T Nation

Of Movements and Muscles

A lot of beginners make the mistake of going to the gym, doing bench presses and expecting their sprinting time to improve. If you want your performance to increase, you have to remember two things when training.

  1. Practice the movement. You won’t get better at jumping if all you do is jog for an hour. Doing 50 pullups non-stop in a set won’t help either. You have to jump. Train the jump.

  2. Develop the muscle. Sometimes, beginners think quads when they hear sprint. When they want to improve their sprint, they supplement running with leg extensions. They don’t realize that the true sprinting powerhouse comes from the posterior chain, as in hamstrings and glutes among other things.

You shouldn’t make the same mistake. Know which muscles are the most involved. Revolve your supplement exercises around that.

That’s my 2 cents. I hope I helped some beginners out there.

That’s pretty good advice, man. : )

i read this then i was like

ok

Although I think this advice is helpful, I also think that it may cause beginners go into information overload or paralysis by analysis. I mean they can spend hours on end analyzing which muscle is THE powerhouse of a particular movement, etc.

I hope beginners will also remember than even though it is important to train muscles, it is sometimes better to just keep it simple and train the movement. If you’re a beginner, chances are you’ll improve anyway as long as you practice the movement.

howbout beginners just use a balanced approach to strength training and build up their weakpoints (IE everything). Then they dont really have to think, because the more you think the more likely you are to fuck up.

Good post for the beginners.

[quote]undeadlift wrote:
Although I think this advice is helpful, I also think that it may cause beginners go into information overload or paralysis by analysis. I mean they can spend hours on end analyzing which muscle is THE powerhouse of a particular movement, etc.

I hope beginners will also remember than even though it is important to train muscles, it is sometimes better to just keep it simple and train the movement. If you’re a beginner, chances are you’ll improve anyway as long as you practice the movement.[/quote]

Good point. Rule 1 is always more important than rule 2 for beginners. GHRs and reverse hypers won’t increase your jump as much as real jumping would.