T Nation

Nietzsche Quote Help?


#1

Something about the anxiety of troubles of modern man being due to divorce/separation from a natural or primal state.

Anyone?


#2

Here are quite a few quotes of his, not sure if that exact one is in there.


#3

OP - I’d bet that there are better philosophers to quote on that subject than Nietzsche. Look into ‘natural law’ theory, specifically ‘state of nature.’ Aristotle was big into this. Once you can find a philo who talks about what our natural state IS, then they’ll certainly have quotes about what happens to those who deviate from that state. PM me if you want, I got philosophy coming out of my ass.


#4

“aristotle is gay.”

-F. Neechuh


#5

[quote]hlss09 wrote:
OP - I’d bet that there are better philosophers to quote on that subject than Nietzsche. Look into ‘natural law’ theory, specifically ‘state of nature.’ Aristotle was big into this. Once you can find a philo who talks about what our natural state IS, then they’ll certainly have quotes about what happens to those who deviate from that state. PM me if you want, I got philosophy coming out of my ass. [/quote]

Agree

Thomas Hobbes’ Leviathan would be good on the topic of ‘state of nature’ also.

A quote by Rousseau: “The savage lives in himself, the man accustomed to the way of society is always outside of himself and knows how to live only in the opinion of others”
(Discourse on the Origin of Inequality, 81)

You might want to check out Keats/Byron/Shelley also


#6

[quote]hlss09 wrote:
PM me if you want, I got philosophy coming out of my ass. [/quote]

That’s pretty much the source of most philosophy anyway.


#7

[quote]dollarbill44 wrote:

[quote]hlss09 wrote:
PM me if you want, I got philosophy coming out of my ass. [/quote]

That’s pretty much the source of most philosophy anyway.
[/quote]

Nice


#8

…I remembered where I read it and had the book on my desk at school…

This original sin, for Friedrich Nietzsche, was ressentiment, bad conscience, which developed due to our apmutation from our original condition as warriors, hunters, and “beasts of prey”, in civilization. Civilization domesticated humanity, made us docile, “a household pet”, although our inner nature continues to rebel against this deformation.

“Man, full of emptiness and torn apart with homesickness for the desert has had to create from within himself an adventure, a torture-chamber, an unsafe and hazardous wilderness-this fool, this prisoner consumed with longing and despair, became the inventor of ‘bad conscience’”

Modern nihilim revaled “man’s sickness of man himself” but this “forcible breach from his animal past” suggested, and pressed toward, new conditions of existence, “as though something were being announced through him, were being prepared, as though man were not an end but just a path, an episode, a bridge, a great promise…”