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New PB but is it a Deadlift?

Hey guys, just wondered if you woilfnt mind critiquing my deadlift? New PB at 150kg but want to break any bad habits as early as possible. Thanks in advance.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=31kB3QIgnsE

i can’t get the video to load, but it’s a deadlift. as long as you picked it up off the floor and locked it out, the lift counts. i guess you could get red lights for a “hitch”, but I don’t find that to really help much… this doesn’t mean your technique can’t improve (it almost always can), but deadlift is the only lift you can’t cheat.

Thanks for replying. I thought the video was playing up so here’s a link. The title of the post was more about my technique than anything. I know its a deadlift, just not sure if its a good one! :smiley:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=31kB3QIgnsE&feature=youtube_gdata_player

Dude, get set before you pull. Get down to the bar in the position you’re gonna start your pull, get your chest out, hips to the right depth, hips and legs ready to push, squeeze the bar and commit. Don’t walk up and just wing it, know exactly what you’re gonna do and what position every joint is going to be in and know you’re gonna get the pull and not give up. I’d drop your weight and work on your form and committing to every rep for a little.

Holy crap batman! You ginned around at the bar for freaking ages! You played with your grip, your stance, must have been psyching yourself up at the same time.

Get set, think about the lift, walk up, get in position and pull.

I thought it was a good lift. A quick lift once you actually pulled it. Looked easy as pie. A video that’s not upside down and slightly closer couldn’t hurt either.

[quote]sexyxe wrote:
I thought it was a good lift. A quick lift once you actually pulled it. Looked easy as pie. A video that’s not upside down and slightly closer couldn’t hurt either. [/quote]

+1. The lift was good, the hesitation wasn’t.

Hey guys, thanks for the replies. I didn’t realise at the time quite how long I was taking over it. I guess I may have been due to the fact I wasn’t sure if I’d manage it! Taking it all in for my next hams session though. Thanks for the feedback!

With all due respect to Andrew, I disagree with a couple things he said. The deadlift is not a technical lift, it’s a brute strength/adrenaline lift. Plenty of lifters use the ‘grip and rip’ technique, where you basically only get set the instant before you start lifting.

Your head was not in the right place for this attempt. You wasted a TON of energy on those first couple attempts. Don’t be so scared. You also need to know how you’re going to grip the bar in the first place. That’s basic. What you did was crazy. You were clearly strong enough to lift the weight. I don’t see any reason to drop weight for technique work. My guess is you just don’t have a ton of experience with near-max deadlifts.

You have to commit to the lift. Don’t give yourself multiple tries. Your first attempt should be the best one. Give the first attempt EVERYTHING you’ve got. Don’t let failure be an option.

I do have 1 comment about your setup though. It’s hard to see in the video, but it sort of looks like the bar is starting out over your toes. The bar should be aligned more with the middle of your foot. Bar position is the only thing I get set before I pull. I get my feet set under the bar for a few seconds, then I start my pull the second my grip is set.

After the second fail, I woulda said screw it, props.

[quote]flipcollar wrote:
With all due respect to Andrew, I disagree with a couple things he said. The deadlift is not a technical lift, it’s a brute strength/adrenaline lift. Plenty of lifters use the ‘grip and rip’ technique, where you basically only get set the instant before you start lifting.

Your head was not in the right place for this attempt. You wasted a TON of energy on those first couple attempts. Don’t be so scared. You also need to know how you’re going to grip the bar in the first place. That’s basic. What you did was crazy. You were clearly strong enough to lift the weight. I don’t see any reason to drop weight for technique work. My guess is you just don’t have a ton of experience with near-max deadlifts.

You have to commit to the lift. Don’t give yourself multiple tries. Your first attempt should be the best one. Give the first attempt EVERYTHING you’ve got. Don’t let failure be an option.

I do have 1 comment about your setup though. It’s hard to see in the video, but it sort of looks like the bar is starting out over your toes. The bar should be aligned more with the middle of your foot. Bar position is the only thing I get set before I pull. I get my feet set under the bar for a few seconds, then I start my pull the second my grip is set.[/quote]

Well put
I guess what I described to him was more how I started when I was learning/just starting deadlifts, which doesn’t mean it’s right for everybody. But I do stand by my saying know what you’re gonna do and what position you’re gonna be in before you step up to the bar and start your pull.

