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My Wife Becoming a Vegetarian

So my wife is becoming a vegetarian…or at least she is gonna experiment with it. She has several health problems. Among other things she has celiac disease, but she also has other food issues too. Meat does make her quite sick but she has no problems with dairy and eggs. I know im leaving out a lot of detail here but thats the jist of it.

But anyways, it seems like a lacto-ovo vegetarian diet (vegetarian plus dairy and eggs) would fit right in with what she can and cant handle for food. Im just wondering if anyone here has experience with this or if anyone has any tips we could use?

I think you’re looking for legalzoom.com

I’m just kidding man. I have nothing helpful. As already evidenced above

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Came for this comment, was awarded it on the first reply :+1:

In all seriousness, vegetarian plus dairy and eggs makes your options endless! Ain’t nothin to it but to google “high protein low carb vegetarian recipes” and go to town.
Green veggies, black/kidney/pinto/garbanzo beans, eggs any way, cheese, and if necessary, plant-based meat. You can spiralize zucchini and squash to replace pasta, you can use riced cauliflower to replace rice, etc.
Just gotta get a little more creative. Even as a meat eater, I often grab vegetarian recipes and just add chicken/beef to them, because their flavors are amazing, since they’re making up for the lack of meat.
Shakshouka is a great option, you can also make good potato curries, egg curries, I made an African peanut and chick pea vegetarian curry that was amazing too.

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Sounds good. We will have to try to be creative for sure…one thing she is worried about is ending up eating the same kind of stuff over and over again.

With all the options available, you’d have to put forth a concerted effort to eat the same thing again and again in order for that to happen.

Also: what about fish? Usually, “I don’t like fish” is just from people who haven’t tried certain things. A medium rare salmon fillet or a seared tuna steak is about as far from catfish and tilapia as you could get.

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She is thinking about having fish occasionally, she does like it, but it also triggers her health issues just like other types of meat…just not as bad.

This is actually pretty much how I eat except that I also eat fish.

Basically this is what I do that’s Lacto-ovo:

High heat stir frying in a wok. Coconut and avocado oil are great for frying and have neutral flavor. Peanut oil is also good but adds noticeable flavor that may conflict with some things. I use peanut oil and sesame oil together for making fried rice, which I eat a lot of. For extra protein, I go really egg-heavy on the fried rice. I use similar recipes for making fried ramen and fried quinoa.

I use a lot of seasonings to make things more interesting. Garlic, basil, etc. MSG is really good and there’s nothing unhealthy about it.

Good plant sources of protein are things like quinoa and peas.

I put cheese on almost everything.

Making vegetarian pizza is easy but I have not tried any of the gluten free pizza crusts.

I rely on milk and yogurt for most of my protein, with eggs and fish contributing probably 30% of protein intake.

Some things that meat has can’t be replaced by vegetables so I supplement. Creatine and collagen for instance.

This is just what I do; I don’t know what all your wife’s concerns and goals are so I realize a lot of this isn’t relevant.

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Learn some Southern Asia and South American spice mixes and condiments and youre set to make anything palatable.

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Very good, I think there is no problem in following a lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet, since you are going to cover limiting amino acids of vegetable proteins with the inclusion of eggs.
Also if you consume dairy / cheese you will have protein sources of high biological value (high quality)
You must bear in mind that if you are thinking about strength training + this type of diet, you will have to refine a lot by combining vegetable protein sources to achieve a complete amino acid profile, since most vegetable proteins are limiting (they do not have all the amino acids) and even less leucine content, which is the most “important” amino acid to maximize MPS protein synthesis

Sorry if it is not fully translated, I am Spanish, I have written in Spanish hehe

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Thats very helpful for sure. We have talked about the creatine thing but i never thought of the collegen part. We will look into that thanks

She wont be doing much in the way of heavy strength work, not really her interest. More of stuff like conditioning, bodybuilding and palates is what she likes to do.

Hello. I’ve heard that giving up eating meat is bad because it contains a lot of vitamins and other beneficial elements. Is it true? Thanks

You can stop eating meat and obtain vitamins and minerals from other sources (in some cases supplement such as b12) although you will have to combine more meals to avoid limiting amino acids from vegetable protein for example or eat more amounts