T Nation

NSCA CPT Book Sucks

The NSCA cpt book seems to think mitochondrial density decreases from resistance training. I thought that that was all reps in the 10-15 range did was increase stuff like mitochondria and sarcoplasm.

don’t fret, it’s just a ticket to get your foot in the door. Most of that stuff you will most likely forget, not need, or learn something later that is much more practical when dealing with the average person.

[quote]jehovasfitness wrote:
don’t fret, it’s just a ticket to get your foot in the door. Most of that stuff you will most likely forget, not need, or learn something later that is much more practical when dealing with the average person.[/quote]

X2

Just get the cert and do your thing.

[quote]darkhorse1-1 wrote:
The NSCA cpt book seems to think mitochondrial density decreases from resistance training. I thought that that was all reps in the 10-15 range did was increase stuff like mitochondria and sarcoplasm.[/quote]

This is actually your error. Density = n/V, where n is a unit of some sort, in this case probably an enzyme associated with mitochondria and V is volume, in this case probably a cross section of a cell.

You forgot to account for increases in volume… weight training makes the muscles bigger, which is going to result in increasing volume. Mitochondria are part of the aerobic pathway and aren’t going to be stimulated to proliferate to a high degree from weight training (anaerobic). If V goes up a lot and n only goes up a little, this will be a decrease in mitochondrial density.

Regardless, as other posters mentioned knowing this kind of stuff doesn’t really mean much in the real world. It does mean you need to study more though before you take your test, lol.

I just make flash cards and try to memorize this stuff without question. I stopped for a second to question. they don’t explain everything. they just throw a lot of things at you with out much background on them. which is fine cause I’m not trying to be a physical therapist. good talk. thanks guys.

If you’ve been reading T-Nation for a while, back in the day when Mike Robertson and Eric Cressey were publishing the NNM series and CT was publishing his “… for newbies” series, you wouldn’t need to study for it at all. I know I didn’t.
My suggestion is go read some of the archived article on posture and corrective exercise as well as CT’s compendiums on nutrition and training.

Obviously CT’s position has evolved over the years, but at it’s core it’s truly a gem.

[quote]TooHuman wrote:
If you’ve been reading T-Nation for a while, back in the day when Mike Robertson and Eric Cressey were publishing the NNM series and CT was publishing his “… for newbies” series, you wouldn’t need to study for it at all. I know I didn’t.
My suggestion is go read some of the archived article on posture and corrective exercise as well as CT’s compendiums on nutrition and training.

Obviously CT’s position has evolved over the years, but at it’s core it’s truly a gem.
[/quote]

I looked through some of TC’s articles. I’m sure it’s possible I could have missed them but I couldn’t find anything specifically called “for newbies”. I did a search or two for them also. What’s the acronym NNM stand for? I did a search for that and the only thing that came back was one of Cressey’s 22 random thoughts articles. The part that involved NNM was a program jumper guy or acronym guy.

[quote]darkhorse1-1 wrote:

[quote]TooHuman wrote:
If you’ve been reading T-Nation for a while, back in the day when Mike Robertson and Eric Cressey were publishing the NNM series and CT was publishing his “… for newbies” series, you wouldn’t need to study for it at all. I know I didn’t.
My suggestion is go read some of the archived article on posture and corrective exercise as well as CT’s compendiums on nutrition and training.

Obviously CT’s position has evolved over the years, but at it’s core it’s truly a gem.
[/quote]

I looked through some of TC’s articles. I’m sure it’s possible I could have missed them but I couldn’t find anything specifically called “for newbies”. I did a search or two for them also. What’s the acronym NNM stand for? I did a search for that and the only thing that came back was one of Cressey’s 22 random thoughts articles. The part that involved NNM was a program jumper guy or acronym guy.[/quote]

Nutrition for Newbies and Training for Newbies
NNM is Neanderthal No More

[quote]TooHuman wrote:

[quote]darkhorse1-1 wrote:

[quote]TooHuman wrote:
If you’ve been reading T-Nation for a while, back in the day when Mike Robertson and Eric Cressey were publishing the NNM series and CT was publishing his “… for newbies” series, you wouldn’t need to study for it at all. I know I didn’t.
My suggestion is go read some of the archived article on posture and corrective exercise as well as CT’s compendiums on nutrition and training.

Obviously CT’s position has evolved over the years, but at it’s core it’s truly a gem.
[/quote]

I looked through some of TC’s articles. I’m sure it’s possible I could have missed them but I couldn’t find anything specifically called “for newbies”. I did a search or two for them also. What’s the acronym NNM stand for? I did a search for that and the only thing that came back was one of Cressey’s 22 random thoughts articles. The part that involved NNM was a program jumper guy or acronym guy.[/quote]

Nutrition for Newbies and Training for Newbies
NNM is Neanderthal No More[/quote]

And CT (Christian Thibaudeau), not TC.

And yeah, even in the 10-15 rep range, I would expect weight training to be mostly anaerobic. A decrease in mitochondrial density in someone already well adapted for aerobic training wouldn’t surprise me.