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New Job Affecting Log Book

I’ve started a new job as a Bricklaying apprentice and it involves a lot of labouring at the moment, lifting things and it kinda wears me out by the end of the day so much so that it affects my lifts.

My gym opens at 6am and I was thinking… I start work at 7:30am, I currently do DC Training, I could go in, in the morning and do my Squatting, Deadlifting, Bench Pressing, OHP (the big movements I care about and be out of the gym by 7am to walk to work…

Then when I’ve finished work return to the gym to do the smaller things such as my biceps, triceps, back width, Hamstrings, Calves etc.

What do you think about getting the big things done early and returning to do the smaller things later.

I think there’s a lot of ways to succeed at combining lifting and manual labor. Your suggested solution could work, it potentially could also negatively impact your work which I’m sure your employer would not be pleased with.

You could simply stay the course, trying to include more food/sleep to aid in recovery if possible, and see how you adapt in 6-12 weeks. You might see stalling now, and renewed growth after adapting.

Some personal experimentation is probably the best solution.

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Should be fine.

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Sorry I didn’t clarify that I actually tried this too,

I started at 4000 cals… was hungry when I hit the gym which impacted performance

So I upped it to 5700 calories
Consisting of
Big tub of cereal + whole milk
4x Tuna mayo sandwiches
200g bag of Doritos (Not doritos supermarkets own cheaper brand lol)
500g Greek Yoghurt
Big Chicken + Rice meal

Its fucking hard to eat and they are big sandwiches I make and I munch on half a sandwich while I work + all the way up to the gym

I get 7 hours sleep, tried 8 didn’t do much different either.

My squats suffered today I was supposed to do 160kgx5 (got 157.5kgx5 last time) got 1 at nice depth and thought fuck nvm.

My lower back felt quite pumped I had my PL Belt on too most likely from carrying and picking blocks and big stone bricks up all day I try to not overdo it at work also for example I’ll just do 1 stone brick at a time rather than 3 at once because it is possible but I will feel fucked in 30 mins.

I’ve known plenty of lifters who do like you’re suggesting, large muscle group in the AM and small group or even just cardio in the PM.

Obviously you’re still new at your job, and you’re going to learn a lot in terms of how well you’re handling things in terms of time, recovery etc etc. Pay attention, realize that some things may take a while to adjust to, and if you find you need to try something else, it’s not always a negative.

S

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I think the only answer here is to try it out and see how it works. You know your body best. You might end up needing more recovery days from the gym though.

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You’ll adjust to the manual labour. Your work is basically a big GPP session. For a while, you’ll find gym performance drops. Then when you adapt, it’ll come back up.

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I guess you are right, I mean Geoff Capes was a labourer and won WSM lol, I was out of work for a year so it may do me some good.

About 12 years ago I had a walk on job doing residential roofing. Basically didn’t have any idea what I was getting myself in to and the first few weeks were brutal. I found that after a month or so of getting used to the motions and weight of equipment/bundles it just became second nature. Give it a month or two and things won’t seem nearly as bad as they are now.

I agree with the post above that says work is #1. If waking up earlier than normal and hitting the gym affects your work in any way I’d hold off and try it after you’ve adapted to the new workload a little bit better.

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GPP I’d agree now… been there coming up 4 weeks, passed up 2 whole pallets stacked really high of big stone bricks it was agonizing during it as while I may be strong it was more like cardio, had shoulder pumps from pressing 200 big stone bricks over my head… was a little gassed after but as of 10 mins later I was good, If I’d have done that in my first week I’d have been fucked lol.

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I’ve done the exact same job as you before. My dad did that job too, and is now a bricklayer, for about 15 years. He’s got a lot of wear and tear on his knees mostly, from kneeling all the time while laying block/brick/stone, and a lot of shoulder and back pain.

Anyway, he doesn’t lift. I did lift when I did it, and I would just go after work. I delivered newspapers 4am-7am, then ate breakfast and worked again 8am-5pm. Went to the gym as soon as I got off work. I would squat, deadlift, press, etc all after work. I’m a pretty big believer in the fact that if you train, for example, your lower back, and expect it to get stronger, it will get stronger. I’d say it really depends on your goals - I wanted to get better at the big lifts. So that’s why I trained them. If I wanted to improve conditioning or focus on size, I’d maybe do something different.

You’re pretty young right? My personal opinion, based on my own experience, is sleep as much as possible at night. I can fuction on 4-5 hours of sleep, but mentally it just feels great to know you get as much as possible each night. Lift after the gym, and like others have said, after some adapting, you won’t really be affected by lifting after work. I feel like the job is “easy” in the sense that it’s never like max effort work, just a lot of continuous semi-heavy work. You feel the burn for sure but definitely never exhausted if you’re eating and drinking enough.

Just my two cents. Best of luck! Do you have a log?

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Yes I’ve just turned 20, I get at least 7 hours of sleep and lots of food, I moved back from Doggcrapp training to 5/3/1 as it accounts for you having a shit day lol I feel like I am coming around now first few weeks I felt shattered but now I can be faster than the others at loading out blocks due to my strength and just finding it easy it was more of the conditioning aspect that fucked me but hey at least I am getting fitter lol.

Last year I remember reading WSBB Book of Secrets, Louie basically said a lot of the Russian athletes would work in the mines and it would help their work capacity and let them handle more training.