T Nation

Need Help Creating a Nutrition and Weight Plan


#1

hey guys, I'm fairly new to weight lifting and dieting and could use some help. I'm 20yo, 145lbs slim build and 6'2. I'm really tired of always know getting gold that I'm skinny and I really wanna bulk up to help my confidence and bring me a better lifestyle. I've always been a skinny guy although I've never really paid attention to how much I'm eating and what I'm eating, I could a lot for a couple days and gain a few pounds but maybe eat 2 meals or just whenever was convenient for me then lose the pounds I had gained.

so I'm not really sure if I'm just a skinny guy who can't keep on the weight or if it's just my inconsistent eating habits. but I'm ready to become a new man. I've been trying to do research about what I should be eating and some exercise plans but there's just so much out there that I get frustrated and can't really make out a plan.

is there anybody that would be willing to help me? I could really use a set diet plan of simple foods I could find in my fridge right now and go from there. also a exercise plan that would correlate. I have a full set of dumbbells and a bench at home and I feel more comfortable lifting at home as I first start out. I'll most likely get a membership when I feel more confident in myself knowing what I'm actually doing haha. please, I would greatly appreciate some help


#2

You need to consistently eat more quality food to gain weight, that should be your main priority right now. In terms of workouts, any basic strength program will work for now. I’d recommend Starting Strength or Chris Colucci’s Teaching a kid to lift, but whatever floats your boat.


#3

[quote]dagill2 wrote:
You need to consistently eat more quality food to gain weight, that should be your main priority right now. In terms of workouts, any basic strength program will work for now. I’d recommend Starting Strength or Chris Colucci’s Teaching a kid to lift, but whatever floats your boat.[/quote]

x2

I was in your same spot when I was around your age, in the low 140s at 6’ and 18 y/o. Then I started drinking a mass gainer shake 3x a day and eating 3 squares a day. My training plan sucked but I hit it hard. The first time I did this I went from 140ish to over 160. The second time took me from the 160s to the 180s.

EDIT: not saying the training doesn’t matter, just not as much as nutrition. Pick a program designed by a pro.


#4

[quote]TX iron wrote:

[quote]dagill2 wrote:
You need to consistently eat more quality food to gain weight, that should be your main priority right now. In terms of workouts, any basic strength program will work for now. I’d recommend Starting Strength or Chris Colucci’s Teaching a kid to lift, but whatever floats your boat.[/quote]

x2

I was in your same spot when I was around your age, in the low 140s at 6’ and 18 y/o. Then I started drinking a mass gainer shake 3x a day and eating 3 squares a day. My training plan sucked but I hit it hard. The first time I did this I went from 140ish to over 160. The second time took me from the 160s to the 180s.

EDIT: not saying the training doesn’t matter, just not as much as nutrition. Pick a program designed by a pro. [/quote]

I had similar stats at a similar age as well. In many (climbing specific) ways I was strong as well, but I still weighed under 10 stone soaking wet because I didn’t eat enough. Moral of the story: nutrition is key to physique goals.


#5

[quote]

I had similar stats at a similar age as well. In many (climbing specific) ways I was strong as well, but I still weighed under 10 stone soaking wet because I didn’t eat enough. Moral of the story: nutrition is key to physique goals.[/quote]

Ain’t it the truth; could have saved my younger self a whole lot of time and wasted energy. Not to thread-jack, but were you purposely keeping your weight down for climbing?

To the OP. Along with the routines mentioned above I’d like to throw in Greyskull LP. Slower weight progression in favor of a bit more hypertrophy.


#6

Eating a lot CONSISTENTLY while and doing squats, deadlifts, presses and pullups will fix that. If you binge one day and then eat a few cookies for breakfast the next three days, you’ll get nothing out of it. This is about eating enough seven days a week. You want to fundamentally change the way you look? Change some fundamental habits.
Sincerely,
the dude who weighed 125 four years ago


#7

[quote]TX iron wrote:

[quote]

I had similar stats at a similar age as well. In many (climbing specific) ways I was strong as well, but I still weighed under 10 stone soaking wet because I didn’t eat enough. Moral of the story: nutrition is key to physique goals.[/quote]

Ain’t it the truth; could have saved my younger self a whole lot of time and wasted energy. Not to thread-jack, but were you purposely keeping your weight down for climbing? [/quote]

Nope, unfortunately I wasn’t that bright and I kept my calorie intake low to keep my “abz”, without realising this was also keeping me from any appreciable muscle mass, especially below the waist.


#8

[quote]nighthawkz wrote:
Eating a lot CONSISTENTLY while and doing squats, deadlifts, presses and pullups will fix that. If you binge one day and then eat a few cookies for breakfast the next three days, you’ll get nothing out of it. This is about eating enough seven days a week. You want to fundamentally change the way you look? Change some fundamental habits.
Sincerely,
the dude who weighed 125 four years ago[/quote]

X2

I’ve been both the skinny dude who “can’t gain muscle because my wrists are too small” and the fat, out of shape dude who would struggle with a single pull-up. Both have been fixed by CONSISTENT attention to diet.


