T Nation

Older Adults w/ NSAIDs Adapt Faster to Training

curious as this contradicts results from younger adults. Thoughts?

Perhaps there is a happy medium wrt the amount of inflammation in your body for maximum gains.
Older people with more inflammation get it reduced to that of a younger person, while a younger person taking NSAIDs gets their inflammation levels reduced too much.(?) Just my thoughts.

I would want to know if the study was done on “experienced” lifters or noobs.

[quote]AccipiterQ wrote:

curious as this contradicts results from younger adults. Thoughts? [/quote]

I am thinking they train more effectively because they would otherwise hurt.

Getting old is not for pansies.

[quote]Jewbacca wrote:

[quote]AccipiterQ wrote:

curious as this contradicts results from younger adults. Thoughts? [/quote]

I am thinking they train more effectively because they would otherwise hurt.

Getting old is not for pansies.[/quote]

JB would know. :slight_smile:

I am in the same boat. I am now 36 and it takes a lot longer to recover from weights. I used to do full body workouts every other day, now I do single body part splits, and it take the entire week to recover.

See this recent article on T-Nation: http://www.T-Nation.com/free_online_article/most_recent/do_pain_pills_impair_muscle_growth

It does a good job of aggregating some of the very confusing state of the research on this issue.

“If these findings aren’t confusing enough, consider that several recent studies have investigated the long-term effects of NSAID administration on muscle growth in humans. None of these studies found a negative effect on muscle hypertrophy (8, 14, 20). In fact, one of them showed that NSAIDs actually increased muscle hypertrophy by approximately 50% (20).”

[quote]Jewbacca wrote:

[quote]AccipiterQ wrote:

curious as this contradicts results from younger adults. Thoughts? [/quote]

I am thinking they train more effectively because they would otherwise hurt.

Getting old is not for pansies.[/quote]

Haha, this could actually be the case, considering tylenol is not an NSAID and it actually worked slightly better than the ibuprofen in the study.

[quote]MattyG35 wrote:
Perhaps there is a happy medium wrt the amount of inflammation in your body for maximum gains.
Older people with more inflammation get it reduced to that of a younger person, while a younger person taking NSAIDs gets their inflammation levels reduced too much.(?) Just my thoughts.[/quote]

astute thinking young chap

[quote]MattyG35 wrote:
Perhaps there is a happy medium wrt the amount of inflammation in your body for maximum gains.
Older people with more inflammation get it reduced to that of a younger person, while a younger person taking NSAIDs gets their inflammation levels reduced too much.(?) Just my thoughts.[/quote]

Can’t draw that conclusion, at least not from this study. The tylenol was slightly more effective than the ibuprofen, and tylenol has no practically no anti-inflammatory effect.