T Nation

New to Weight Training, Where Do I Begin?


#1

Today I just started weight lifting because I would like to get much bigger for myself and sport and maybe powerlifting. I’m about 183cm (6’0"), 93kg (205lbs) today I only maxed on lifts which were: Deadlift 236kg (520lbs), Squat 193kg (425lbs), Bench Press 147kg (325lbs), OHP 93kg (205lbs), Power Clean 114 kg (250lbs).

I know these are only very average numbers but I mainly want to get bigger what methods should I use to get big?


#2

You’ve never worked out before and you maxed with those numbers? Is this real life or do you have a very physically demanding job?


#3

“I know these are only very average numbers but I mainly want to get bigger what methods should I use to get big?”

Welp, looks like I’ll go back to baking cookies in my easy bake oven.


#4

What? Are those not extremely average numbers? I’m a carpenter and blacksmith. I suppose those are fairly demanding jobs, not anything out of the ordinary. I’m one of the smaller guys in my family too. My father is about 6’2" and 250lbs, my brother who is 16 is already 6’3" and about 210.


#5

Average for 2-5 years of dedicated training, I guess.


#6

So would I get any significant mass gains doing something like German Volume Training (or am I too new or strong enough to get any type of return from it?) or should I pursue strength more. I read earlier that a lot of the best bodybuilders did a lot of powerlifting before they got more into bodybuilding.


#7

[quote]KingTelcontar wrote:
So would I get any significant mass gains doing something like German Volume Training (or am I too new or strong enough to get any type of return from it?) or should I pursue strength more. I read earlier that a lot of the best bodybuilders did a lot of powerlifting before they got more into bodybuilding.
[/quote]

If you really lift the numbers that you claim you do (not calling you a liar, those are just very rare beginner numbers), then you’re a very, very strong SOB. I’d recommend that you spend a few weeks lifting with fairly high frequency while having someone look at your technique (I think this is where starting strength does work well - it gives you a lot of opportunities to practice) and then transition into a program like 5/3/1 with the boring but big template.


#8

I didn’t even think these were anywhere near any kind of impressive weights. I’ll try to take a video of it all and post it here the next time I max.


#9

So you recommend doing starting strength for a few weeks?


#10

I just bought the Beyond 5/3/1 book as well due to the popularity of 5/3/1 the more I look into pursuing strength.


#11

Also I don’t know how I would get anyone to look at my lifting technique unless I post it here. I’ve been going to the gym very early in the morning, and no one else is there.


#12

Those are fantastic numbers for a beginner.

Yep do one of the basic templates from ‘Beyond’ and your strength should skyrocket

reading a bunch of articles by guys like Dan John and John Meadows will really help with training and diet…


#13

I’ll comp the others: You’re strong guy. Just make sure your lifts were/are technically okay and not to use grinded half ass reps as 1RM.

And the 5/3/1 is excellent way to go. Read also the Beyond 5/3/1 and Jim’s recent articles from the homepage. If you do things right you’ll be in really impressive shape after couple years.


#14

[quote]KingTelcontar wrote:
I just bought the Beyond 5/3/1 book as well due to the popularity of 5/3/1 the more I look into pursuing strength.[/quote]

Do any version of 531 in the book and you’ll be fine.

Post videos ASAP.

If those are actually your lifts they are fantastic for a beginner. You’re around the same height and weight as I am and my lifts are very close to yours after 18 months of powerlifting and overall 5 years of training.


#15

When and where should I post videos? I don’t know If you guys would be interested in watching max rep attempts or should I wait till the end of the 6 week cycle on the 5/3/1+ week? Should I start a training log on here?


#16

[quote]KingTelcontar wrote:
Should I start a training log on here?[/quote]

I think that would be appreciated by many.

I so wish you had a trainer for your first session. Imagine the poor fool being told their client never lifted a bar then have them almost topple a 200kg squat on you.


#17

[quote]KingTelcontar wrote:
When and where should I post videos? I don’t know If you guys would be interested in watching max rep attempts or should I wait till the end of the 6 week cycle on the 5/3/1+ week? Should I start a training log on here?[/quote]

I’ll follow it.


#18

[quote]KingTelcontar wrote:
When and where should I post videos? I don’t know If you guys would be interested in watching max rep attempts or should I wait till the end of the 6 week cycle on the 5/3/1+ week? Should I start a training log on here?[/quote]

Upload videos on youtube, then post the “share” link (you know, the one that actually goes “youtu.be”) in this thread. This is as much for us as it is for you; I’m sure we’re all curious as hell at this point.

