T Nation

Navy Routine

http://www.pytlik.com/escape/navyseals2.html

What do you think about this routine?
I am thinking about this but I am not sure. What kind of goals would someone have to use this routine? Would I gain a lot of strength? I might cut out allll the cardio though. Thanks

[quote]musclebuilding wrote:
http://www.pytlik.com/escape/navyseals2.html

What do you think about this routine?
I am thinking about this but I am not sure. What kind of goals would someone have to use this routine? Would I gain a lot of strength? I might cut out allll the cardio though. Thanks[/quote]

I think you would gain alot of everything on this routine. If this routine was easier, more peoplke would do it. It might get knocked a little bit because its not a typical gym routine. But then again, a typical gym routine is probably not as tough as this one progressivly gets.

If you search the seal routine furthur, they end up doing like 20-25 sets of 20-25 push ups. Then they do a ton of sets of chins, and dips and sit ups as well. I don’t care what anybody says about bodyweight exercises. If you could do those kind of workouts, you’re chest would be a monster. If I could do that rigoris of a training i would. I think its easier jusy to go to the gym and do benches and squats. I’ve seen some seals before. Thos guys are jacked.

I think it depends on what your goals are. If you wanna become a Navy Seal, or if you want to have great endurance and some “functional strength” it’s fine. However if your goal is just getting big and strong this is probably not the best routine for you. You would need to eat an incredible amount while on this routine to avoid muscle loss.

[quote]mason33 wrote:
musclebuilding wrote:
http://www.pytlik.com/escape/navyseals2.html

What do you think about this routine?
I am thinking about this but I am not sure. What kind of goals would someone have to use this routine? Would I gain a lot of strength? I might cut out allll the cardio though. Thanks

I think you would gain alot of everything on this routine. If this routine was easier, more peoplke would do it. It might get knocked a little bit because its not a typical gym routine. But then again, a typical gym routine is probably not as tough as this one progressivly gets.

If you search the seal routine furthur, they end up doing like 20-25 sets of 20-25 push ups. Then they do a ton of sets of chins, and dips and sit ups as well. I don’t care what anybody says about bodyweight exercises. If you could do those kind of workouts, you’re chest would be a monster. If I could do that rigoris of a training i would. I think its easier jusy to go to the gym and do benches and squats. I’ve seen some seals before. Thos guys are jacked.
[/quote]

That routine isn’t what’s making those SEALs jacked. The gym is.

That’s great for incredible muscular endurance and psychological training, maybe some slight muscle gains, but not much.

[quote]SWR-1240 wrote:
mason33 wrote:
musclebuilding wrote:
http://www.pytlik.com/escape/navyseals2.html

What do you think about this routine?
I am thinking about this but I am not sure. What kind of goals would someone have to use this routine? Would I gain a lot of strength? I might cut out allll the cardio though. Thanks

I think you would gain alot of everything on this routine. If this routine was easier, more peoplke would do it. It might get knocked a little bit because its not a typical gym routine. But then again, a typical gym routine is probably not as tough as this one progressivly gets.

If you search the seal routine furthur, they end up doing like 20-25 sets of 20-25 push ups. Then they do a ton of sets of chins, and dips and sit ups as well. I don’t care what anybody says about bodyweight exercises. If you could do those kind of workouts, you’re chest would be a monster. If I could do that rigoris of a training i would. I think its easier jusy to go to the gym and do benches and squats. I’ve seen some seals before. Thos guys are jacked.

That routine isn’t what’s making those SEALs jacked. The gym is.

That’s great for incredible muscular endurance and psychological training, maybe some slight muscle gains, but not much.[/quote]

I don’t know. I never tried it. I don’t know if i could make it through that. I do regular style lifting. Hevy Benches, deads, squats and so forth. I think that is much easier than that seal routine. That routine seems tough to me. Probably killer muscular endurance. And I am willing to bet if you actually did it yourself. You might be suprised by the amount of muscle you could gain on this high frequency bodyweight training. i bet its considerable larger than you are thinking. I have done push ups and dips before and got great results. to be honest with you, they are just to tough to keep doing. I think its easier to just lift weights. Although my gains probably arn’t as good.

