New to Powerlifting

hey guys
im new to the whole weight training thing so i expect to cop some shit for what may be obvious to most of you.
Ive dropped 30kgs with kettlebells over the last 6 months i used to look 9 months pregnant now much better.

I want to hit the weights and build some solid strength but honestly have no idea where to start, theres so mush crap on the net, but t nation has a good rep.

Im 48 yo 5"10, 115kgs, relatively injury free and want to get a lot stronger not particularly interested in body building, the pure strength aspect of pl really appeals to me. So any advice on programs etc would be appreciated. I invested in a couple of hundred kilos of weights a couple of good bars and a good bench and squat rack.

Treat this like a noob question because it is.
thanks in advance

First, welcome and congrats on the big weight loss and lifestyle change. And to help address your goals there are quite a few possibilities for you. First start by learning all you can about the 3 lifts, and practice them as often as you can. A lot of people would recommend you do Starting Strength, or a basic 5x5 program. Which are fine choices for a beginner, but I’ve never been the biggest fan of premade cookie cutter programs. If your goal is to just get stronger, train hard 4 or 5 times a week. Squat 2x a week if you can, bench 2x a week. Deadlift if you are comfortable with it. Do lots of upper back work, like rows, pullups etc. Maybe bench 1x a week and overhead press seated or standing the other day.

You have lots of options and you are only limited by your effort and recovery abilities.

Thanks for that any and all advice gratefully received

[quote]cparker wrote:
First, welcome and congrats on the big weight loss and lifestyle change. And to help address your goals there are quite a few possibilities for you. First start by learning all you can about the 3 lifts, and practice them as often as you can. A lot of people would recommend you do Starting Strength, or a basic 5x5 program. Which are fine choices for a beginner, but I’ve never been the biggest fan of premade cookie cutter programs. If your goal is to just get stronger, train hard 4 or 5 times a week. Squat 2x a week if you can, bench 2x a week. Deadlift if you are comfortable with it. Do lots of upper back work, like rows, pullups etc. Maybe bench 1x a week and overhead press seated or standing the other day.

You have lots of options and you are only limited by your effort and recovery abilities. [/quote]

Pretty much everything he said. I’d add that if you are comfortable dead lifting, treat is as similarly to the squat as you can. Just be aware it can really, REALLY drain you. Also, don’t neglect overhead pressing just to keep your shoulders happy (I’d say a 2:1 or even 3:1 bench:press volume ratio would be decent).

I’d also recommend working on being able to do pull ups. They’re horrible to start with and stay that way for about three months but nothing beats the feeling of being able to do even three or so happily (my best is three sets of six at 190, so I’m still royally crap at them but I love doing them now). The back and core strength you’ll get from doing them will drive your big three as well. The biggest help for me was doing isometric holds of about two seconds with a slow lowering.

Make sure you have good technique, that’ll help you stay injury and pain free.

Finally, record every session: what you did, how it felt, what to improve on, etc.

Hey man welcome to the sport!

Best advice I can give you is KISS (Keep It Simple Stupid for those who’ll miss that and think it was a typo Lol)

People are going to drum into your head all these things you should be doing, shouldn’t be doing, reasons as to why you should X, Y, and Z. So I am just going to post the most important and overlooked aspect of powerlifting…

You have to keep it simple and have to keep it fun. This is a sport that can be daunting at times, and flat out suck at others; but that is nothing to be afraid of. You just have to remember to find out what works and what works for you and stick to them.

There is no one way to skin a cat, and just the same there is no one way to be a great powerlifter.

You got guys like Louie Simmons and Matt Wenning who believe conjugate method for life.
Than there’s guys like Casey Williams and Clint Darden (strongman) who use 5/3/1
Than there’s guys like Chris Duffin and Dan Green who just say screw it and do their own thing

The point I am trying to make is that since there is no one way to build a powerlifter, you might as figure out what kind of programming you like than pick that and run with it.

If you like doing mostly high reps and peaking over long periods of time, look into George Leeman
If you like doing increasingly more sets, all at equal level of intensity. Look into Dan Green or Sheiko.
If you like bare bones work, heavy and fast doubles, and minimal assistance work with a twist, look into Chris Duffin.
Want to make weekly? Look up the conjugate system or any of their big followers for learning to apply it.

But good luck man, have fun with it, keep and open mind, and take no shit when people overstep.

As others have said, many different approaches will work, especially at this stage. I would recommend a simple 5x5 double progression (5 sets with same weight, aiming for 5 reps each. If you get 5, increase weight next session; if you get 3/4 reps on one or two sets, stick with the same weight until you get 5x5), training 1-3 times a week for each lift. A couple of good setups would be:-

Mon
Squat 5x5 etc.

Tue
Bench 5x5 etc.

Wed
Deadlift 5x5 etc.

Thu
Bench 5x5 etc.

Fri
Squat 5x5

Weekend
REST

Or, if you want something a bit different:-

Mon
Squat 5x5 etc.

Tue
Bench 5x5 etc.

Wed
Off

Thu
Deadlift 5x5 etc.

Fri
Off

Sat
Singles on all lifts, either in a tri-set or separately; so -
Squat: 20 singles @ 80%
Bench: 20 singles @ 80%
Deadlift: 20 singles @ 70-80% (focus on moving quickly and efficiently)

Complete each exercise (20 singles) in <20 mins, and don’t increase weight until sets feel explosive and technique is acceptable from the first rep to the last. If 20 singles seems too much, just start off with 10-15.
Whenever I use singles my technique and “ease” under the bar improve dramatically - something to consider if powerlifting competitively is an ambition at all.