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No Gall Bladder Diet

Here’s a tricky one.

Let’s say someone has no gall bladder anymore.

What kind of foods would you reconmend?

An example eating plan conducive to weight loss?

I was explaining to someone that a high fat,protein,fibre diet was the way to go but fat it seems really does not agree with.

How would they get all the EFA’s, etc. if fat is like poison to them?

Supposedly ‘solid’ fat in nuts give’s 'em the runs and anything in liquid form like olive oil gives them heartburn.

The gall bladder was removed because of gall stones and the gall bladder itself pretty much non-functioning. This was caused by obesity.

Thoughts as always are appreciated.

I had my gallbladder removed years ago due to a hereditary condition. The gallbladder basically gives you an extra burst of bile to help digest fats. If you don’t digest the fats, worst case is that you will pass them. No worries about them poisoning you. Also, you may get diarrhea from consuming too much fat.

I think my body has adapted to it pretty well, but I still take some extra psyllium fiber daily to keep everything more “bulky”. As far as nutrition, Precision Nutrition has worked great for me (as well as many people WITH gallbladders). Read Dr. Berardi’s articles on T-Nation, or check out precisionnutrition.com.

[quote]Spry wrote:
Here’s a tricky one.

Let’s say someone has no gall bladder anymore.

What kind of foods would you reconmend?

An example eating plan conducive to weight loss?

I was explaining to someone that a high fat,protein,fibre diet was the way to go but fat it seems really does not agree with.

How would they get all the EFA’s, etc. if fat is like poison to them?

Supposedly ‘solid’ fat in nuts give’s 'em the runs and anything in liquid form like olive oil gives them heartburn.

The gall bladder was removed because of gall stones and the gall bladder itself pretty much non-functioning. This was caused by obesity.

Thoughts as always are appreciated.[/quote]

Without wanting to sound too mean…I think if you were recommending someone without a gallbladder go on a high fat diet, you probably don’t have the knowledge base to evaluate anything anyone posts in this thread.

Edit: Best thing to do is for him to discuss with his doctor how he can take his fatty acids. A little experimentation on his behalf will probably solve this.

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[quote]bushidobadboy wrote:
Well since the bile duct is still there, so that some bile does trickle into the GIT, I would think that a ‘dripfeed’ of healthy fats might be ok, as long as any large portions of fat/fatty foods are avoided.

So maybe the odd, but regular Flameout cap would be acceptible to his/her digestive tract.

Bushy[/quote]

I take 3 flameouts several times a day, with no ill effects. However, its been about 8 years since my surgery, so I have probably had some adaptations. Also, I am pretty used to non-solid poop by now, so it doesn’t really bother me any more. I often wonder if I have been passing some of those EFAs instead of absorbing them, especially since I get “fish smell poop” occasionally, seemingly at random.

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I’ve also been without a gall bladder for about 8 years.

I do get the runs on occasion, but it’s mostly after fatty meals on an empty stomach. I take Flameout in the morning without issue.

I never get fishy smelling runs, as reported above.

I know of friends who don’t seem to have bounced back as well as I seem to have from the surgery, but those folks are all couch potatoes. So it seems to me everyone adapts differently. But I think if you’re training your system will adapt a little better.

Again - just what I’ve experienced. A doc would be a better resource, but I wanted to weigh in as one of the gall bladderless.

One other thought on the runs. While ingesting the fat may cause them because the liver dumps bile into the small intestine, it’s not like that would mean the fish oil is already in the intestine and getting swept out to no effect. Indeed, bile is supposed to help the body to digest fats and fat soluble vitamins.

Also, fats are poison while one still has the gall bladder. It leads to a lot of pain and discomfort. However, once the gall bladder is gone, it just means the liver isn’t storing bile in the gall bladder - it just gets released into the intestine immediately.

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[quote]AlteredState wrote:
The liver doesn’t dump bile in as that is the job of the gall bladder.

With bladder removed, bile is not stored, but trickles continuously into the GIT.

I believe the runs are caused by relatively large amounts of dietary fat, consumed in a single sitting, which is now indigestible, post gall bladder removal.

The fat/oil lines the intestines and facilitates over-fast transmission of food along the GIT, resulting in it being expelled before being fully digested or has had it’s water content re-uptaken in the lower GIT.[/quote]

Not to hijack the thread but I have similar problems with fat digestion because I acquired pancreatitis a few years ago. I can no longer do keto diets because I get the runs a lot which really pisses me off because I used to rely heavily on them to cut up.

Bushy you’ve always been very helpful and always seem to have the answers and lol, that’s why I’m directing this to you. Why is it if I eat the same amount of fat, or even more, as long as it’s combined with lots of carbs I don’t get the runs but if I eat fats by thmeselves or even protein alone like on a keto diet I get problems.

My other question is why does this sometimes happen instantaneous. For example, minutes after I finish the meal and not always an hour or two later? It’s like a cramping switch gets immediatley turned on after the fatty meal.

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[quote]bushidobadboy wrote:
I believe the carbs act as a buffer between the fat and the wall of the GIT. Also the carbs act to slow down the overal rate of digestion of the fats.

For example, if you consume 10g of fat alone, then that is 10g which must be digested and absorbed then and there. However if you mix the fat with some carbs, only a proportion of the fat content will be in contact with the walls of the GIT at any one time, so only a proportion of the total fat needs to be absorbed at a given moment.

Can you tell me more about the pancreatitis please. I suspect it may have a different reslt than gall bladder removal as it may result in a deficiancy of certain enzymes.

On a side note, have to tried consuming digestive enzymes before meals?

Bushy[/quote]

Thanks for your time Bushy. The pancreatitis is my own fault. It came from years of heavy alchol abuse. Basically binge drinking and partying with the guys every weekend for years. Stupid I know, but I used to monitor my liver enzymes and everything was fine. I never knew I could damage my pancreas.

Anyway once you get pancreatitis your digestive capabilities are diminished in relation to how much damage you incurred. It also seems that fat digestion gets hit the hardest, hence the similarity with a removed gall bladder. Insulin secretion can also be compromised. I had an endoscopy done and the doctor found some scar tissue. I’ve tried betaine hydrochloride and other types of enzymes but they don’t seem to help. Msybe not the right types or good quality. Thanks again for any advice.

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