[quote]mason33 wrote:
I don’t know. I never tried it. I don’t know if i could make it through that. I do regular style lifting. Hevy Benches, deads, squats and so forth. I think that is much easier than that seal routine. That routine seems tough to me. Probably killer muscular endurance. And I am willing to bet if you actually did it yourself. You might be suprised by the amount of muscle you could gain on this high frequency bodyweight training. i bet its considerable larger than you are thinking. I have done push ups and dips before and got great results. to be honest with you, they are just to tough to keep doing. I think its easier to just lift weights. Although my gains probably arn’t as good.
[/quote]

I have tried a simmilar routine when at a training command with a lot of wannabe SEALs (myself included).

We trained together like this for a while after getting a SEAL training plan a lot simmilar to this.

It’s very difficult and kicked my ass.

I was able to do 138 pushups, with good form, in a row. I would only stop in the up possition, and would never raise my butt, or move my hands. I was able to do them all within 2 minutes as well.

I weighed about 145lbs then, and didn’t have very much muscle on me at all, but also didn’t have much fat on me either for the first time in my life.

[quote]mason33 wrote:
And I am willing to bet if you actually did it yourself. You might be suprised by the amount of muscle you could gain on this high frequency bodyweight training. i bet its considerable larger than you are thinking.
[/quote]

I used to do CrossFit, and I never gained any muscle.

[quote]AgentOrange wrote:
mason33 wrote:
And I am willing to bet if you actually did it yourself. You might be suprised by the amount of muscle you could gain on this high frequency bodyweight training. i bet its considerable larger than you are thinking.

I used to do CrossFit, and I never gained any muscle.[/quote]

maybe you’re not putting forth enough effort

even i got some results and all i set was a few sets. i never even tried that rigoris of a routine.

[quote]mason33 wrote:
maybe you’re not putting forth enough effort

even i got some results and all i set was a few sets. i never even tried that rigoris of a routine.
[/quote]

If you put on muscle doing a routine like this, then you’re probably a new lifter and would most likely put on muscle doing any routine.

PS - Please try a few sets of spelling, grammar, and typing.

[quote]AgentOrange wrote:
mason33 wrote:
maybe you’re not putting forth enough effort

even i got some results and all i set was a few sets. i never even tried that rigoris of a routine.

If you put on muscle doing a routine like this, then you’re probably a new lifter and would most likely put on muscle doing any routine.

PS - Please try a few sets of spelling, grammar, and typing.[/quote]

Are you a troll? Sorry for being so sloppy. I wasn’t turing this in to my professor. I was taking Thermodynamics classes for my engineering degree, not typing and english composition. Sorry, so sloppy.

This routine makes me think of the thread “Dad Strength” because this type of stuff won’t make you huge but you’ll be functionally strong.

in my oppinion this routine will keep you in very good shape, but would not be good for strength and size gains

[quote]redsox348984 wrote:
in my oppinion this routine will keep you in very good shape, but would not be good for strength and size gains[/quote]

Isn’t that kind of a contracdictory statement? What is in very good shape then?

The first nine weeks seem very doable with only slight modifications to your current training (if you are training 3x’s a week).

But beyond the ninth week it seems that this would become your training plan. I have done workouts like this in the past for PT in the morning 3 days a week, and lifted at night, with no ill effects, I just got in better shape.

Will42

http://www.T-Nation.com/findArticle.do?article=302tc2

Here’s an old article by TC about SEAL training.

Here’s a picture of a SF guy. He’s not huge but you get the sense that he can handle himself.

Interesting topic.

I’m currently suffering from swollen tendons in both hands and am unable to lift weights until they heal. So for the past six weeks, I’ve been on a bodyweight-only program similar to the one posted. Push-ups, dips, various types of chins and ab work, supplemented with some running and heavy bag work.