Also, Jim Wendler recently wrote a terrific article on getting started… (I’d post a link but the admins would delete it)

"Step One:

Get the book Starting Strength. Learn how to squat, press, bench press and deadlift. Follow Markâ??s recommendations for learning and progressing the lifts. Mark is a friend of mine. Mark is also the best resource anyone has on beginners learning how to do the lifts and do them correctly. Do this for 3 months. Donâ??t change your diet. Donâ??t add in anything. Donâ??t take out anything. Just do this. Besides the lifting, I want everyone to do the Agile 8 EVERY SINGLE day. Doesnâ??t matter when you do it, just do it. In summary: get the book Starting Strength, do Agile 8.
Step Two:

Get the book 5/3/1 2nd Edition. Once you have learned the lifts, follow the 5/3/1 program 2-3 days a week. The only assistance work you will do other than the main lifts are bodyweight oriented (push-ups, sit-ups, back raises, chins/pull-ups, inverted rows, one-leg squats, lunges, step-ups, planks). Do this for 3 months.

Summary: do the 5/3/1 program, bodyweight work and continue to do the Agile 8 every day.

So now we have a very simple plan to follow for the first 6 months. All Iâ??m asking you to do is get the books and train 2-3 days/week with Agile 8 done every day.
Step Three:

Develop great eating habits. All diets suck unless they become habits. Losing weight is great but only smart, habit-fueled people can keep the weight off. And not ruin their lives in the process. Cutting and bulking are horrible ways of teaching you nothing. Smart eating habits make everything easy. To make things simple, Iâ??ve taken some knowledge and condensed it into 6 easy steps.
    Eat 3-5 meals/day.
    Have some kind of whole food protein at each meal (eggs, chicken, beef, fish). Full-fat meats/eggs are not bad.
    Have a fruit or vegetable at each meal. It doesnâ??t matter what kind â?? eat what you like.
    Drink no-calorie beverages. Yes, you can drink diet soda.
    Have some rice, potatoes, oatmeal, whole grain breads, pasta at each meal. Carbs are not the devil.
    All meals/food should be WHOLE food.

 

Thatâ??s it. This is called developing good eating habits. Eat less at each meal to lose weight. Eat more of each to gain weight. The key is to develop the protein/fruit-vegetable/carb guidelines at each meal. Donâ??t count calories.
Step Four:

After each lifting session, do some kind of conditioning work. This means running, biking, elliptical, pushing a sled, mobility circuit, etc. Doesnâ??t matter too much what you do other than you work for 20-30 minutes. Do NOT kill yourself on this. â??Killer conditioningâ?? is moronic. You work hard, smart and will be able to fight another day. This is to be added to your training after 6-9 months of lifting. Until you learn how to lift and be consistent, donâ??t add anything to it. This is to be done 2-3 days/week.

So in conclusion we are working first to develop great training habits and learn the technique. We will do the Agile 8 every single day to help grease the joints and work on feeling better in every day life. Then we will transition to the 5/3/1 program with bodyweight assistance work. Then great eating habits, which you can carry with you your entire life, are introduced. No more falling for diet bullshit! Think of all the money you will save. Finally, we will do some kind of conditioning work.
    Lift weights â?? 2-3 days/week.
    Conditioning â?? 2-3 days/week
    Agile 8 â?? every day
    Eating habits â?? set for life

Stop with the madness of the latest and shittiest trends. They all suck. Develop habits with tried and true methods, donâ??t overextend yourself and think about LONG TERM results. 365 days from now, where will you be? Small steps lead to great rewards."

#19

Hey guys, the new format wouldn’t let me sign in so I had to make an alternate. Here’s Monday and Tuesday’s workout. Posting this before I head out train. I’ve been really tired this week forging a table and chandelier while building a new forge so bear with my numbers please.

Monday:
Deadlift training max:475
310x5
355x5
405x5+ (405x13)
I did five reps double overhand but I had to concentrate too hard on squeezing the bar and it made me feel like my form was breaking down so I stopped and grabbed some strap things I saw people using. I tried using the alternate grip on my warm ups but it felt really awkward and I didn’t feel as powerful in the position it put me in. On my second set with the straps I did 13 reps.

Squat 5x10x275

I did 3x10x225 but I didnt feel like I was doing any work.

Tuesday:
OHP TM: 185

120x5
140x5
160x5+ (160x10)

I feel really weak with these. It’s discouraging that I can’t even do reps with my bodyweight on OHP.

Bench Press 5x10x225
These felt really easy but my elbows hurt pretty bad from working the anvil most of the day.

I warmed up with 2x25 pull-ups and did 5x10x205 Bent-Over rows. My hamstrings are pretty angry at me while bending over whilst doing these.


#20

Try elbow sleeves. They can be a big help