Niacin Flush to Deliver Nutrients?

Heyo!

Just doing more brainstorming. I do a niacin flush every month of two. I think it helps me detox my cells in the hard to reach areas of the body. And since like 75% of the cells in our body are supplied blood directly through capillaries, there is a LOT of those hard to reach areas.

Well I did a niacin flush the other night with my wife, and I thought to myself, what if I take my multi vitamin like 20-30 minutes prior to my flush, then the nutrients will be saturated in my bloodstream when the flush occurs and not only will the cells detox themselves, but they can gobble up any vitamins or minerals they are lacking much more readily.

Well my wife and I were just talking about it and we both came to the conclusion that this time when we did the flush it felt different, we almost felt a little high from it. I mean aside from the itching/burning it was actually kind of enjoyable.

I know my multi has quite a few “feel good” items in it, lots of B vits, ginko, ginsing, and a whole host of others. But it seems like at least anectdotally the idea had sucess in allowing our bodies to have a much higher uptake of the nutrients in the multi vitamin.

We are going to do another flush on friday, i’ll report to see if we have the same feeling about it.

To flush we pop down two 500 MG tabs of niacin. We drink a lot of water before and during also as you are trying to flush your system of toxins.

V

I take 1,000 mg daily, it is great for raising HDL levels. I have never actually heard of a niacin flush for detoxing. It may or may not have an effect taken after your multi, but I doubt there is a downside regardless.

[quote]vcraig111 wrote:
I take 1,000 mg daily, it is great for raising HDL levels. I have never actually heard of a niacin flush for detoxing. It may or may not have an effect taken after your multi, but I doubt there is a downside regardless. [/quote]

Do you take nicotinic acid or niacinamide, the latter is designed to not give you a flush, it’s like a timed release or something. And while I think raising HDL levels is great, and my father actually takes niacinamide for that reason, I actually take it to get the flush.

V

I don’t know why you would do that on purpose. I find it really irritating. I was also under the impression that it really only had a significant impact on the dilation of blood vessels in the skin. I don’t know how I got that impression though.

[quote]DoubleDuce wrote:
I don’t know why you would do that on purpose. I find it really irritating. I was also under the impression that it really only had a significant impact on the dilation of blood vessels in the skin. I don’t know how I got that impression though.[/quote]

Well the same reason you would get under a barbell with the intention of doing 20 rep squats, yes it is going to hurt, but you percieve there is gain to be had so you deal with the hurt. I think all the info I have read states systemic capillary dialation, but you feel it in the skin because thats where a lot of those receptors are for that type of stimulus.

V

[quote]Vegita wrote:

[quote]DoubleDuce wrote:
I don’t know why you would do that on purpose. I find it really irritating. I was also under the impression that it really only had a significant impact on the dilation of blood vessels in the skin. I don’t know how I got that impression though.[/quote]

Well the same reason you would get under a barbell with the intention of doing 20 rep squats, yes it is going to hurt, but you percieve there is gain to be had so you deal with the hurt. I think all the info I have read states systemic capillary dialation, but you feel it in the skin because thats where a lot of those receptors are for that type of stimulus.

V[/quote]

Well, I guess I’ve been detoxing and didn’t even know it. I actually take prescription “niaspan” at 2000mg a day.

I question whether increased nutrient uptake occurs due to capillary dilation since the walls are relatively porous to compounds of that size. Cells are already very good at uptaking nutrients they are low in. If you are seeing benefits, I would examine what vitamin or mineral you may be deficient in and seek to improve your diet or daily supplementation.

Even with normal dose vitamin therapy, those who are deficient respond best, those who aren’t don’t feel much or anything. I am not disputing how you feel, just pointing out that the explanation may be simpler than you think.

[quote]Peter Orban wrote:
I question whether increased nutrient uptake occurs due to capillary dilation since the walls are relatively porous to compounds of that size. Cells are already very good at uptaking nutrients they are low in. If you are seeing benefits, I would examine what vitamin or mineral you may be deficient in and seek to improve your diet or daily supplementation.

Even with normal dose vitamin therapy, those who are deficient respond best, those who aren’t don’t feel much or anything. I am not disputing how you feel, just pointing out that the explanation may be simpler than you think.[/quote]

I only had the idea of this based on why the tingling occurs during a niacin flush. It’s supposedly a histamine response because the cells are toxic and are in a semi dormant state, however when the capillaries dialate and more blood comes at a faster rate, it “wakes them up” to the point where they can send out histamine as a normal healthy cell would when exposed to excessive amounts of toxins. I.E. like a bugbite. So at least in my mind, if the cells aren’t recieving an adequate amount of circulation for toxin removal, they may also not be recieving an adequate amount for nutrient uptake, at least optimally so.

I’m only hazarding a guess about the nutrient uptake, but based on the studies done regarding the histamine response, I would lean towards suboptimal blood flow and suboptimal nutrient uptake as the status quo for normal couch potatoes. People who regularly elevate thier heartrate for extended periods of time are probably better off in this regard and may not have a histamine response if they were to flush.

V

For toxin flushing have you considered Bentonite Clay?

[quote]Vegita wrote:
To flush we pop down two 500 MG tabs of niacin. We drink a lot of water before and during also as you are trying to flush your system of toxins. [/quote]

The whole idea of flushing mysterious, nameless “toxins” this way is bunk.