#9

[quote]daywalker94 wrote:
is there anybody that would be willing to help me? I could really use a set diet plan of simple foods I could find in my fridge right now and go from there. also a exercise plan that would correlate. I have a full set of dumbbells and a bench at home and I feel more comfortable lifting at home as I first start out. I’ll most likely get a membership when I feel more confident in myself knowing what I’m actually doing haha. please, I would greatly appreciate some help[/quote]

  1. Create a diet plan that has you eating 2,700 calories a day, with 150g of protein. Eat meat, fish, eggs, dairy, oats, rice, potatoes, almonds, bananas, apples, olive oil, and berries. No supplements unless you need protein poweder to get 150g a day. Track your food intake.
  2. For now, start working out at least three times a week. Ideally, go to a gym. Those dumbbells can’t replace squats and deadlifts.

#10

Good advice so far. I was your age and close to same bodyweight when I started lifting (but a little shorter, so skinnier). With a bit of focus and discipline you can make the best gains of your lift in the next 3 - 6 months and dramatically change your appearance and muscularity.

I suggest you read this: http://www.T-Nation.com/training/10-secrets-to-building-mass

Also, do some searching on the Beginners forum. Your question has been addressed many many times in the past and there is a lot of good info to read.


#11

I’ll just add to the choir of right answers already posted.

Pick a simple program: Starting Strength (Rippetoe) or Stronglifts 5x5 or any of the other great workouts recommended. Be consistent with your program.

Get consistent with your diet: 2700-3000 calories a day, 150g protein a day, everyday, 0.5-1 gallon of water a day, 7-9 hours of sleep a night. Be consistent with your diet.

And just to reiterate: be consistent.


#12

[quote]nighthawkz wrote:

  1. Create a diet plan that has you eating 2,700 calories a day, with 150g of protein.
    [/quote]

I’m curious where you got these numbers.


#13

[quote]jjackkrash wrote:

[quote]nighthawkz wrote:

  1. Create a diet plan that has you eating 2,700 calories a day, with 150g of protein.
    [/quote]

I’m curious where you got these numbers. [/quote]

Me too. I’d consider the calories definitely too low, and probably the protein too.


#14

[quote]dagill2 wrote:

[quote]jjackkrash wrote:

[quote]nighthawkz wrote:

  1. Create a diet plan that has you eating 2,700 calories a day, with 150g of protein.
    [/quote]

I’m curious where you got these numbers. [/quote]

Me too. I’d consider the calories definitely too low, and probably the protein too.[/quote]

I’m not a food expert but I’d eat more of both categories if I wanted to get bigger and stronger. But I wasn’t calling him out; I’m just curious where the numbers came from.


#15

[quote]jjackkrash wrote:

[quote]dagill2 wrote:

[quote]jjackkrash wrote:

[quote]nighthawkz wrote:

  1. Create a diet plan that has you eating 2,700 calories a day, with 150g of protein.
    [/quote]

I’m curious where you got these numbers. [/quote]

Me too. I’d consider the calories definitely too low, and probably the protein too.[/quote]

I’m not a food expert but I’d eat more of both categories if I wanted to get bigger and stronger. But I wasn’t calling him out; I’m just curious where the numbers came from.
[/quote]

Hey, I can’t speak for this guy, but I said something similar.

My advice of 2700-3000 was based on personal experience being a person at about his same size, height, and training level not too long ago. I also cross-referenced by using a couple online calorie calculators, which gave me numbers from ~2500-2750 per day for maintenance.

As far as the protein goes, 1g per pound of bodyweight is a simple goal that is easy to accomplish for a beginner. I’m not sure on where I stand regarding consuming more than that (1.5g or 2g per pound of body weight), but I wouldn’t recommend anything less.

Just my two cents, and I in no way mean to answer for anybody else.


#16

[quote]OGrady wrote:
My advice of 2700-3000 was based on personal experience being a person at about his same size, height, and training level not too long ago. I also cross-referenced by using a couple online calorie calculators, which gave me numbers from ~2500-2750 per day for maintenance.

As far as the protein goes, 1g per pound of bodyweight is a simple goal that is easy to accomplish for a beginner. I’m not sure on where I stand regarding consuming more than that (1.5g or 2g per pound of body weight), but I wouldn’t recommend anything less.

Just my two cents, and I in no way mean to answer for anybody else.
[/quote]

I don’t have much experience with nutrition other than my own, so I’m not going to claim any superior knowledge on this one. From personal experience I know that less than 3k a day is a pretty severe cut for me, and I’m far from the biggest guy around. As long as the OP is on the ball enough to adjust both if he isn’t getting the weight gain, I don’t see any problem with starting at 2750, my hunch is that that’s a pretty low figure for a fairly active guy looking to put on mass quickly.


#17

To be honest, OP posted once almost two weeks ago and hasn’t been heard of since. I guess this thread is another instance of pearls before swine.


#18

[quote]nighthawkz wrote:
To be honest, OP posted once almost two weeks ago and hasn’t been heard of since. I guess this thread is another instance of pearls before swine.[/quote]

“Everybody wants to be a bodybuilder, but nobody wants to lift no heavy-ass weights”