T Nation

Old Testament Quotes

8 Ask of me,
and I will make the nations your inheritance,
the ends of the earth your possession.

9 You will rule them with an iron scepter [f] ;
you will dash them to pieces like pottery."

Seems to be saying: if you sre a Jew, you can rule the rest of the world with an ‘iron scepter’, since they don’t except your religion. Pretty sad stuff.

I take it you haven’t ever read the old testament? It’s more of a story book than a self-help book.

If you want to know how Jews interpret it, read the Talmud, Rashi & Maimonidies

Starts with “Ask of me” so I’m assuming this was meant to be a type of test or temptation? Or perhaps it was interpreted as such…

Bah. The Old Testament disgusts me.

when do the goat sacrifices start?

FYI, you took that from Psalms–the book of poetry, song, praise and lament. It’s a literary and music collection from the kings and judges of the OT. It’s supposed to be over the top.

[quote]Aragorn wrote:
FYI, you took that from Psalms–the book of poetry, song, praise and lament. It’s a literary and music collection from the kings and judges of the OT. It’s supposed to be over the top.[/quote]

but when you take things of of context, then you can make up all sorts of fun things!

[quote]PB-Crawl wrote:
Aragorn wrote:
FYI, you took that from Psalms–the book of poetry, song, praise and lament. It’s a literary and music collection from the kings and judges of the OT. It’s supposed to be over the top.

but when you take things of of context, then you can make up all sorts of fun things![/quote]

I’m well aware of that. But the book is fairly obviously labeled as such. It’s not like you had to search the surrounding text for context or historical happenings or scholars exegesis. You could easily do better than this attempt if you were looking for dark and dangerous verses from the OT. This is just sad. It’s cut-rate troll work.

If you’re going to work on opening controversy and flame wars, you might as well take some pride in your work.

[quote]shookers wrote:
I take it you haven’t ever read the old testament? It’s more of a story book than a self-help book.

If you want to know how Jews interpret it, read the Talmud, Rashi & Maimonidies[/quote]

OK. I checked out Rashi, who ties it perfectly to the Davidic legen. But it would not paste in.
(It provides a lot of Old French etymologie, BTW)

Easy one.
The Psalmist does a confusing trick; God is addressing both wicked nations and David simultaneously. The warning and promise, however, are divided. If the rebellious nations do not reform, the anointed King (David and his eternal progeny) may (not will) serve as the scourge and punishment.
(If one imposes the Christian message on this psalm, Christ is the chosen King.)
HH can presumably read some English; where he derives his benighted interpretation is anyone’s guess.

Note two elegant literary tricks from the Bronze Age (which Rashi does not mention): God dwells in heaven but Mount Zion is “His,” the epicenter of the Holy. Also the use of the word “happy”–in Old French, “felicements”–echoes the first line of Ps 1, roughly, “Happy is the man who has not followed the counsel of the wicked.” (This applies prophetically to HeadHunter) (Compare to Ps 2 “Happy are all who take refuge in Him,” with the understanding that Zion was the ultimate refuge.)

Now, Beowulf, how can this disgust you?

There’s a lot of shit in both halves of the bible. A good way to be put off religion is to read the Bible properly I feel.

But yeah, the OT, wow. The god of that book is one of the most selfish, petty, insecure, childish, brutal, bloodthirsty and insane characters in all of fiction. The god of the NT isn’t much better.

[quote]DrSkeptix wrote:
shookers wrote:
I take it you haven’t ever read the old testament? It’s more of a story book than a self-help book.

If you want to know how Jews interpret it, read the Talmud, Rashi & Maimonidies

OK. I checked out Rashi, who ties it perfectly to the Davidic legen. But it would not paste in.
(It provides a lot of Old French etymologie, BTW)

Easy one.
The Psalmist does a confusing trick; God is addressing both wicked nations and David simultaneously. The warning and promise, however, are divided. If the rebellious nations do not reform, the anointed King (David and his eternal progeny) may (not will) serve as the scourge and punishment.
(If one imposes the Christian message on this psalm, Christ is the chosen King.)
HH can presumably read some English; where he derives his benighted interpretation is anyone’s guess.

Note two elegant literary tricks from the Bronze Age (which Rashi does not mention): God dwells in heaven but Mount Zion is “His,” the epicenter of the Holy. Also the use of the word “happy”–in Old French, “felicements”–echoes the first line of Ps 1, roughly, “Happy is the man who has not followed the counsel of the wicked.” (This applies prophetically to HeadHunter) (Compare to Ps 2 “Happy are all who take refuge in Him,” with the understanding that Zion was the ultimate refuge.)

Now, Beowulf, how can this disgust you?

[/quote]

I didn’t say this particular part disgusted me, just the whole book. And yes, I’ve read most of it.