[quote]Andrewdwatters1 wrote:

[quote]flipcollar wrote:
With all due respect to Andrew, I disagree with a couple things he said. The deadlift is not a technical lift, it’s a brute strength/adrenaline lift. Plenty of lifters use the ‘grip and rip’ technique, where you basically only get set the instant before you start lifting.

Your head was not in the right place for this attempt. You wasted a TON of energy on those first couple attempts. Don’t be so scared. You also need to know how you’re going to grip the bar in the first place. That’s basic. What you did was crazy. You were clearly strong enough to lift the weight. I don’t see any reason to drop weight for technique work. My guess is you just don’t have a ton of experience with near-max deadlifts.

You have to commit to the lift. Don’t give yourself multiple tries. Your first attempt should be the best one. Give the first attempt EVERYTHING you’ve got. Don’t let failure be an option.

I do have 1 comment about your setup though. It’s hard to see in the video, but it sort of looks like the bar is starting out over your toes. The bar should be aligned more with the middle of your foot. Bar position is the only thing I get set before I pull. I get my feet set under the bar for a few seconds, then I start my pull the second my grip is set.[/quote]

Well put
I guess what I described to him was more how I started when I was learning/just starting deadlifts, which doesn’t mean it’s right for everybody. But I do stand by my saying know what you’re gonna do and what position you’re gonna be in before you step up to the bar and start your pull. [/quote]

Totally agree on that. That’s what I was saying was ridiculous. At the very least, he needs to know where he’s going to stand, and how he’s going to grip the bar, lol.

Wish is got a video of the second lift at the same weight cos I’m pretty sure I walked straight up and lifted. Although I thought I’d dine that on the first lift lol! I guess I need to run through the lifts in my head a little more before I approach the bar from now on!

My .02 cents: I like to grip and rip. But grip-and-rip doesn’t mean haphazard set up. I like to get focused; get my body in the position I want it to be in; take in a big breath and push the air against my belt; them drop down smoothly and deliberately and pick it up in one fluid motion. Fucking around over bar and not getting a breath in before the decent costs you significant pounds, IMO.

[quote]matt_e_hyde wrote:
Wish is got a video of the second lift at the same weight cos I’m pretty sure I walked straight up and lifted. Although I thought I’d dine that on the first lift lol! I guess I need to run through the lifts in my head a little more before I approach the bar from now on![/quote]

The fact that you “thought you’d done that on the first lift”, honestly, is scary. You picked the bar off the ground 2-3 times before you actually performed the lift.

i appreciate jj’s post. Grip and rip definitely doesn’t mean to just fuck around and do whatever. It should absolutely be repeatable. That’s really the whole point of it - simplicity and repeatability. Finding the right groove without excessive energy expenditure.

Just out of curiosity, what’s the actual issue with taking my time at the bar? And we talking about the amount of time spent STANDING or down in position to lift?

[quote]matt_e_hyde wrote:
Just out of curiosity, what’s the actual issue with taking my time at the bar? And we talking about the amount of time spent STANDING or down in position to lift?[/quote]

It’s mostly a mental thing. Most people who spend too much time on their setup are psyching themselves out of the lift. Spend as much time as you want preparing for the lift in terms of psyching yourself up, but once you’re actually down in position, you need to be ready to pull.

Once you’re in position, you need to maintain tightness through your core, lats, etc, and you’re more likely to loose this tightness if you wait too long to pull.

So I’m guessing that being down in position for the pull for too long would mean I’m more likely to “soften up” as it were and potentially injure myself through bad form?

Watch PeteS set up and grab the bar. Deliberate, no fucking around, get set, bend down, and pick it up, one smooth and controlled motion. I love this setup routine.

http://tnation.T-Nation.com/free_online_forum/sports_body_training_performance_bodybuilding_senior/log_40?id=5165624&pageNo=11

[quote]matt_e_hyde wrote:
So I’m guessing that being down in position for the pull for too long would mean I’m more likely to “soften up” as it were and potentially injure myself through bad form?[/quote]

No, it means that waiting too long means you will lose your confidence and body tension so you will miss the lift. Also, from a competitive powerlifting perspective, each time you grab the bar and lift it a single inch is one attempt. You would not get four attempts in a row. Once you touch the bar, you lift it within a few seconds. Period.

Honestly, I can’t even move the bar off the floor at all with a max deadlift unless I jerk my knees into the bar with a full breath of air and all my force applied. This is definitely not a max lift but a good PB at that!