Besides, simply exercising does a much better job of increasing capillary blood flow.

Have you ever experienced a niacin flush? Histamine has a pretty clear role in the body, so when it’s activated on a massive scale, I’d say something to do with toxicity or cellular damage is going on.

V

[quote]Vegita wrote:
Have you ever experienced a niacin flush? Histamine has a pretty clear role in the body, so when it’s activated on a massive scale, I’d say something to do with toxicity or cellular damage is going on.

V[/quote]

I’ve taken niacin many times and have experienced the flush, but I’d never claim or expect it to have anything to do with nutrient delivery or detoxing, whatever that means.

I started jogging again after quitting cardio completely for three months and after a good 10km run had this irritating red rash on my stomach and quads. I didn’t know what it was. Now i know.

I’m not on any niacin cycle or anything, just normal multivitamins that contain B3-vitamin.

I just learned this recently: Niacin increases insulin resistance. The effect can be reduced through exercise but nobody here would go that far, right :slight_smile:

Edit: Whoops, forgot the link: http://heartscanblog.blogspot.com/2009/12/if-you-take-niacin-you-must-exercise.html

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[quote]bushidobadboy wrote:
I was just discussing this yesterday with a pharmacist, believe it or not.

He is helping me formulate the ‘ideal’ peri-workout drink for my UK athletes. I wanted to include a blood plasma volumiser but couldn’t think of a dry one off the top of my head.

He suggested that niacin would facilite the muscle pump instead. We discussed the skin flush.

Now correct me if I’m wrong, but the term ‘flush’ in this specific instance refers to the red flush of the skin, not some sort of ‘toilet flush’, i.e. toxin removal.

Whe you dose up niacin, you dilate the capilleries in both muscle and skin. The increased cutaneous perfusion and hence temperature, causes a histamine release which drives the itch response. The more you scratch, the more histamine is released from RBCs (to a point) which drives further irritation.

BBB
[/quote]

Yes, I can attest to this.

[quote]DoubleDuce wrote:

[quote]bushidobadboy wrote:
I was just discussing this yesterday with a pharmacist, believe it or not.

He is helping me formulate the ‘ideal’ peri-workout drink for my UK athletes. I wanted to include a blood plasma volumiser but couldn’t think of a dry one off the top of my head.

He suggested that niacin would facilite the muscle pump instead. We discussed the skin flush.

Now correct me if I’m wrong, but the term ‘flush’ in this specific instance refers to the red flush of the skin, not some sort of ‘toilet flush’, i.e. toxin removal.

Whe you dose up niacin, you dilate the capilleries in both muscle and skin. The increased cutaneous perfusion and hence temperature, causes a histamine release which drives the itch response. The more you scratch, the more histamine is released from RBCs (to a point) which drives further irritation.

BBB
[/quote]

Yes, I can attest to this.[/quote]
Can’t it mean both. You’d think that dialateing capillaries would help exchange of nutrients to the cells and toxins away from the cells.

Are we certain that the flush is a result of histamine release instead of PGD2?

Take aspirin a little before your next flush and see what happens.

[quote]anonym wrote:
Are we certain that the flush is a result of histamine release instead of PGD2?

Take aspirin a little before your next flush and see what happens.[/quote]

I think there is a little confusion. The “flush” is called that because your skin flushes red. What is actually occuring is the capillaries are dialating causing enhanced blood flow. This enhanced blood flow causes the skin to appear to redded since there are a lot of cappilaries in the skin. Now, the histamine is released by the cells of the body because they have toxins to release. For example if you get bit by a bug or maybe get some poison ivy on you, your cells that are effected will release histamine. They do this so that your body increases the blood flow to the area to help remove the toxins more quickly. In a niacin flush, the histamine isn’t causing the flush, the flush is allowing the cells to respond to increased blood flow, the come out of a semi dormany state and release histamine.

At least thats when basically all the literature I have read on it says occurs. Let me put it this way, I have not read anything that counters that and I have done several hours of reading up on it form any source I possibly could.

V

[quote]juanke wrote:

[quote]DoubleDuce wrote:

[quote]bushidobadboy wrote:
I was just discussing this yesterday with a pharmacist, believe it or not.

He is helping me formulate the ‘ideal’ peri-workout drink for my UK athletes. I wanted to include a blood plasma volumiser but couldn’t think of a dry one off the top of my head.

He suggested that niacin would facilite the muscle pump instead. We discussed the skin flush.

Now correct me if I’m wrong, but the term ‘flush’ in this specific instance refers to the red flush of the skin, not some sort of ‘toilet flush’, i.e. toxin removal.

Whe you dose up niacin, you dilate the capilleries in both muscle and skin. The increased cutaneous perfusion and hence temperature, causes a histamine release which drives the itch response. The more you scratch, the more histamine is released from RBCs (to a point) which drives further irritation.

BBB
[/quote]

Yes, I can attest to this.[/quote]
Can’t it mean both. You’d think that dialateing capillaries would help exchange of nutrients to the cells and toxins away from the cells.
[/quote]

I was attesting to the fact that yes, the flush refers to reddening. and 2 the correctly described physical symptoms.