The results have been great. In six weeks, I’ve dropped about 15 lbs of fat and my arms and chest have increased in size (not just visually; I actually measured). Plus my work rate during my training has gone through the roof.

A qualification or two, however:

I’m a relative newbie compared to a lot of guys on this site, so almost any training would have had a positive effect. I don’t want this fact to discount the effectiveness of bodyweight moves however; I even “feel” a lot more athletic than before. That sounds like an empty statement I know, but that’s the best I can describe it.

Over the past couple of months, my focus has been shifting from stacking on mass to building a ‘fighter’s physique’ (about 185 lbs at 5’10"); this sort of training is perfect for that. Bas Rutten and Fedor Emelianenko to name two big-name fighters pretty much ignore the weights and do bodyweight training for strength.

I plan on sticking with the bodyweight stuff for at least another 10-15 weeks, so if people are keen, I’ll keep posting my results every few weeks. Will be interesting to see if the gains (strength and physique) keep coming or plateau after awhile.

Rob

[quote]justrob wrote:
Interesting topic.

I’m currently suffering from swollen tendons in both hands and am unable to lift weights until they heal. So for the past six weeks, I’ve been on a bodyweight-only program similar to the one posted. Push-ups, dips, various types of chins and ab work, supplemented with some running and heavy bag work.

The results have been great. In six weeks, I’ve dropped about 15 lbs of fat and my arms and chest have increased in size (not just visually; I actually measured). Plus my work rate during my training has gone through the roof.

A qualification or two, however:

I’m a relative newbie compared to a lot of guys on this site, so almost any training would have had a positive effect. I don’t want this fact to discount the effectiveness of bodyweight moves however; I even “feel” a lot more athletic than before. That sounds like an empty statement I know, but that’s the best I can describe it.

Over the past couple of months, my focus has been shifting from stacking on mass to building a ‘fighter’s physique’ (about 185 lbs at 5’10"); this sort of training is perfect for that. Bas Rutten and Fedor Emelianenko to name two big-name fighters pretty much ignore the weights and do bodyweight training for strength.

I plan on sticking with the bodyweight stuff for at least another 10-15 weeks, so if people are keen, I’ll keep posting my results every few weeks. Will be interesting to see if the gains (strength and physique) keep coming or plateau after awhile.

Rob[/quote]

I would be interested in your physique progress. I would also be interested to know if your maximal strength (weighted chin, squat, etc.) goes up, goes down or stays the same with this.

That routine is taken from the BUD/S Warning Order. It is not designed to get you jacked. It is designed to get you to the bare minimum standards prior to attending BUD/S.

[quote]KombatAthlete wrote:
I would be interested in your physique progress. I would also be interested to know if your maximal strength (weighted chin, squat, etc.) goes up, goes down or stays the same with this.[/quote]

Well, after six weeks (late June to present):

Bodyweight 187 > 173
Chest 42 > 44.5
Arm 14.25 > 14.75
Waist 35 > 32.5

I appreciate that these numbers are at very much at the ‘beach physique’ level - but starting out from being the skinny-fat posterboy less than a year ago, I’m actually starting to be happy with the way I look for perhaps the first time in my life.

It might be a few months before I return to the weights - an ultrasound of my wrists last week indicated 2-3 months downtime at least. Then again, who knows if I want to return to the weights as a pure lifter anyway - like I said, my priorities are shifting.

My program (modelled on Wayne ‘Scrapper’ Fisher’s Conditioning programs):

Push-up: ladders
Chin: ladders
Dip, pullup: 4 supersets
Sit-up, leg raise, Russian twist, plank: 4 supersets

Takes me about 40 minutes, resting 30sec (timed) between sets.

I am able to do the program 3-4 times a week, as I find I recover much more quickly than I did from lifting.

Heavy bag 3 times a week, running 4-5 times.

Rob