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OMAD Diet with Fasted Training, Heavy Lifting

I’ll assume she doesn’t read this site…!

100%. (And my feelings don’t get hurt - don’t worry). I definitely don’t give it a roll anymore. I actually fell into it naturally for awhile, because I didn’t like thinking about eating all day, but then I also was not mindful at all when I did eat and I just didn’t do it well. I’m not a OMAD dude!

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I’ve considered doing this but it’s not really compatible for my current goals.

I do plan on losing some bodyfat in the future, and this seems like how I’d do it.

Do you plan short sessions with low volume/low rep/set ranges?

I did a stint of a 19/5 fasting 4 days a week.

4:00pm was intra workout shake. 20g EAA, 3g citruline, 5g glutamine.

5:30: 50g whey isolate, 8oz 96/4 beef, 1cup basmati rice

8:30: 8oz chicken, veggies, avocado slices, 50g casein.

Dropped fat like crazy.

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I train 4/5 times a week.

No program. Just doing whatever I want to do that day. Could be lots of reps or working up to 5rms

If you’re looking to get rid of some chub then this is cutting on cheat mode

As lean as I’ve ever been

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So, your OMAD is also a Keto diet

I wouldn’t say keto. That’s too much hard work, counting macros and shit. I haven’t really got the time.

In saying that it’s very low carb I would think.

Basically most days I have a big bowl of

Lettuce
Tomatoes
Spinach
Walnuts
Feta cheese
Olives
Chilli
Sour cream

All mixed in

Usually finished of with a bowl of Greek yoghurt.

Having the same meal most days keeps me right.

Optimising nutrition seems like the most neurotic thing to me. Life should be about making good choices. Not measuring every fucking nutrient to make yourself feel all good about yourself.

OMAD is conducive to that mindset plus I buy into the concept.

Our ancestors would have killed for one meal a day. They most likely did actually😂

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I agree with what your saying, measuring and tracking everything is like a part time job.

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Would be interested in hearing more about how you guys time this around training and what that one meal looks like.

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I’d be interested in what the training looks like

No meat ?

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The chilli has a 1/2 pound of ground beef in there.

Ignore my ignorance.

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Who’s training?

Mine?

Which health markers? What do you think are the main hormonal differences with time restricted eating? In my case, 16:8 or 18:6 suck. I tend to gain bodyfat when I eat 1-2 large meals in a 6-8 hour window.

I suspect that having long fasting periods improves metabolic flexibility which is primarily the body’s ability to turn to fat, or gluconeogenesis or ketones as energy sources since each of these require specific enzymes that get upregulated. I have been reviewing metabolic pathways recently and apparently each glucogenic amino acid has its own enzyme or even group of enzymes that is responsible for turning it into pyruvate to provide materials for gluconeogenesis. Each of those enzymes gets downregulated with disuse which got me thinking that people probably get more efficient with autophagy if they fast regularly since those enzymes will stay upregulated. Most metabolic pathways up and down regulate over periods of 3-10 days.

I think that there are people who get a more pronounced cortisol release with fasting and end up being temporarily hormonally insulin resistant from the cortisol/adrenaline/glucagon getting turned up by fasting. Then they eat a big meal and tend to deposit it as fat because of the high counterregulatory hormone levels, so OMAD may not work for people who make a lot of cortisol during a fast, or even who rely on stimulants to get through zero calorie periods. So I think some people who are more stressed by fasting do better eating multiple small meals. If fasting makes it hard to fall asleep it is probably because of elevated stress hormones. Others don’t have a pronounced stress hormone response to fasting. Granted, slipping into ketosis and becoming an efficient fat burner are likely to turn down the stress hormones. So OMAD on high carbs may backfire by keeping people more glucose dependent. Becoming a fat burner and also de-stressing may help people respond to calorie restriction better. Hard intense training, can also boost counter-regulatories.

Anyone doing OMAD with fasted training

Studies involving humans: insulin sensitivity, blood pressure, oxidative stress.

Recent studies in mice by Satchin Panda appears to show even greater health benefits. Google it for the lowdown.

And what’s supposed to be different about it? You can do whatever training you are doing normally. It’s just apparently not advised to do fasted training for longer than 1 hour according to some studies (however don’t quote me on that, inb4 it happens that these studies were misinterpreted or something, as it commonly happens to be with studies these days), so just for safety, I hit a protein shake + some carbs after I hit 1 hour in the gym. There’s nothing special about fasted training and OMAD.

I’ve tried with many permutations prior to strongman type sessions: 36 hours water-fasted; exogenous ketones; C8 (MCT) oil; protein loading the previous evening; carbs previous evening, carbs pre-WO, etc, and, trust me, there is a huge difference between total fasting and the rest.

In my opinion, lower rep strength sessions with longer rest periods fit well with total fasting. Not much else does.

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I’ve read that you need leucine/protein every four to six hours to trigger mtor and muscle growth. There was a layne norton article and a few others. Personally I love omad. Pack some water and head out the door. I have a bcaa and greens drink on the way home from work and then eat my meal.

I think mps is better stimulated when there’s a refractory period between feedings of protein. I’d ditch the bcaa’s though. Seem unnecessary