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Need Advice on BJJ Training / Rest

Really like this forum and see some good stuff in here. I’m 43 yrs. old and have just taken up BJJ. Last night was my 4th class. Wanted to get some advice on training / rest. I have been in the gym for several years lifting and doing cardio so I’m not in horrible shape for my age. Since I’ve begun training BJJ two weeks ago I’m starting to notice joint pain and just the feeling of overtraining. My schedule is as follows:

Sunday - Full body workout
Monday - 45 mins of cardio
Tues - Full body workout / BJJ class
Wed. 45 mins of cardio
Thurs - Full body workout / BJJ class
Fri - 45 mins of cardio
Sat - Tournament softball usually all day

By looking at my workout regimen do I seem to be overtraining with the BJJ now involved? Do those of you with experience in BJJ train everyday and do you notice joint issues? Any advice on remedies for joint pain would also be greatly appreciated.

[quote]nc maniac wrote:
Really like this forum and see some good stuff in here. I’m 43 yrs. old and have just taken up BJJ. Last night was my 4th class. Wanted to get some advice on training / rest. I have been in the gym for several years lifting and doing cardio so I’m not in horrible shape for my age. Since I’ve begun training BJJ two weeks ago I’m starting to notice joint pain and just the feeling of overtraining. My schedule is as follows:

Sunday - Full body workout
Monday - 45 mins of cardio
Tues - Full body workout / BJJ class
Wed. 45 mins of cardio
Thurs - Full body workout / BJJ class
Fri - 45 mins of cardio
Sat - Tournament softball usually all day

By looking at my workout regimen do I seem to be overtraining with the BJJ now involved? Do those of you with experience in BJJ train everyday and do you notice joint issues? Any advice on remedies for joint pain would also be greatly appreciated.[/quote]

I was sore as hell when I first started BJJ. It’s natural. Just load up on fish oil and make sure you’re stretching a lot.

The 45-minute cardio sessions aren’t necessary, at least not 3x a week. Look to have at least one of those days as anaerobic conditioning. Remember, those BJJ classes will also help improve your conditioning.

You’re also lifting on the same day you’re doing BJJ. Your body probably isn’t used to all that extra stress, so why not just devote the day to 1 discipline?

Something like this…

Sunday-off
Monday-lift/cardio
Tues-BJJ
Wed-conditioning
Thurs-BJJ
Fri-lift
Sat-softball

Welcome aboard. Hope the suggestions help.

Thanks so much for the input. I’m really loving the BJJ. I’ve always been into it, but since taking it up I really have a new appreciation for it. The dedication and workouts are intense. I will try the fish oil. Also give the workout scheme you outlined below a shot. For the anaerobic workout should I be taking some sort of kickboxing, muay thai class or just workoing on core exercises?

[quote]nc maniac wrote:
Thanks so much for the input. I’m really loving the BJJ. I’ve always been into it, but since taking it up I really have a new appreciation for it. The dedication and workouts are intense. I will try the fish oil. Also give the workout scheme you outlined below a shot. For the anaerobic workout should I be taking some sort of kickboxing, muay thai class or just workoing on core exercises?[/quote]

There’s a bunch of stuff you can do for conditioning. Muay Thai isn’t a bad idea if it’s available to you.

Other things you can do:
Sprints
Barbell complexes
Bodyweight circuit
Strongman medley (if you have the equipment)

Bro, do whatever you want to do for conditioning. it isnt like you’re training for UFC.

on the off days, you may want to walk 2-4 miles instead of doing nothing (this is if you have a sedentary job)

Thanks to both of you for the input. Went and took a muay thai class last night. It was by far the toughest cardio workout I’ve ever done. I was totally gassed after one hour. Started out with jumping rope and medicine ball throws. Then did 45 mins. straight of kicking and punching with a partner holding pads. I must have lost 8 lbs. of water. Went home and iced down my elbows. Woke up this morning feeling alot better. Probably just going to take time to get used to a different type of working out.

[quote]elliot007 wrote:
Bro, do whatever you want to do for conditioning. it isnt like you’re training for UFC.

on the off days, you may want to walk 2-4 miles instead of doing nothing (this is if you have a sedentary job)[/quote]

I�??m 38 and about 7 months into my BJJ training.

