T Nation

Occlusion Training


#1

I keep reading and hearing about occlusion training. I’ve got a buddy who swears by it for arm and leg training. Anyone do this? Is it more of a feel thing, or do you feel like you get anything extra out of it?


#2

I did it (for arms) for quite a while. Can’t say I got anything but a good pump out of it.

One upside is it reduces the weight needed to get good work in. This is an advantage when one is dealing with hinky tendons.


#3

I tried it for legs. Didn’t get anything extra out of it in terms of growth. And I was on lots of roids, So I dunno, maybe a natural will get that extra pump(it’s quite intense) for increased mmc if you do it as the first exercise.


#4

it fucking burns, so you’d hope it was doing something.

Like the other guys, I can’t say I really got much out of it other than a pump that seemed to last a couple of days.

I do like it, though. I’ll probably do it again at some point.

Pro tip - buy yourself some quick-release medical tourniquets


#5

Thanks all. I might give it a try. How tight did you all make it? Should it only be done for isolation movements, or would light high rep squats/ohp be fine? Cheers


#6

eight out of ten

haha, try it on squats and let us know how it went…


#7

Just bought some tourniquets off amazon… accidentally used the company amazon account… boss gets an email confirming order… and asks if I am going to start a heroin addiction. lol


#8

It helped me a lot when I was battling really bad elbow issues. Arthritis and golfers elbow aren’t a great combo when you want big arms. So it helped me train through that and honestly (imo) it helped with the healing process of the tendonitis. Results weren’t crazy except for the pumps and that when I went back to training arms heavy again, it was completely foreign.


#9

This right here makes it worth it. I have horrible golfers’ elbow from years of throwing a baseball.


#10

Yeah I would give it a shot then. Good luck mayne


#11

The term occlusion training is actually a bit misleading. The bands should be tight enough to cause venous occlusion (ie, prevent blood leaving the limb), but not so tight as to cause arterial occlusion (ie, prevent blood from entering the limb).

Rule of thumb: If you can’t feel a pulse distal to the occlusion site after applying the band, it’s too tight.