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Ok, Here's the Diet of MASS for Me!

Alright, here’s my diet at the minute; have had to constantly increase the cals until I’ve seen weight go on…Stats, 20 y.o. male, 5ft 11, 124lbs. It’s got me gaining 2lbs a week at the minute…

I prefer to eat whole foods, not rely on shakes, so havn’t included any…

6.30am
Scrambled Eggs (2 Whites, 2 Whole)
2 Pieces Wholemeal Toast
Half Cup of Oats
Small Banana
Apple
Large Glass of Water w/ 5g Creatine and 5g Glutamine
578 cals/ 33p/ 84c/ 13f

Gym; 8.00 - 9.30am

During Training
Gatorade w/ 5g Creatine and 5g Glutamine
120 cals/ 0p/ 30c/ 0f

10.00am
Scrambled Eggs (4 Whites, 2 Wholes)
Cup of Oats
Tub of Fat-Free Greek Yoghurt
Apple
Pear
582 cals/ 49p/ 66c/ 14f

1.00pm
Tuna Sandwich w/ Red Onion and Lettuce on 2 Slices Wholemeal Bread
Tub of Fat-Free Greek Yoghurt
Handful of Almonds
Pear
549 cals/ 53p/ 63c/ 11f

3.30pm
Trek Bar
216 cals/ 11p/ 45c/ 4f

5.00pm
Grilled Turkey Breast w/ Mustard
2 Small Sweet Potatoes
Carrots and Broccoli
Half a Small Avocado
548 cals/ 42p/ 58c/ 16f

7.30pm
Salmon Sandwich w/ Cream Cheese, d Lettuce on 2 Slices Wholemeal Bread
Tin of Vegetable Soup
Pear
542 cals/ 43p/ 70c/ 11f

9.30pm
Scrambled Eggs (2 Whites, 2 Whole)
2 Pieces Wholemeal Toast
Half Cup of Oats
Apple
543 cals/ 33p/ 75c/ 13f

10.30pm (Bedtime)
Tub of Fat-Free Cottage Cheese
2 Tbsp Peanut Butter
Tub of Fat-Free Greek Yoghurt w/ Tbsp Mixed Seeds or Flax
Apple
525 cals/ 55p/ 31c/ 20f

Total;
4203 Calories
319g Protein (30%)
522g Carbohydrates (50%)
102g Fat (20%)

What do you guys think?? Any opinions/ thoughts greatly appreciated!

That certainly is a mass gaining diet. I believe a typical person’s maintenance caloric intake will be around 15 times their body weight in pounds. So yours I would guess would a little under 1900 Kcal, which you are currently eating over double that. I am not going to tell you to cut back as you have chosen pretty healthy foods there, but watch the weight you are gaining.

If you feel gaining a lot of fat consider cutting back on the calories a bit. You could also consider cycling caloric intake, more on training days less on off days. But you seem to have written up a good diet to start with. Good luck

[quote]SolidGround wrote:
That certainly is a mass gaining diet. I believe a typical person’s maintenance caloric intake will be around 15 times their body weight in pounds. So yours I would guess would a little under 1900 Kcal, which you are currently eating over double that. I am not going to tell you to cut back as you have chosen pretty healthy foods there, but watch the weight you are gaining.

If you feel gaining a lot of fat consider cutting back on the calories a bit. You could also consider cycling caloric intake, more on training days less on off days. But you seem to have written up a good diet to start with. Good luck[/quote]

I am making sure to cycle my calories- I eat 1000 more on training days than on rest days

How the hell do you enjoy life eating this way when BULKING? I can’t imagine what your cutting diet must look like…

Also, on a sidenote, in my opinion calorie cycling is a bad idea… especially the concept of eating severely less calories on non-training days - hint: those are the days your muscles are actually recovering and using a surplus of nutrients to rebuild and grow larger. Why deprive them?

A few thing jump out at me.

1.) You have no protein around your workout, only Gatorade. Throw a whey shake in with that.

2.) Why do the words “small” and “fat-free” keep showing up? The only thing labeled “large” is a glass of water.

3.) Also, I’m not so excited about the fat breakdown.

4.) Red meat is pretty dang awesome. Why do you not have it in there?

However; you you’re finally eating then I think it’s a BIG step in the right direction. Good luck and I really hope you stick with it!

