T Nation

Nothing New Under the Sun pt.II

Here is another very old article of mine. This shows the basis of my current line of thinking in its infancy.

http://web.archive.org/web/20010219221918/http://www.ironmag.com/ct_canadian_naprt.html

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:
Here is another very old article of mine. This shows the basis of my current line of thinking in its infancy.

http://web.archive.org/web/20010219221918/http://www.ironmag.com/ct_canadian_naprt.html[/quote]

If I do that training only to get stronger and do not plan to do a powerlifting competition, would it still be better to drop the volume at the third and fourth week of the peaking period to allow your body to surcompensate ?

Thanks !

[quote]awaken279 wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:
Here is another very old article of mine. This shows the basis of my current line of thinking in its infancy.

http://web.archive.org/web/20010219221918/http://www.ironmag.com/ct_canadian_naprt.html[/quote]

If I do that training only to get stronger and do not plan to do a powerlifting competition, would it still be better to drop the volume at the third and fourth week of the peaking period to allow your body to surcompensate ?

Thanks ![/quote]

I wouldn’t do the program exactly as I wrote it in 2000. I’m currently rewrite it so that it is more up-to-date.

One thing I would modify is use more gradual ramping fro set to set on the heavy day…

More like 50% of 3RM x 3
75% of 3RM x 3
75% +10lbs x 3
+10 x 3
+5 x 3
+5 until I reach the max force point for 3 reps.

If someone is more after strength but not competing I would drop the last 2 weeks of the cycle and deload (an article on that subject will come up soon).

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]awaken279 wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:
Here is another very old article of mine. This shows the basis of my current line of thinking in its infancy.

http://web.archive.org/web/20010219221918/http://www.ironmag.com/ct_canadian_naprt.html[/quote]

If I do that training only to get stronger and do not plan to do a powerlifting competition, would it still be better to drop the volume at the third and fourth week of the peaking period to allow your body to surcompensate ?

Thanks ![/quote]

I wouldn’t do the program exactly as I wrote it in 2000. I’m currently rewrite it so that it is more up-to-date.

One thing I would modify is use more gradual ramping fro set to set on the heavy day…

More like 50% of 3RM x 3
75% of 3RM x 3
75% +10lbs x 3
+10 x 3
+5 x 3
+5 until I reach the max force point for 3 reps.

If someone is more after strength but not competing I would drop the last 2 weeks of the cycle and deload (an article on that subject will come up soon).[/quote]

So, there would obviously have more sets, right ? Well Thank you for rewriting it, I am very interested in trying this program soon. It is very appreciated !

I remember that article as well from way back. Wasn’t that your version of the old Korte 3x3 routine?

As long as we’re digging up old articles, here was a really good one:

I think I did this workout 2 or 3 times and that was enough to put 10 lbs. on my deadlift. It was indeed a lot of hard work, but since it used autoregulation, it wasn’t feel-like-you-got-hit-by-a-truck hard.

Really would like to see what your current idea of a good strength program is, incorporating your latest ideas. I followed part I of beast building and I gained so much strength it was a joke. Then I followed a push/pull/legs routine you outlined and gained more strength super fast.

I’m talking more gains in 6 months than I had in the previous 6 years (of half-assed and stupid programs). It was pretty fucking ridiculous, and needless to say from then on I’ve been reading everything you write. So yeah, definitely looking forward to reading more about what you have to say concerning strength gains.

