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Newbie Asks about Heavy Lifters with High Bodyfat %

Hi guys, I have a question that I need answered. Please understand that I literally just started getting into the health scene. I recently lost 50 pounds, I’m 190 now, but still unhealthy in terms of nutrition.

I lost my weight purely on cardio and if I could do it all over again using weight training instead, I would. I’m glad I found this website, but wish I did so before I started to change my life. I’m starting weight training now, but I have a question regarding heavy lifting.

Here’s the question.

Why do the people who lift really heavy, typically have a bigger fat percentage than those with less muscle mass? Why aren’t their physiques leaner? I mean, I never see ‘lean’ people in weight lifting competitions, only larger guys.

Do they use it as extra stores of energy? Perhaps I am understanding something wrong, but don’t those who lift the heaviest have the most muscle and shouldn’t their metabolisms be extremely powerful in the sense of burning fat stores?

I hope I don’t get flamed. I apologize if this is a ‘dumb’ question, which it probably is. Please set me straight. Please educate me.

Thanks

[quote]jbasker33 wrote:
Hi guys, I have a question that I need answered. Please understand that I literally just started getting into the health scene. I recently lost 50 pounds, I’m 190 now, but still unhealthy in terms of nutrition.

I lost my weight purely on cardio and if I could do it all over again using weight training instead, I would. I’m glad I found this website, but wish I did so before I started to change my life. I’m starting weight training now, but I have a question regarding heavy lifting.

Here’s the question.

Why do the people who lift really heavy, typically have a bigger fat percentage than those with less muscle mass? Why aren’t their physiques leaner? I mean, I never see ‘lean’ people in weight lifting competitions, only larger guys.

Do they use it as extra stores of energy? Perhaps I am understanding something wrong, but don’t those who lift the heaviest have the most muscle and shouldn’t their metabolisms be extremely powerful in the sense of burning fat stores?

I hope I don’t get flamed. I apologize if this is a ‘dumb’ question, which it probably is. Please set me straight. Please educate me.

Thanks[/quote]

That would be because the people that compete in powerlifting compete in powerlifting, not bodybuilding. There’s advantages to being fatter (stronger in the hole on squats, less distance for the bar to move on bench).

You can lift heavy and be lean, it’s all about your goals and how you structure your diet around them. Diet will determine how you control your weight.

Start your research with the stickies at the top of this forum. Read. And start training ASAP.

The starting strength program is a good bet:

As far as diet it’s simple:
-eat at least 6 times a day
-Each meal should contain protein
-Put carbs around your work outs (before, during, after) or at breakfast only.
-eat tons of veggies and fruits (emphasis on veggies)

So a Sample diet:
meal 1
4 eggs, broccoli, oatmeal (if you want)

meal 2:
protein shake or 6ish ounces of lean meat, veggies, some healthy fat like olive oil or almonds

Meal 3: Pre/post work out
protien shake after wards, eat some carbs (doesn’t really matter, just get something that you can do consistantly for the next year or so, and stick to it). Obviously stuff like Surge from Biotest is the ideal, but if that can’t happen, just get some food in you post work out

Meal 4:
Oatmeal, 6-8oz. meat, veggies

meal 5:
meat, veggies, healthy fats

Meal 6:
Cottage cheese, celery or some other fibrous veggie

This post is being pretty nice. do not expect us to do the work for you. Read up on a few things (like the starting strength program) or JB 7 habits article (http://www.T-Nation.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance_diet_nutrition_bodybuilding/7_habits_of_highly_effective_nutritional_programs) and apply them. Come back if you have any questions.

Edit: I realize you didn’t really ask for any of that, but you seemed a bit lost, so I thought I might give some direction.

agreed that it helps, when i bulk my bench goes up and i actually feel better, my shoudler pressing goes up i can get more momentum for when i thor the shotputt as well, also being 6’5’’ my limbs are small if i dont carry some fat, and it def helps with the squat i wont lie.
if u see bench specialists, most have a huge gut cuz it shortens their stroke, also look up scott mendalson and matt kroc they are relatively lean men

[quote]bignate wrote:
matt kroc they are relatively lean men[/quote]

true story. Matt Kroc was down right shredded in the photos from his last meet on EliteFTS.

http://asp.elitefts.com/qa/training-logs.asp?qid=79599&tid=126

[quote]jbasker33 wrote:
Hi guys, I have a question that I need answered. Please understand that I literally just started getting into the health scene. I recently lost 50 pounds, I’m 190 now, but still unhealthy in terms of nutrition.

I lost my weight purely on cardio and if I could do it all over again using weight training instead, I would. I’m glad I found this website, but wish I did so before I started to change my life. I’m starting weight training now, but I have a question regarding heavy lifting.

Here’s the question.

Why do the people who lift really heavy, typically have a bigger fat percentage than those with less muscle mass? Why aren’t their physiques leaner? I mean, I never see ‘lean’ people in weight lifting competitions, only larger guys.

Do they use it as extra stores of energy? Perhaps I am understanding something wrong, but don’t those who lift the heaviest have the most muscle and shouldn’t their metabolisms be extremely powerful in the sense of burning fat stores?

I hope I don’t get flamed. I apologize if this is a ‘dumb’ question, which it probably is. Please set me straight. Please educate me.

Thanks[/quote]

like what was said earlier, leverages get more favorable in most lifts the fatter you get(not to much the deadlift though). Where you’ll see leaner guys is in the lighter and middle of the weightclass spectrum of power and weightlifting. If you’re a SHW with no weight restrictions, being huge deffinately helps.