A couple things have really helped me with the joint pain. One is that I supplement with glucosamine / condroitin (sp?) and massive amounts of fish oil.

The other thing, which will help with the joint pain and feeling of overtraining, is to learn to relax when you�??re rolling. The sooner you learn to use less muscle when training, the sooner your game will improve and the soreness and exhaustion will go away. When I first started I would be completely spent and sore after a 2 minute roll. Now that I learned to relax I feel like I could roll for an hour straight without gassing.

Thanks DSmith… I hear you on the brute strength part of rolling. Basically I have no clue what I’m doing yet or how to get out of things, so all I’ve been doing is trying to overpower my opponents. Tonight will be my 5th session. I do have to say that I’am remembering some of the moves and playing them over and over in my head. I hope to use some tonight. I will take your advice and try to stay calm and use less strength. When you say you use massive amounts of fish oil, how much is that exactly? I do take them, but usually only 4/day. Should I up them? As for the joint pain I was using animal paks, but to me they are a waste of money. I may take your advice and go straight to glucosamine.

[quote]DSmith111 wrote:
I�??m 38 and about 7 months into my BJJ training.

A couple things have really helped me with the joint pain. One is that I supplement with glucosamine / condroitin (sp?) and massive amounts of fish oil.

The other thing, which will help with the joint pain and feeling of overtraining, is to learn to relax when you�??re rolling. The sooner you learn to use less muscle when training, the sooner your game will improve and the soreness and exhaustion will go away. When I first started I would be completely spent and sore after a 2 minute roll. Now that I learned to relax I feel like I could roll for an hour straight without gassing.
[/quote]

Something you might want to consider since most BBJ classes are in the evening…

Sun: OFF
Mon: Cardio/Lift
Tues: Cardio (AM), BBJ (PM)
Wed: Lift
Thurs: Carido (AM), BBJ (PM)
Fri: Cardio/Lift
Sat: Softball

As far a BBJ is concerned, you arent really overtraining but you can split your workout up as i have listed for you. I assume you have a day job which is an easy way to split cardio up from the rest of your workout. You can wake-up, run, work, then workout. This should give your body enought time to rest before your BBJ.

You also might want to check out Joe Defranco and the article “westside for skinny bastards.” in this workout you will find a dynamic warm-up that shoudl help with your joint problems. his website is defrancotraining.com i believe. Also, check out Mark Twight for some conditioning tips, this should give you a good workout for your lifting days and wear the shit out of you. it will get you conditioned quick.

Unreal, people.

Dude has has FOUR classes. And you’re already purporting to design programs and shit for him?

Yeah, cuz you know A LOT how your body is going to respond to BJJ training after an entire four classes.

How about he, I don’t know, train for a month or so before such prognostications occur?

You can always tell the different between ammys and pros in these types of threads. If you really think you can, after four classes of a NEW and STRENUOUS physical activity, start meaningfully designing programs, you really don’t know as much as you think you do.

Maybe he’ll need to lay off of training. Maybe he’s a freak and won’t. It’s way too early to tell, since anyone who has never done BJJ is going to be super sore after four classes. Even if he hadn’t been training, he’d be sore and feeling beat up.

well, CaliforniaLaw i do. he lacks conditioning for a sport that is totally designed around conditioning. i have my belt in both taekwondo and BBJ so i know that conditioning is key. he needs to start a strenuous program otherwise he should just quit now. BBJ is different from any other sport and its a different midset.

nc maniac, train like a freak and dont let anyone tell you otherwise. succession in this sport is not about being sore, its about about knowledge, conditioning, and mental strength.

good luck

your 20 years old and you have a black belt in “BBJ”?

wtf?

Best way to increase conditioning for BJJ is actually doing more BJJ. I’ve once made the mistake of quitting BJJ-practice to work purely on my conditioning, thinking it would benifit me in the long run. While my all-round conditioning improved, when I restarted BJJ I was even worse than where I was when I stopped. For some reason it’s very sport-specific. Sidenote: my stand-up conditioning did increase however.

So if there is an option for you to take more classes, do that.

i started when i was 4, my mom made me do it.