[quote]wramsey wrote:
… Then I followed a push/pull/legs routine you outlined and gained more strength super fast. [/quote]

I keep reading about this routine in a few posts of this forum, but I haven’t found it yet; the only info (in Q&A #3) is:

  • a main lift, micro-ramping to the max force point (like 8-12 sets of 3 reps);

  • two-three assistance exercises working the muscles involved in the main movement, one set of as many reps as possible (starting in the 8-12 range as a rough guideline);

is there anything else I am missing? Thank to anybody who will take the time to answer…

He never outlined it step by step or anything. Just gave general guidelines which you can use to create your own program (obviously I threw in the calf raises). What I’m doing now is:

push: bench press 8-12x3, push press 2xM, DB incline press 2xM, dips 2xM
pull: pullups 8-12x3, barbell rows 2xM, barbell shrugs 2xM, barbell curls 2xM
legs: squat 8-12x3, front squat 2xM, leg press 2xM, calf raises 2xM

3 on 1 off then next cycle I switch bench and push press (so I’m ramping push press and doing 2 sets of bench) and I also swap squat out for deadlift and do a hips-dominant workout. CT posted somewhere recently, just read through his posts from the past week or two and you’ll find it.

the general setup is:
1 main: 8-12x2-5 ramping starting @60% max
3-5 asst: 4-6x4-6 OR 1-2xM -20% of weight of last ramp set

I really like the max sets at the end for some reason. It’s like the best of both worlds you ramp up with low reps and heavy weight but still get some good higher rep sets which:

  1. gives you the burn and thus more GH production
  2. keeps you conditioned so you can actually do higher rep sets without failing on rep 6 using what should be your 12RM
  3. adds some good volume without fatiguing your nervous system too much plus keeps you strong on the assistance exercises which allows a different kind of stimulus for muscle growth than if you only did the basic compounds

this is my reasoning not CT’s btw. maybe he will correct anything he disagrees with or explain his reasoning.

[quote]wramsey wrote:
He never outlined it step by step or anything. Just gave general guidelines which you can use to create your own program (obviously I threw in the calf raises). What I’m doing now is:

push: bench press 8-12x3, push press 2xM, DB incline press 2xM, dips 2xM
pull: pullups 8-12x3, barbell rows 2xM, barbell shrugs 2xM, barbell curls 2xM
legs: squat 8-12x3, front squat 2xM, leg press 2xM, calf raises 2xM

3 on 1 off then next cycle I switch bench and push press (so I’m ramping push press and doing 2 sets of bench) and I also swap squat out for deadlift and do a hips-dominant workout. CT posted somewhere recently, just read through his posts from the past week or two and you’ll find it.

the general setup is:
1 main: 8-12x2-5 ramping starting @60% max
3-5 asst: 4-6x4-6 OR 1-2xM -20% of weight of last ramp set

I really like the max sets at the end for some reason. It’s like the best of both worlds you ramp up with low reps and heavy weight but still get some good higher rep sets which:

  1. gives you the burn and thus more GH production
  2. keeps you conditioned so you can actually do higher rep sets without failing on rep 6 using what should be your 12RM
  3. adds some good volume without fatiguing your nervous system too much plus keeps you strong on the assistance exercises which allows a different kind of stimulus for muscle growth than if you only did the basic compounds

this is my reasoning not CT’s btw. maybe he will correct anything he disagrees with or explain his reasoning.[/quote]

Thank you, man! Yes, this set-up makes a lot of sense…gonna put in my toolbox, for sure!

EDIT: /hijack…sorry :slight_smile:

Great article! You should make a sticky in your forum with all your articles, both old and new. I enjoy reading them - your work/thoughts has helped me alot in my training moreso than any other coach.

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

I wouldn’t do the program exactly as I wrote it in 2000. I’m currently rewrite it so that it is more up-to-date.

One thing I would modify is use more gradual ramping fro set to set on the heavy day…

More like 50% of 3RM x 3
75% of 3RM x 3
75% +10lbs x 3
+10 x 3
+5 x 3
+5 until I reach the max force point for 3 reps.

If someone is more after strength but not competing I would drop the last 2 weeks of the cycle and deload (an article on that subject will come up soon).[/quote]

Christian,

Since you’re preparing articles about concentric reps …

Do you think this kind of heavy-medium-light structure can be modified to use concentric reps, instead of simply varying the load?