Lol, I’ve never had to cut before, so I’ve no idea what that diet would look like either… I actually really enjoy eating this stuff though- it gives me the energy I need and it actually tastes pretty damn good. I love my oats, fruit and fish!

Never really been a huge fan of red meat, usually I prefer fish/ turkey or chicken, but I guess I’ll chuck in a steak once in a while. I wouldn’t really want to take in any more protein either, as I’m already taking in 2x per pound. You say you’re not crazy about the fat breakdown- you thinking I should up it??

[quote]watermelon_2001 wrote:
Lol, I’ve never had to cut before, so I’ve no idea what that diet would look like either… I actually really enjoy eating this stuff though- it gives me the energy I need and it actually tastes pretty damn good. I love my oats, fruit and fish![/quote]

Hey, nothing wrong with that! It’s a good mindset to enjoy healthy food.

Variety is good. Also read this if you haven’t see it before.

This is mostly about timing. There have been countless studies about the benefit of ingesting a fast-digesting protein before, during, or immediately after working out.

Some articles.

I think including things like red meat, olive oil, fish oil, and switching a few of the fat-free yogurts to regular would a be a good choice.

[quote]Brant_Drake wrote:
watermelon_2001 wrote:
Lol, I’ve never had to cut before, so I’ve no idea what that diet would look like either… I actually really enjoy eating this stuff though- it gives me the energy I need and it actually tastes pretty damn good. I love my oats, fruit and fish!

Hey, nothing wrong with that! It’s a good mindset to enjoy healthy food.

Never really been a huge fan of red meat, usually I prefer fish/ turkey or chicken, but I guess I’ll chuck in a steak once in a while.

Variety is good. Also read this if you haven’t see it before.

I wouldn’t really want to take in any more protein either, as I’m already taking in 2x per pound.

This is mostly about timing. There have been countless studies about the benefit of ingesting a fast-digesting protein before, during, or immediately after working out.

Some articles.

You say you’re not crazy about the fat breakdown- you thinking I should up it??

I think including things like red meat, olive oil, fish oil, and switching a few of the fat-free yogurts to regular would a be a good choice.
[/quote]

Thanks for those links man, I’ll have a read over the articles. In terms of the whey shake, I’ve always been a firm believer in the idea of getting everything from whole foods. I dunno what the obsession with that is, but I think it’s I figure that people in the past never relied on shakes to get huge or muscular, they got all their needs from food. Also, with timing, I’m usually starting to eat my meal like 20 minutes after I’m finished at the gym- whereas not ideal as it’s not IMMEDIATELY after a workout, I was thinking 20 minutes shouldn’t really hurt…but I could be wrong…

If you can actually be consistent and keep up a diet like this without getting bored and deviating from it, then go for it.

I know I personally wouldn’t eat this way every day for 6 months, 12 months, whathaveyou in order to build muscle.

You’ll definately see progress if you can keep that up.
Shakes will come in handy if something were to come up and get in the way of a meal or two. I’ll assume you’re already up to your neck in tupperware though.

[quote]mr popular wrote:
If you can actually be consistent and keep up a diet like this without getting bored and deviating from it, then go for it.

I know I personally wouldn’t eat this way every day for 6 months, 12 months, whathaveyou in order to build muscle.[/quote]

It is easier I guess because I do like the foods… Mind you, fuckin difficult sometimes with student life, considering by flatmates are always getting takeaways, drinking beers, and filling the place with junkfood. I’ve pretty amazing willpower though, so I don’t cheat, no matter what. Even if I’m going out for a meal, I’ll find out the nutritional info before going so I can make a good decision that will fit into my requirements for that meal. The only time I ever EVER have a cheat day(s) is Christmas Day and Boxing Day. Other than that, nope- not on my Birthday…

[quote]watermelon_2001 wrote:
In terms of the whey shake, I’ve always been a firm believer in the idea of getting everything from whole foods. I dunno what the obsession with that is, but I think it’s I figure that people in the past never relied on shakes to get huge or muscular, they got all their needs from food. [/quote]

People really didn’t get huge before the mid-part of this century. Getting big required having an economy that made the correct foods available and plentiful, gyms available to people, and the anatomical and physiological knowledge to manipulate the body. This “people got big off of whole foods and manual labor without even trying” is kind of a crock.

And shakes are real food! Milk - cheese = whey. So if you think shakes aren’t real food, then neither is anything that is a component of anything else. Egg whites, fat-free yogurt . . .see what I’m getting at?

