T Nation

Olympic Lifting Program?


#1

Hi Coach, can you post a Oly Lifting program?? like 915,russian strength skil, etc... Or give me some guidelines to create a program... thx!


#2

[quote]MVN wrote:
Hi Coach, can you post a Oly Lifting program?? like 915,russian strength skil, etc… Or give me some guidelines to create a program… thx![/quote]

The problem is that it depends on your level of skills as well as your weak links/technical flaws.


#3

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]MVN wrote:
Hi Coach, can you post a Oly Lifting program?? like 915,russian strength skil, etc… Or give me some guidelines to create a program… thx![/quote]

The problem is that it depends on your level of skills as well as your weak links/technical flaws.[/quote]

Just chiming in. How about a novice skill level? Would you say that novices should train the full movements, or train the various portions of the movement separately?


#4

[quote]TX iron wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]MVN wrote:
Hi Coach, can you post a Oly Lifting program?? like 915,russian strength skil, etc… Or give me some guidelines to create a program… thx![/quote]

The problem is that it depends on your level of skills as well as your weak links/technical flaws.[/quote]

Just chiming in. How about a novice skill level? Would you say that novices should train the full movements, or train the various portions of the movement separately?

[/quote]

Again… it depends on skill level. “Novice” as in starting to training specifically for Olympic lifting performance (thus implying that technique on the full competitive lifts is decent) or “novice” as in just starting to learn the lifts.

I don’t want to be obtuse, but you can’t use the same program for someone who isn’t efficient at the full lifts as with someone who is.

For example a lot of guys/girls transitioning to Olympic lifting from Crossfit or college sports often lift more on the power snatch/clean than on the full squat versions. That’s because their strength and power is a lot superior to their technical efficiency.

You can’t plan the training the same way for them as for someone with a more normal ratio of the “squat variations” of the lifts being 12-15% stronger that the “power variations”.

It’s much more complex to design a training plan that will work with people of various levels for olympic lifting than it is for powerlifting. While technical efficiency is somewhat important in powerlifting, it’s much easier to be close to perfect technique on the squat, deadlift and bench press than on the snatch and clean & jerk.


#5

[quote]TX iron wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]MVN wrote:
Hi Coach, can you post a Oly Lifting program?? like 915,russian strength skil, etc… Or give me some guidelines to create a program… thx![/quote]

The problem is that it depends on your level of skills as well as your weak links/technical flaws.[/quote]

Just chiming in. How about a novice skill level? Would you say that novices should train the full movements, or train the various portions of the movement separately?

[/quote]

But to answer your question I believe that novice should work up to the full lifts as quickly as possible, without learning bad motor habits.

You first use drills, which are segmented portions of the full lifts, to learn the proper technique, rhythm and timing. And then when you understand the task you have to do, you should focus on drilling the full lifts.

As you get more advanced you will find weak links in your lifts, either strength or technique related. At that point you begin to include more segmented lifts to correct those weak areas.

So to be clear…

STEP 1. Emphasis on segmented lifts to learn the technique, feel and rhythm of the full lifts. The goal being to move to the full lifts as quickly as possible without using bad technique.

STEP 2. Strong emphasis on the full lifts. You can do lifts from the hang or blocks, but I recommend NOT DOING ANY “POWER” VARIATIONS as you are focusing on mastering perfect technique on the full lifts.

STEP 3. When your technique on the full lifts is efficient, automatic and stable you reintroduce segmented and power variations of the lifts to correct specific technical issues or weaknesses.


#6

One of the biggest mistake novice make IMHO is to do too much “power variations” (power snatch, power clean). If you are an athlete and using the Olympic lifts to build power, that’s fine. But if your goal is to become good at the actual Olympic lifts you should avoid the power variations until you are very good at the full lifts.

The power variations are more forgiving and lack the transition under the bar. Someone who does more power than full squat lifts will always be inefficient at the full lifts.


#7

Thank you VERY much for your detailed response. There’s so much information out there and what you said really focuses in and clarifies it. Ideally, I’d like to compete in Crossfit competitions at some point. Currently I’ve been practicing the lifts before my powerlifts. By novice, I mean I understand some of the principles behind the movements, watched videos, etc, but am really just muscling the weights up once they get “heavy”, and have only begun practicing them over the last couple of months. I’d like to progress my supertotal.

For 3 days/week a week I was thinking…

Day 1
Snatch practice (segments -->full lifts—>segments)
Squat variation
Bench variation

Day 2
Clean & jerk practice (same as snatch)
Deadlift variation
overhead press variation

Day 3
Snatch practice (same as above 2, albeit a different focus than day 1 in terms of segments)
Squat variation
Bench variation

Apologies if I’m thread-jacking or anything, this thread was just too similar to what I was contemplating.


#8

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:
One of the biggest mistake novice make IMHO is to do too much “power variations” (power snatch, power clean). If you are an athlete and using the Olympic lifts to build power, that’s fine. But if your goal is to become good at the actual Olympic lifts you should avoid the power variations until you are very good at the full lifts.

The power variations are more forgiving and lack the transition under the bar. Someone who does more power than full squat lifts will always be inefficient at the full lifts.[/quote]

This is very true. One of the “best” things that happened to my lifting was I had back surgery. The disc injury also caused some nerve damage that weakened my right quad. Result: I had to come back very slowly and with light weight. I figured since I was forced to go light I would take the time to improve my snatch technique and do full snatches with light weight. What I discovered was that I was not stable in the overhead squat position which was a result of my having just done power snatches because I could use more weight on the power snatch. A 40 kg full snatch was a challenge (this was a weight I could easily muscle snatch). I now full snatch all my lifts, even the warm ups, and focus on doing more overhead squats.