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Odd Lifts for Self-Confidence.

Most of the time I do not use a barbell. I use pallets,weight filled travel bags,beds,logs etc. and with a little imagination,there is no problem so doing.
Using odd objects confuses the leverages involved and a lot of the time you’re in the dark either about the exact weight being used or how a particular lift translates to a barbell lift of the same weight. I think this is very good for a beginner because they don’t have to mourn over lifting only X pounds in a specific lift,as the lifts being done are obscure and there is little comparison. This ensures gradual strength development without the mental stress associated with the barbell,or dumbbell for that matter.

Another thing I like to do is stand on one leg while doing a lift. I believe this really forced my hamstrings and hip adbductors to develop regardless of what I was doing (of course this requires doing more lifts),as long as it was a compound move. You can only lift so much that way (I often clean with one arm and on one leg for example) but there is very little stress associated with because you’re not supposed to be able to lift much this way. Once you hit a weight that is even close to large in this manner,it feels great. I remember reading studies were done about one legged jumps relative to normal,and that the single leg exercises engaged the muscle more.

[quote]Alffi wrote:
Most of the time I do not use a barbell. I use pallets,weight filled travel bags,beds,logs etc. and with a little imagination,there is no problem so doing.
Using odd objects confuses the leverages involved and a lot of the time you’re in the dark either about the exact weight being used or how a particular lift translates to a barbell lift of the same weight. I think this is very good for a beginner because they don’t have to mourn over lifting only X pounds in a specific lift,as the lifts being done are obscure and there is little comparison. This ensures gradual strength development without the mental stress associated with the barbell,or dumbbell for that matter.

Another thing I like to do is stand on one leg while doing a lift. I believe this really forced my hamstrings and hip adbductors to develop regardless of what I was doing (of course this requires doing more lifts),as long as it was a compound move. You can only lift so much that way (I often clean with one arm and on one leg for example) but there is very little stress associated with because you’re not supposed to be able to lift much this way. Once you hit a weight that is even close to large in this manner,it feels great. I remember reading studies were done about one legged jumps relative to normal,and that the single leg exercises engaged the muscle more.[/quote]

Sounds like a great way to justify being weak tbh…

How do you know you’re getting stronger unless you’re lifting more weight? The odd objects that you’re lifting might not be any heavier…

[quote]Alffi wrote:
(I often clean with one arm and on one leg for example)[/quote]

Doesn’t sound like you can use a lot of weight. Doesn’t sound safe either.

Prolly not the smartest way to train. Sounds like your running away from reality. You NEED to see how much your lifting, your not being critical enough.

[quote]Hanley wrote:

Sounds like a great way to justify being weak tbh…

How do you know you’re getting stronger unless you’re lifting more weight? The odd objects that you’re lifting might not be any heavier…[/quote]

I can attach extra weight to the weight I’m using. Changing leverages comes in too. A weight that was heavy enough to jerk at one point becomes pressable.

I’m not justifying being weak. It’s all about doing away with the feeling of being weak,even if untrue,which I’m sure plagues numerous lifters.

[quote]Iron-Head10 wrote:
Prolly not the smartest way to train. Sounds like your running away from reality. You NEED to see how much your lifting, your not being critical enough. [/quote]
What’s the difference,as long as what I’m lifting feels heavy?

[quote]Alffi wrote:
Iron-Head10 wrote:
Prolly not the smartest way to train. Sounds like your running away from reality. You NEED to see how much your lifting, your not being critical enough.
What’s the difference,as long as what I’m lifting feels heavy?[/quote]

Are you serious???

I can get under a 120kg squat and it can feel heavy on some days. Other days I might get under 180 and it’ll feel light. Just because it “feels” heavy, doesn’t mean it’s heavy for you.

To the OP, if it works for you, great.

your trying way to hard to be clever.

being clever never made anyone stronger. Basic, simple, hard lifting makes people stronger.

put twice your body weight on a bar and try to squat it, you will be crushed.

How do you use correct form on an odd lift?

[quote]I remember I could not move 200lbs a few years ago (1-3),being a little fatigued. My bodyweight was probably 160-185 at 5’10-11.
A 400 clean is not beyond me anymore.

This might help as inspiration.[/quote]

i just saw this other post you made yesterday. do you mean that we are to believe that you weight 185, are 5’ 11, train primarily using odd objects (often on one leg) AND can clean 400 lbs?

is your name Hancock by any chance?

The odd lifts are a good adjunct to weight training with bars and dumbbells for the exact reason that they make the stabilizing muscles work more.

I don’t think it’s either/or though. Both is a good way to go. One can focus on one or the other as the main training regimen, but I think it makes sense to include the other.

However, people dunno whether you’re strong if you tell them you can lift a sandbag. There’s no frame of reference. When you tell them you can bench 315 for reps - THAT they understand. sorta. So you kinda lose bragging rights just doing odd lifts. unless it’s a fridge, that is.

