T Nation

New W/O..Keep Body Guessing

I have been wanting to create a workout program that will most likely be 4-5 days a week, working the whole body…some times major parts and minor parts but still a whole body workout.

The thing that i have been trying to create is that i never do the same workout, i have been looking online to see if there is a workout generator that can generate a workout if i put in different types of exercises…does anyone know if one exists

anyway my basic plan is to find a shit load of exercises for different parts of the body…using explosive excelsiors, endurance,strength building and various other ones to create a year long workout routine. My body will never adapt to the same workout because it will all be different every time.

Has anyone tried this, someone told me about training like this but they didn’t go into great detail.

To do an explosivee excelsior, before you lift you need to grasp your wand, think of your happiest moment and cry “EXPLOSIVE EXCELSIOOOOOOR!” and it will all just happen for you.

The old ‘keep your body guessing’ by changing up your workouts once every 5 minutes is one of the most stupid fitness fallacies. In reality, there are only a handful or really, really good exercises and if you just keep adding weight in them, maybe switching some around every 12 weeks or so, you can make continual progress. ADDING LOAD is enough to elicit a growth response, i.e., adaptation to environment.

Changing your workouts too often will lead to stagnation. A good rule to follow is to stick to a program for 1-2 months.

The thing you’re describing is similar to the training of the 300 cast members, and it did work for them for a while.

[quote]undeadlift wrote:
Changing your workouts too often will lead to stagnation. A good rule to follow is to stick to a program for 1-2 months.

The thing you’re describing is similar to the training of the 300 cast members, and it did work for them for a while.[/quote]

A good rule to follow is to stick with a program for as long as it is working, whether that be weeks or years.

Changing a program that is giving you results based purely on an arbitrary time period is ridiculous.

As far as I can gather the argument is that after 4-6 weeks the body adapts and progress stagnates. To me that means that the reason for change should be the stagnation of progress not because 4-6 weeks has elapsed.

If your progress hasn’t stagnated the theory isn’t applicable and should be ignored.

[quote]IQ wrote:
undeadlift wrote:
Changing your workouts too often will lead to stagnation. A good rule to follow is to stick to a program for 1-2 months.

The thing you’re describing is similar to the training of the 300 cast members, and it did work for them for a while.

A good rule to follow is to stick with a program for as long as it is working, whether that be weeks or years.

Changing a program that is giving you results based purely on an arbitrary time period is ridiculous.

As far as I can gather the argument is that after 4-6 weeks the body adapts and progress stagnates. To me that means that the reason for change should be the stagnation of progress not because 4-6 weeks has elapsed.

If your progress hasn’t stagnated the theory isn’t applicable and should be ignored.[/quote]

Depending on your goals, changing routines based on an arbitrary time period isn’t ridiculous. Say you have 6 months to train and your goal is to become good at an explosive skill. You’d spend the first few weeks building anatomic adaptations, then you’ll intensify your training the next few weeks to have a solid strength foundation, then you’ll train the last few weeks for the expolsive skill you should be good at. Regardless if you’re still improving in the anatomic adaptation phase, you have to move on to a new program to meet your objective.

What you’re saying is more applicable for those with no time-restricted goals.

My opinoin your strength will stay staggnant as far as certain lifts go but you might get some good developement out of it. In fact the end result might be you going back to the old routine and in time that could help you. At least it won’t be boring.

[quote]undeadlift wrote:
Depending on your goals, changing routines based on an arbitrary time period isn’t ridiculous. Say you have 6 months to train and your goal is to become good at an explosive skill. You’d spend the first few weeks building anatomic adaptations, then you’ll intensify your training the next few weeks to have a solid strength foundation, then you’ll train the last few weeks for the expolsive skill you should be good at. Regardless if you’re still improving in the anatomic adaptation phase, you have to move on to a new program to meet your objective.

What you’re saying is more applicable for those with no time-restricted goals.[/quote]

As you would be changing your program at specific times for a specific reason the time periods wouldn’t be considered arbitrary.

Changing your program just because or based on a theory which may not even be applicable would be considered arbitrary.

[quote]wsk wrote:
The old ‘keep your body guessing’ by changing up your workouts once every 5 minutes is one of the most stupid fitness fallacies. In reality, there are only a handful or really, really good exercises and if you just keep adding weight in them, maybe switching some around every 12 weeks or so, you can make continual progress. ADDING LOAD is enough to elicit a growth response, i.e., adaptation to environment. [/quote]

This I agree with 100%. Many people seem to way overcomplicate training. Find a way to train that fits your schedule goals and recovery ability, if one thing goes flat(bench press for example) don’t toss the whole program, just make a minor adjustment by switching out the exercise to say incline presses and continuing moving upwards on that. If you do full body one month, and HIT the next, a 5 day split after that, how in the world are you going to know what works well for you?

[quote]wsk wrote:
The old ‘keep your body guessing’ by changing up your workouts once every 5 minutes is one of the most stupid fitness fallacies. In reality, there are only a handful or really, really good exercises and if you just keep adding weight in them, maybe switching some around every 12 weeks or so, you can make continual progress. ADDING LOAD is enough to elicit a growth response, i.e., adaptation to environment. [/quote]

This I agree with 100%. Many people seem to way overcomplicate training. Find a way to train that fits your schedule goals and recovery ability, if one thing goes flat(bench press for example) don’t toss the whole program, just make a minor adjustment by switching out the exercise to say incline presses and continuing moving upwards on that.

If you do full body one month, and HIT the next, a 5 day split after that, how in the world are you going to know what works well for you?

i tihnk i found a the program i was looking for, Mod Lionel sent me a message with this progam in mind…

http://www.T-Nation.com/readTopic.do?id=459216

i think it fits my needs, rock on

[quote]scottiscool wrote:
wsk wrote:
The old ‘keep your body guessing’ by changing up your workouts once every 5 minutes is one of the most stupid fitness fallacies. In reality, there are only a handful or really, really good exercises and if you just keep adding weight in them, maybe switching some around every 12 weeks or so, you can make continual progress. ADDING LOAD is enough to elicit a growth response, i.e., adaptation to environment.

This I agree with 100%. Many people seem to way overcomplicate training. Find a way to train that fits your schedule goals and recovery ability, if one thing goes flat(bench press for example) don’t toss the whole program, just make a minor adjustment by switching out the exercise to say incline presses and continuing moving upwards on that. If you do full body one month, and HIT the next, a 5 day split after that, how in the world are you going to know what works well for you?[/quote]

Haha, go Scott…Cycles for pennies ought to be stickied on every forum. Training for bodybuilding does not need to be this complicated.