Lessee, the part where a man offers his daughters to be raped by the city so the angels of God won’t see how horrible the city has become is up there on my disgust-o-meter. As is the part where the 400 year old man commits incest with his two daughters in a cave for seemingly no reason. God turning a couple of cities into dust for little reason, and then turning someone into salt because he dared WATCH God do something violent ranks up there as well. And all the passages about beating your wife and how women should never, under any circumstances disobey or hold power over men. Yeah. Plenty to render some very potent disgust.

And my name is BeowOlf. O not u. Nothing to do with the poem or movie, thanks ;).

[quote]Jab1 wrote:

But yeah, the OT, wow. The god of that book is one of the most selfish, petty, insecure, childish, brutal, bloodthirsty and insane characters in all of fiction. [/quote]

Ildaboath, amoral lesser god, according to occultists.

[quote]Beowolf wrote:
DrSkeptix wrote:
shookers wrote:
I take it you haven’t ever read the old testament? It’s more of a story book than a self-help book.

If you want to know how Jews interpret it, read the Talmud, Rashi & Maimonidies

OK. I checked out Rashi, who ties it perfectly to the Davidic legen. But it would not paste in.
(It provides a lot of Old French etymologie, BTW)

Easy one.
The Psalmist does a confusing trick; God is addressing both wicked nations and David simultaneously. The warning and promise, however, are divided. If the rebellious nations do not reform, the anointed King (David and his eternal progeny) may (not will) serve as the scourge and punishment.

(If one imposes the Christian message on this psalm, Christ is the chosen King.)
HH can presumably read some English; where he derives his benighted interpretation is anyone’s guess.

Note two elegant literary tricks from the Bronze Age (which Rashi does not mention): God dwells in heaven but Mount Zion is “His,” the epicenter of the Holy. Also the use of the word “happy”–in Old French, “felicements”–echoes the first line of Ps 1, roughly, “Happy is the man who has not followed the counsel of the wicked.”

(This applies prophetically to HeadHunter) (Compare to Ps 2 “Happy are all who take refuge in Him,” with the understanding that Zion was the ultimate refuge.)

Now, Beowulf, how can this disgust you?

I didn’t say this particular part disgusted me, just the whole book. And yes, I’ve read most of it.

Lessee, the part where a man offers his daughters to be raped by the city so the angels of God won’t see how horrible the city has become is up there on my disgust-o-meter.

As is the part where the 400 year old man commits incest with his two daughters in a cave for seemingly no reason. God turning a couple of cities into dust for little reason, and then turning someone into salt because he dared WATCH God do something violent ranks up there as well.

And all the passages about beating your wife and how women should never, under any circumstances disobey or hold power over men. Yeah. Plenty to render some very potent disgust.

And my name is BeowOlf. O not u. Nothing to do with the poem or movie, thanks ;).

[/quote]

Life in the Bronze Age was something less than wonderful. You are a happy Cornell freshman taking Comp Lit., perhaps. Compare away…
Did you expect the OT to reflect the self-indulgement narcissism of, say 1966?

The greed and rapacity of the Homeric legends?
Each of your examples bears felicitous re-examination. But allow me one criticism of your reading, friend BeowOlf: you understand little of the powerful women who appear in–and wrote–the OT.

I guess the OT is kind of like an ancient rap song, like about killing cops and beating women, or calling Gentiles ‘swine’ and non-Jews ‘Goyim’ (cattle).

Now what would happen if a select few of angry Jews (kinda like the terrorists of Islam) decided to crush the world, by buying it? Maybe we could call them Zionists.

[quote]Headhunter wrote:
I guess the OT is kind of like an ancient rap song, like about killing cops and beating women, or calling Gentiles ‘swine’ and non-Jews ‘Goyim’ (cattle).

Now what would happen if a select few of angry Jews (kinda like the terrorists of Islam) decided to crush the world, by buying it? Maybe we could call them Zionists.

[/quote]

If the small population of Jews can outwit us all, buying up and then running the world…well, they deserve to run the world.

[quote]DrSkeptix wrote:
Life in the Bronze Age was something less than wonderful. You are a happy Cornell freshman taking Comp Lit., perhaps. Compare away…
Did you expect the OT to reflect the self-indulgement narcissism of, say 1966?

The greed and rapacity of the Homeric legends?
Each of your examples bears felicitous re-examination. But allow me one criticism of your reading, friend BeowOlf: you understand little of the powerful women who appear in–and wrote–the OT.

[/quote]

Comp Lit? Nah, I read the OT on my own years ago.

You realize Homer’s epics aren’t religious texts that are used by millions to guide their morals and way of thinking… yes?

And yes, I know there are powerful women in the OT. That still doesn’t excuse the LITERAL rule making that is presented by many of the authors. Rules that include women being totally subservient to men, among other things.

Look, the Bible has plenty of good, moral stories that I plan on telling my kids, right along next to any and all other fables. Because that is how I treat them, like good fables.

But the rest of the book, well, not so much.