T Nation

Non-Fat?

Lately I’ve been getting many non-fat products. Should some foods/liquids have a little fat?

What about milk and cottage cheese?

[quote]massarmor wrote:
Lately I’ve been getting many non-fat products. Should some foods/liquids have a little fat?

What about milk and cottage cheese?[/quote]

Questions like this are strange…yet intriguing. They give off a hint of “I just got done reading some info for the first time” with a touch of “I don’t know what the hell I’m even asking”. All together, these types of questions can often turn into multi-page threads filled with hilarity. Let’s watch.

Hi

Massive Eating 1 - Calorie Needs
http://www.T-Nation.com/readTopic.do?id=460331

Massive Eating 2 - Meal Combinations and Individual Differences
http://www.T-Nation.com/readTopic.do?id=460327

this covers the basics very well :slight_smile:

gl/hf

[quote]massarmor wrote:
Lately I’ve been getting many non-fat products. Should some foods/liquids have a little fat?

What about milk and cottage cheese?[/quote]

Check to make sure they didn’t add a ton of sugar to give the food some kind of taste. Also make sure to add fat to your meals (olive/fish oil, nuts, flax seed, etc.)

[quote]Doug Adams wrote:
massarmor wrote:
Lately I’ve been getting many non-fat products. Should some foods/liquids have a little fat?

What about milk and cottage cheese?

Check to make sure they didn’t add a ton of sugar to give the food some kind of taste. Also make sure to add fat to your meals (olive/fish oil, nuts, flax seed, etc.)
[/quote]

His diet should be based on where he is physically and where he is trying to get to. I would hardly recommend some 109lbs poster like “friedrice” start worrying about whether his cottage cheese has sugar in it. Blanket advice rarely applies without any specific stats mentioned.

Non fat food that are NATURALLY non fat, such as an apple are good. Non fat food PRODUCTS, that are truly not real food, and are manufactured to be non-fat, such as non-fat cookies are not good.

Apples = OK
Snackwells and low fat cholate, NOT ok.

Focus on real food, fruits, veggies and meat. Eat according to your goals ( losing weigt, building muscle etc. ) and try to avoid food products.

Well, to be sure, the popular concept that “fat” is “bad” is quite simply, wrong.

The body needs certain types of fats and going to great lengths to avoid all sources of fat can actually be a mistake.

If you were actually obese and not some emo trying to get shredded toenails, then there might be some merit in being picky about where you got fat in your diet, but like Prof X said, it really depends so much on where you are right now and what your goals are… assuming they are even healthy goals undertaken with appropriate knowledge.

lol Professor X. Thanks for putting things into perspective. I’ll try to make things more clear

I heard that cows carry trans fats so I’m wondering if fat from milk and cottage cheese are worth consuming.

designinme - so since fat is naturally in milk, then it’s ok to keep it in?

Is it better to stick with fish oil and nuts for fats instead of fat from milk an cottage cheese?

[quote]massarmor wrote:
lol Professor X. Thanks for putting things into perspective. I’ll try to make things more clear

I heard that cows carry trans fats so I’m wondering if fat from milk and cottage cheese are worth consuming.

designinme - so since fat is naturally in milk, then it’s ok to keep it in?

Is it better to stick with fish oil and nuts for fats instead of fat from milk an cottage cheese?[/quote]

It’s about time you made sense. Congrats!!

Trans fats made artificially through hydrogenation should be avoided. What I assume you are discussing is the name given to saturated fat and dietary cholesterol found in biological material that is sometimes also referred to as “trans fats” in some reading material. It is the hydrogenation and artificial structure that you should be avoiding, not so much that found in biological material naturally.

I am not sure why some sources discuss saturated fat and dietary cholesterol as being “trans fats”. That isn’t what is meant when usually being discussed as far as diet.

I found some more info from:
http://www.tfx.org.uk/page62.html

[quote]
Most importantly, however, the naturally occurring trans fats have not, as they occur in animal fats, been shown to share the harmful properties of the synthetic trans fat resulting from hydrogenation[/quote]

Apparently, while there is some small amount of “trans fats” found in the gut of cows that finds it way into milk, it is not to be considered the same as the artificial kind put into food. There is also some debate still on just how much is actually present naturally.

The CLA found in fullfat dairy products is actually quite good for you. Even though it’s officially a ‘trans fat’, it’s not only not bad for health as artifical trans fats are, but there’s also evidence that it’s anti-inflamatory and can aid body composition.

Fat in milk is ok, but I am one of those weirdos that actually will only drink RAW, unpasteurized milk. When milk is heated the fat molecules change. From strictly a dietary point of view, milk fat is fine. I choose to drink milk that isn’t processed.

Another good source of fat is high quality coconut oil. Great for cooking.

Why don’t you tell us what your dietary goals are, where you are at, what your training looks like, and maybe some others will be able to give you some better advice.

Quality fat is good for you, but eating large amounts of fat ( good fats or bad fats ) along with high carb foods can cause your body to store fat. So its important to know what your stats and goals are. Getting the right amount of calories for your needs along with “nutrient” timing is important. I wouldn’t be eating a steak after hammering 3 scoops of surge if my goal was to lose weight. But, surge isn’t bad, and niether is the fat. its all about the goals you have.

designinme - so since fat is naturally in milk, then it’s ok to keep it in?