Just a random thought - where I live, the full-fat and the fat-free greek yogurt cost exactly the same, but the full-fat has twice the calories.

[quote]Brant_Drake wrote:
watermelon_2001 wrote:
In terms of the whey shake, I’ve always been a firm believer in the idea of getting everything from whole foods. I dunno what the obsession with that is, but I think it’s I figure that people in the past never relied on shakes to get huge or muscular, they got all their needs from food.

People really didn’t get huge before the mid-part of this century. Getting big required having an economy that made the correct foods available and plentiful, gyms available to people, and the anatomical and physiological knowledge to manipulate the body. This “people got big off of whole foods and manual labor without even trying” is kind of a crock.

And shakes are real food! Milk - cheese = whey. So if you think shakes aren’t real food, then neither is anything that is a component of anything else. Egg whites, fat-free yogurt . . .see what I’m getting at?[/quote]

Not entirely true. I see what you’re saying, and kinda agree with it, but it’s certainly possible to get big from whole foods. People back then didn’t eat enough, as you say, but the bodybuilders from the 50-60s and even 70s stuck to mostly whole food diets as well–some pretty awesome physiques can be generated without protein shakes.

That being said, use shakes when necessary OP. They can be considered real food, but they should be your back up plan. Don’t live on them in other words. They’re a good tool, you just shouldn’t get stuck on them (doesn’t look like you’re in any danger of that). Good on you for using whole foods,

but USE A SHAKE AROUND YOUR WORKOUT TIME!!!

liquid calories absorb faster than solid calories, and the name of the game during and immediately post workout is getting protein and carbs into your muscles ASAP! Mix a scoop of whey protein in with your gatorade. Protein + Carbs will always be superior to Carbs alone in a liquid form at workout time.

[quote]SolidGround wrote:
That certainly is a mass gaining diet. I believe a typical person’s maintenance caloric intake will be around 15 times their body weight in pounds. So yours I would guess would a little under 1900 Kcal, which you are currently eating over double that. I am not going to tell you to cut back as you have chosen pretty healthy foods there, but watch the weight you are gaining.

If you feel gaining a lot of fat consider cutting back on the calories a bit. You could also consider cycling caloric intake, more on training days less on off days. But you seem to have written up a good diet to start with. Good luck[/quote]

I don’t believe 1900 calories is true maintenance. I think you’re thinking of ‘basal metabolic rate’ which is only what the muscle/nervous tissue burns without ANY daily activity whatsoever. You’ll need more than that if you’re not comatose or lying in bed all day.

That being said, the OP’s pretty damn lightweight, so maybe you’re right after all.

But 2 lbs a week ain’t too much weight gain anyway, especially considering how really really small you are, it’s a good starting rate. If you go above that I’d cut back, but you’re fine so far I think.

[quote]mr popular wrote:
How the hell do you enjoy life eating this way when BULKING? I can’t imagine what your cutting diet must look like…

Also, on a sidenote, in my opinion calorie cycling is a bad idea… especially the concept of eating severely less calories on non-training days - hint: those are the days your muscles are actually recovering and using a surplus of nutrients to rebuild and grow larger. Why deprive them?[/quote]

I think the idea behind calorie cycling is that you STILL eat above maintenance on rest days, just not AS much. I think if done correctly it can certainly help keep fat gain to a minimum. As long as you’re still over maintenance, you should be ok.

[quote]Aragorn wrote:

I don’t believe 1900 calories is true maintenance. I think you’re thinking of ‘basal metabolic rate’ which is only what the muscle/nervous tissue burns without ANY daily activity whatsoever. You’ll need more than that if you’re not comatose or lying in bed all day.

That being said, the OP’s pretty damn lightweight, so maybe you’re right after all.

But 2 lbs a week ain’t too much weight gain anyway, especially considering how really really small you are, it’s a good starting rate. If you go above that I’d cut back, but you’re fine so far I think. [/quote]

Basal metabolic rate is going to be much lower than the 1900 Kcal. Both are highly individualistic and I only put the number in my first post to give perspective on how many calories he is intaking. It is just an estimate based on what a typical person’s maintenance calories will be.

Ok. I think, however, that given the insane amount of walking up and down hills he does every day (look at his other thread), he’ll be just fine with these calories.