[quote]skidmark wrote:
The odd lifts are a good adjunct to weight training with bars and dumbbells for the exact reason that they make the stabilizing muscles work more.
[/quote]

(skidmark, this isn’t really directed at you, its for the OP really. this just made a good quote to start with)

what are “stabilizing muscles”? did i miss those in biology class? are there lots of little muscles around the body that arn’t on the charts?

or perhaps do you mean that when working with odd lifts, different muscles not primary involved in the lift must also work to stabilize the body?

if the former is true, then much of the allure of odd lifts is gone. it would seem that in fact, odd lifts are quite inefficient. that is, since less weight is being used, the primary muscle groups are doing less work then they would otherwise, and the secondary muscle groups stabilizing the body are doing a relatively small amount of work. this begs the question, why not just do more efficient movements (ie, one’s with balanced barbells and dumbbells) that allow more work to be done by the primary muscle groups?

one might object, oh no no no–i want to be functional! i want to be able to handle weight in real life situations. the last time i checked through, lifting barbells IS a “real” life situation. there’s nothing fake about it… unless your trying to tell me that someone who can squat 600 lbs can’t “transfer” (whatever that would mean) that strength into other situations. but this seems like a far fetched claim.

lastly, you might finally argue in defense of odd lifts that they are better then barbell and dumbbell movements for developing overall conditioning. this i agree with. of course you’ll have a easier time coming up with a conditioning routine using sandbags and rocks instead of barbells and dumbbells… the latter were never designed to be used by someone moving.

i’ll still never get over the idea of someone trying to tell me that a big squatter doesn’t have “functional” strength.

[quote]stokedporcupine wrote:
I remember I could not move 200lbs a few years ago (1-3),being a little fatigued. My bodyweight was probably 160-185 at 5’10-11.
A 400 clean is not beyond me anymore.

This might help as inspiration.

i just saw this other post you made yesterday. do you mean that we are to believe that you weight 185, are 5’ 11, train primarily using odd objects (often on one leg) AND can clean 400 lbs?

is your name Hancock by any chance?[/quote]

Ohhhhhh shit. Nice catch.

I remember seeing that post about a 400lb clean in the 500lb deadlift thread and being skeptical alright.

[quote]Alffi wrote:
Iron-Head10 wrote:
Prolly not the smartest way to train. Sounds like your running away from reality. You NEED to see how much your lifting, your not being critical enough.
What’s the difference,as long as what I’m lifting feels heavy?[/quote]

Yes but you need to know HOW heavy it is, so next time you can make progress. And it doesnt really matter how it FEELS. If you dont know how much your lifting, how do you know your making progress? Unless you just lift it more times in a row, or for more sets and reps. But if you wanna get stronger and add muscle, you need to lift more weight. And it would really help if you knew how much you were putting up so next time you could put up more. Come on here bud, im not trying to be a dick. Im giving you advice in the hope that it will help you.

I’m not strong by any means, but I am improving. I train with a lot of rather strong guys but have no problem with being the smallest. You are not any stronger if you use sandbags instead of dumbbells and if someones ego doesn’t allow for comparison with others, maybe he should get his mind right… There is always someone whos stronger

[quote]Hanley wrote:
Alffi wrote:
Iron-Head10 wrote:
Prolly not the smartest way to train. Sounds like your running away from reality. You NEED to see how much your lifting, your not being critical enough.
What’s the difference,as long as what I’m lifting feels heavy?

Are you serious???

I can get under a 120kg squat and it can feel heavy on some days. Other days I might get under 180 and it’ll feel light. Just because it “feels” heavy, doesn’t mean it’s heavy for you.[/quote]

If you can do 180 and need to sweat with 120 at times,then I would guess you have a problem. I don’t think that’s normal at all. Perhaps you went at it insufficiently recovered. I can listen to my body. I can distinguish between moderate heavy and a maximum effort.

[quote]Iron-Head10 wrote:
Alffi wrote:
Iron-Head10 wrote:
Prolly not the smartest way to train. Sounds like your running away from reality. You NEED to see how much your lifting, your not being critical enough.
What’s the difference,as long as what I’m lifting feels heavy?

Yes but you need to know HOW heavy it is, so next time you can make progress. And it doesnt really matter how it FEELS. If you dont know how much your lifting, how do you know your making progress? Unless you just lift it more times in a row, or for more sets and reps. But if you wanna get stronger and add muscle, you need to lift more weight. And it would really help if you knew how much you were putting up so next time you could put up more. Come on here bud, im not trying to be a dick. Im giving you advice in the hope that it will help you.
[/quote]

I totally see where you’re coming from. It’s not as bad as it may sound. I can actually weigh a weight after a while,once it starts feeling light enough. Do more reps etc. I always stick to roughly similar movement patterns. I don’t want to go into details now so I won’t provide an opening for the naysayers but it’s not as bad as it sounds you see. I’m going to start normal squatting soon as I get a rack.

[quote]Hanley wrote:
stokedporcupine wrote:
I remember I could not move 200lbs a few years ago (1-3),being a little fatigued. My bodyweight was probably 160-185 at 5’10-11.
A 400 clean is not beyond me anymore.

This might help as inspiration.

i just saw this other post you made yesterday. do you mean that we are to believe that you weight 185, are 5’ 11, train primarily using odd objects (often on one leg) AND can clean 400 lbs?

is your name Hancock by any chance?

Ohhhhhh shit. Nice catch.

I remember seeing that post about a 400lb clean in the 500lb deadlift thread and being skeptical alright.[/quote]

I was that weight. I’m around 220 (see profile). Still skeptical? I can try to get video footage.

[quote]JayPierce wrote:
How do you use correct form on an odd lift?[/quote]

Correct form by what standards? As long as the joint angles one goes through are similar,what is the difference? I suppose you could have assumed that it is not even possible,but that is not the case.