T Nation

Need Help, Contest for Video Views


#1

I'm in a contest where I need to get as many views as possible. Today is the last day and I'm trying my best to finish on a high note.
I'm hoping to get some support from fellow TNation members.

Thanks in advance!


#2

I tried to watch the whole thing but I couldn't make it past the 1 minute mark without touching myself.


#3

I was waiting for you to show up, you can never help yourself with these.

YES its me DJHT, I found my old login.


#4

I like to get in on the ground floor for these types of things.


#5

I'm not surprised, OP also played Div 1 baseball


#6

I'm always curious as to why people who aren't training for equipped powerlifting use chains when they're lifting. Yes it looks badass, but I always want to ask what purpose the chains are serving in terms of their training and their goals.


#7


#8

It helps people lock out lifts and it's a good way to overload a muscle group without exceeding a weight that you can lift.

If you can bench press 300 lbs, that means that at the top of the movement you're really just locking out whatever weight it is that you're capable of getting past your sticking point, in this case 300lbs. But that isn't the amount of weight you can maximally lock out. If you can get 300lbs up off your chest, you can probably perform a top-half bench press for about 320-330 lbs, maybe even more.

So if you use chains, you can use more weight at the lockout point. As each link comes off the ground, you're basically adding more and more weight to the bar. This way, you still perform a maximal lift in terms of the first third/half of the movement, yet you are also able to perform a maximal lift for the last third of the lift since now you've got even more weight on the bar.

Personally, I think any time you can put yourself in a position to "overload" the muscles you should incorporate it in some way into your workout. Instead of performing standing overhead bb presses for instance, I perform push/presses. They allow me to use more weight than I am limited to if I have to use only my triceps, shoulders and traps to get the bar up and past my face.


#9

I know what chains do, that's why equipped powerlifters use them if I'm not mistaken, because they help to approximate how the lift gets heavier as you push towards lockout when you're wearing a bench shirt. And while I like your explanation here, it's only valid if your sticking point is anywhere but the lockout.

That makes sense, and I can follow your logic. I guess I've just always thought of the generic bench press as an exercise used to build the chest, and if that's the goal of the exercise as used by the lifter in a results-oriented program, why you're adding chains to make the lockout harder doesn't make sense to me. But this is all from a guy who doesn't really train for size anymore and doesn't bench anymore, so you can ignore my idle rambling if you want to.


#10

Look, I don't know what % of people have trouble locking a weight out as opposed to getting it off their chest or past a sticking point near their chest. I would guess that, given the muscle fibers are stretched out at the bottom of a press and therefore cannot grab onto each other as well as when they near the fully locked out position that more people have trouble with a sticking point lower in the movement rather than toward the end of it.

Regardless, if you can bench 300 but you can bench 335 with chains, why not bench 335? How is it not beneficial, if you're training for strength, to hold more weight in your hands? All I know is I'm going to gt stronger benching 335 than with 300 if I'm doing both weights for the same amount of reps.

Also, while I've never benched with a bench shirt, I would imagine that using chains is a good way to simulate the same scenario without having to get a shirt. Especially if you compete in meets where you have to lift raw or are a strongman competitor of some sort where you can't use any equipment outside of a belt.