T Nation

Need A Program: Rugby Speed/Agility

So heres the deal:

Its my freshmen year in college, and i just finished rugby season. It in about late february, we start tournaments.

I need to put on a lot of short distance speed, agility, and if possible endurance.

Strength is not a problem, and i have plenty of it, but i dont move as fast as i should.

Any program that will make me faster and more agile is very much appreciated.

[quote]smooth9825 wrote:
So heres the deal:

Its my freshmen year in college, and i just finished rugby season. It in about late february, we start tournaments.

I need to put on a lot of short distance speed, agility, and if possible endurance.

Strength is not a problem, and i have plenty of it, but i dont move as fast as i should.

Any program that will make me faster and more agile is very much appreciated.[/quote]

Eric Cressey’s ultimate off season is a must for you! I say order it now to maximize the time you can use it for until your season starts.

Moving away from that, if you don’t have cash, I’d go with DeFranco’s modified westside methods. Although, I’d say use higher rest intervals for now in order to maximize any speed gains you’re going to get. Don’t be afraid to lose your conditioning! You can play your way into better shape, but you can’t play your way into faster speeds for the most part.

I’d start by posting up your max lifts and vertical jump/broad jump on here, and you’ll likely be able to get a bit more advice.

I, 5’11 and about 190 lbs

As of now, my max lift are as follows
(as far as i know):
Bench: 225-235
Squat:300~
Deadlift:415-425
Clean and jerk-205~

Vertical and broad jump i have no way of measuring.

I’d say my 40 time is mid to high 5’s

The exercises shown on this site helped me back in the day to really round off my winter program. This will defenitly help!

Cheers!

[quote]smooth9825 wrote:
So heres the deal:

Its my freshmen year in college, and i just finished rugby season. It in about late february, we start tournaments.

I need to put on a lot of short distance speed, agility, and if possible endurance.

Strength is not a problem, and i have plenty of it, but i dont move as fast as i should.

Any program that will make me faster and more agile is very much appreciated.[/quote]

I would say that training for agility and endurance should not be your focus, as these two qualities can be improved just by playing your sport itself. No need to put any additional stress on your joints from agility drills in the off-season when you’ll be taking plenty beating during the season.

Work on acceleration up to 40m. Start low with something for example 2x10x15m, build up from there. Right now you need to improve your acceleration as it sounds from your 40 time. Just a general example.

Hills are a great tool to teach you how to properly get in the correct posture for acceleration; if you don’t have any access to hills in your area, stadium stairs are an OK option too, or towing a sled/tire. Just remember that if you do choose to tow a sled/tire or any additional weight that it not exceed 10-15% of your bodyweight; anymore and it could hinder your mechanics and teach improper tendancies that will not improve your speed.

Keep improving your maximal strength, as it sounds like you could always improve in that area. 2-3x per week speed work should suffice as well. If you want, you can check out www.charliefrancis.com, there are some threads specific to rugby training on the forum I believe.

Best of luck.

[quote]WRCortese5 wrote:
smooth9825 wrote:
So heres the deal:

Its my freshmen year in college, and i just finished rugby season. It in about late february, we start tournaments.

I need to put on a lot of short distance speed, agility, and if possible endurance.

Strength is not a problem, and i have plenty of it, but i dont move as fast as i should.

Any program that will make me faster and more agile is very much appreciated.

I would say that training for agility and endurance should not be your focus, as these two qualities can be improved just by playing your sport itself. No need to put any additional stress on your joints from agility drills in the off-season when you’ll be taking plenty beating during the season.

Work on acceleration up to 40m. Start low with something for example 2x10x15m, build up from there. Right now you need to improve your acceleration as it sounds from your 40 time. Just a general example.

Hills are a great tool to teach you how to properly get in the correct posture for acceleration; if you don’t have any access to hills in your area, stadium stairs are an OK option too, or towing a sled/tire. Just remember that if you do choose to tow a sled/tire or any additional weight that it not exceed 10-15% of your bodyweight; anymore and it could hinder your mechanics and teach improper tendancies that will not improve your speed.

Keep improving your maximal strength, as it sounds like you could always improve in that area. 2-3x per week speed work should suffice as well. If you want, you can check out www.charliefrancis.com, there are some threads specific to rugby training on the forum I believe.

Best of luck.
[/quote]

Excellent post!

This is a speed program that I have followed a couple of years ago.

Week 1

Day 1

3 X 3 X 40 metres @ 90% effort
Recovery of 90 seconds/repetition and 5 minutes/set

Day 2

3 X 3 X 30 metres @ 100% effort

Day 3

3 X 3 X 60 metres (20m @ 100% + 20m @ 90% + 20m @ 100%)

Week 2

Day 1

3 X 3 X 50 metres @ 90% effort -
Recovery of 90 seconds/repetition and 5 minutes/set

Day 2

3 X 3 X 40 metres @ 100% effort
Recovery of 5 minutes/repetition and 10 minutes/set

Day 3

3 X 3 X 90 metres (30m @ 100% + 30m @ 90% + 30m @ 100%)
Recovery of 5 minutes/repetition and 10 minutes/set

Week 3

Day 1

3 X 3 X 60 metres @ 90% effort
Recovery of 90 seconds/repetition and 5 minutes/set

Day 2

3 X 3 X 50 metres @ 100% effort
Recovery of 5 minutes/repetition and 10 minutes/set

Day 3

3 X 3 X 120 metres (40m @ 100% + 40m @ 90% + 40m @ 100%)
Recovery of 5 minutes/repetition and 10 minutes/set

For in season speed maintenance your time on every sprint over 40m as an example should be monitored. The idea is to ensure that you keep the intensity high and high only. Once you notice a considerable drop in your time it is not recommended to continue.

  • This is speed specific training for sprint athletes *

Hope this adds some value!

One of the single-biggest mistakes you can make is over-emphasize metabolic conditioning for a spring season (unless that is your true competitive season). You’ll just be shortchanging yourself on off-season progress. I would recommend just playing your way into shape.

At risk of sounding self-serving, the off-season manual would be great for you, as it would allow you to determine your weaknesses and select a program based on them - not just shoot from the hip with a random program. Go in on it with a couple of teammates and train together; you’ll love the results.

www.UltimateOffSeason.com

[quote]Eric Cressey wrote:
One of the single-biggest mistakes you can make is over-emphasize metabolic conditioning for a spring season (unless that is your true competitive season). You’ll just be shortchanging yourself on off-season progress. I would recommend just playing your way into shape.

At risk of sounding self-serving, the off-season manual would be great for you, as it would allow you to determine your weaknesses and select a program based on them - not just shoot from the hip with a random program. Go in on it with a couple of teammates and train together; you’ll love the results.

www.UltimateOffSeason.com[/quote]

Honestly, im not that worried about my spring season. I would like to be faster by then, but my true goal would be more long term, and getting faster by next year and the coming years.

I’d love to try your off season program, but i simply dont have the money.