after all the “tough love” he’d already received :slight_smile:

[quote]bigmac73nh wrote:
Supporting those who are doing the right things regardless of where they may be in their training or personal development is one thing. Overlooking their mistakes in the name of ‘maintaining a positive community’ or something is another. Presenting unjustified information as fact doesn’t help anyone. It encourages poor authorship by allowing authors to make recommendations without being damn sure they are good ones, and encourages poor readership by teaching readers to blindly accept recommendations without trying to understand what kind of science underlies them.

Sometimes supporting someone in their efforts to do something (such as help other with fitness goals) requires informing that person of his/her flaws. [/quote]

Well said, bigmac.

Hi Andrew. I recently started taking fish oil. But I ended up very often feeling light headed and tired. I needed 10 hours of sleep per night and when I went to lift I would get out of breath easily. When I was out of breath I became light headed and had to sit/kneel down to recover. I stopped taking the fish oil and within a few days I was back to normal, energetic, and I was not getting light headed or anything when I was out of breath. I’m thinking that the fish oil was dropping my blood pressure too much. While using the fish oil I once tested my BP at 147/52. Recently I tested it at 148/61. Was the fish oil dropping my diastolic too much and giving me trouble or is there another explanation? Moreover, would you not recommend fish oil to someone like me (kind of low diastolic BP)?

fish oil underrated?