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Not Counting Deadlift Reps When Resetting Grip? (Is This Just My Ego Talking?)

#1

I’m getting heavier on my deadlift reps using a double overhand grip. I’m cautious about switching to a mixed grip too early, because I don’t want to lose out on grip strength development as well.

Typically when I do my deadlift sets (3 sets of 6, rest pause), I do them touch and go, but as I’ve gotten heavier, I find my grip slipping on the 4th or 5th rep of each set. I can get through the first set hanging on for dear life, but I keep losing the bar on the second set.

Maybe it’s just my ego talking, but I don’t know if I should count the reps I do that aren’t touch and go (IE I reset my grip). The weight moves well once I reset my grip, and I can cleanly pull it, but I’m getting frustrated that I can’t finish the first 2x6 with all reps touch and go. Is that just stupid headgames, or is there a legitimate concern about having to reset?

My rest pause set (3rd) I typically switch to a mixed grip, and I have no issues completing a total of 12 reps.

I’m working my weights back up after a 6 month layoff, and I’m currently pulling 315 in my sets. It’s especially frustrating because I was pulling 315 for 12 with no grip issues before my lay off.

Thanks everyone.

#2

Um yeah you can count them it’s not like pausing for 3 secs to switch your grip is going to kill your gains…

Why don’t you just use your mixed grip and use other stuff to work your grip?

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#3

Touch and go reps are easier, so yes definitely count the reps where you reset.

You won’t miss out on grip strength development by switching to mixed. You’ll miss out on overall strength development by limiting your weights with a double overhand.

I use a double overhand in my warmup sets up to 365, then switch at 405 and beyond.

If you’re only using the deadlift as a grip builder then continue as you are, but there are better options if that is your goal.

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#4

^^^^^^
What he said. When picking your exercises you just need to figure out what your goal is. For deadlift, don’t let grip limit your training. If you’re only deadlifting to improve grip, then continue the way you are.

I’m banged up and haven’t done many deadlifts lately, but last year during my healthy stretch I pulled over 500 lbs pretty smoothly with straps. My grip fails around three plates. I sure wasn’t going to let that stop me from pulling five bills though.

Which do you think is better for overall strength development?

  1. Double overhand 315 x 6
  2. Straps 405 x 6

Everything in the gym comes down to the training goal for that exercise. Once you identify that then you can make progress without getting distracted by unimportant details.

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#5

My goal is definitely overall strength. And to that, I continue to improve through progressive overload. I originally started getting stuck at 285 due to grip. I started switching to mixed on the rest pause set, and just resetting when needed during my first two sets. I pulled 315 this week, and I’m increasing to 320 next week. Grip keeps failing in the same spots, so obviously I’m getting stronger. I bet if I pulled 285 today, I would be able to hold on for all 3 sets. Gains are gains, right?

I think I’m going to add carries on my “rest” day, and hope that helps my grip catch up so I can stay overhand as long as possible. I read a lot about it being the safest grip, and I’d like to stick with it as long as it’s feasible. However, as soon as I can’t budge the bar due to grip, I’m switching to mixed.

I appreciate you guys alleviating my ego’s concerns about the grip reset. Sounds like I need to stop overthinking it, and just pick the weight up.

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#6

Have you tried hook grip?

#7

How you proceed is entirely up to you. Personally, I do what I can double overhand but the moment my grip becomes the limiting factor (or the lift puts all of my focus on my grip) then I put on the straps.

It’s unlikely that you’ll get hurt doing mixed grip. The biceps injuries we hear about are rare cases. I used to do mixed grip and I’d just switch each set to make sure both sides got equal work.

Yes. Some sets I get it locked in and others darn near remove my thumb. It’s a work in progress, but I prefer to just focus on deadlifting when the weight exceeds my grip strength. I use straps and just pull. I don’t deadlift for grip strength and grip is the last thing I want to think about during the movement.

#8

I feel you, I used straps for quite some time. But now that i feel fine with the hook grip I never have to worry about my grip anymore

#9

Not really. You’re training your grip, but you’re not training your deadlift strength optimally. You are training your deadlift at a much lower intensity than you are capable of.

#10

I’m glad to read all this because I’ve been having the same issue and thinking about training dead lifts with pause-rests just to let my hands rest a bit between reps.

#11

I’ve found that I seem stronger with out straps. I tried 180kg with straps and failed, then 6 days later got it with mixed grip and no straps. I think I feel better connected to the bar when I’m having to really grip it rather than relying on straps.

#12

Straps make the bar a little thicker and softer (obviously), and I think you can lose a bit of your grip/ irradiation at close to max weights.

For reps, though, straps all day. Actually, just for wussy people like me, straps all day!