T Nation

New Client; Cardio Help

I have a new client, a middle aged businessman looking to lose weight and gain general physical conditioning. He’s not looking for a bb/pl routine; he cares more about losing a few inches and being in “better shape” than gaining inches on his biceps.

His old trainer used to run 4 or 5 miles with him, stopping every once in a while to do pushups, situps, etc. Or go biking or rowing with him and then hit the gym for some resistance training for maybe 30 minutes. 

My dilemma is that I have some nagging ankle and back injuries that prevent me from doing something like a 5 mile run. I have considered trying to convince him that he can still lose weight and look/feel better by gaining muscle and trying an interval running program (Running Man program on T-Nation). Or just saying sorry, it?s not a good fit and hope that he can find a trainer that will be able to help him out.

Any suggestions? Maybe creative ideas of how I would be able to train him?

I would try and convince him that the cardio can be second teer to the resistance training. If he’s that worried keep the resistance training to start fast paced.

Maybe EDT hell thats damn near very anabolic cardio he sure as hell wont get bored and will sweat like a beast.
Or a full body super set routine. Hit the weights right and then if he still wants and can let him do some cardio moderate to low intensity on lifting days.

He doesnt sound like a complete newbie. Introduce him to more advance cardio on non weights day HIIT etc more bang for the buck.

If no move on.

I second trying to explain to hin the relative effectiveness of weight v. cardio.
Also, take him down to a high school track and do some sprints, pylos etc.

[quote]aznhobo1 wrote:
I have a new client, a middle aged businessman looking to lose weight and gain general physical conditioning. He’s not looking for a bb/pl routine; he cares more about losing a few inches and being in “better shape” than gaining inches on his biceps.

His old trainer used to run 4 or 5 miles with him, stopping every once in a while to do pushups, situps, etc. Or go biking or rowing with him and then hit the gym for some resistance training for maybe 30 minutes. 

My dilemma is that I have some nagging ankle and back injuries that prevent me from doing something like a 5 mile run. I have considered trying to convince him that he can still lose weight and look/feel better by gaining muscle and trying an interval running program (Running Man program on T-Nation). Or just saying sorry, it?s not a good fit and hope that he can find a trainer that will be able to help him out.

Any suggestions? Maybe creative ideas of how I would be able to train him?

[/quote]

First off, a trainer is not a paid partner. You establish the program, you don’t necessarily have to run the 5 miles with him each time.

Second,why has he secured a new trainer. Maybe that system got old for him. Injuries? Loss of effectiveness?

Third, I would take a long serious look at his diet. Most people that run 4-5 miles, do pushups, situps, rowing, biking, and a 30 minute weight routine should be in pretty good shape. Only a real lack of intensity or a crappy diet would prevent that.

Lastly, and I’m sorry to say, if I was to hire a ‘trainer’ and that ‘trainer’ had to get advice on how to drop a couple pounds and improve my general physical conditioning, I might say “it’s not a good fit, I’ll just look around.”

Sorry if that’s harsh, but this isn’t a difficult situation. Analyze his past. Ask about successes and failures. Build a program around his interests and his goals.